Sam

Massive Striped Bass makes History

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Yes, the wait is over.

One of the most prestigiuos recreational game fish species is the beloved striped bass. The northeastern region is known for their trophy striped bass catches. This August, another big rockfish hit the deck, but this time it was destined to make history. The lucky angler realized the dream of every angler, to make it into the World Record Books.

After much anticipation, last week the International Gamefish Association finally made it official. Greg Myerson of Westport, Connecticut became the new IGFA All Tackle World Record holder of a massive 81.88-pound striped bass. The previous record of 78.8-pounds caught in Atlantic City, N.J. lost its throne after a nearly three decade reign.

Greg caught the huge striper while fishing in his boat off of a boulder on August 4th in the Long Island Sound in Westbrook, Connecticut. He was using with an eel that measured nearly 15-inches long to entice the beast! After about a 15-minute fight, the trophy was safely in the boat, although the same could not be said for the angler. During the fight Greg slipped, breaking a few ribs. I’m sure he considered the injury just part of the battle wounds! A small sacrifice for such an amazing catch.

In addition to now holding the All Tackle record, Greg’s catch also secured the men’s 80-pound line class world record, which previously stood at 70-pounds. Congratulations to Greg Myerson on this historical catch! It is truly the catch of a lifetime!

Massive Striped Bass makes History | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

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Reeeeah!!!!

Breaking a few ribs for a record... is not bad :happy10:

Great day for that dude.

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And there are bigger ones out there.

A number of years back, <acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym> DNR pulled up one in a net in the Chessie, I THINK it weighed 96 lbs.

The reason we don't get the huge ones is because there are fewer around, and they are smarter.

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good to see that there are some big ones still out there, after all the other fish we hear about that are in decline, or getting smaller (i.e. swordfish?)

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