10 posts in this topic

Yep, read through Coop's post in this section, he includes pictures!

Way to go Coop!

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one thing i dont understand about the guts......is that the only waves that I see breaking are the ones near the beach..., but in the diagram it shows waves breaking farther out.....there are seldom any that break farther out on distant sandbars...........maybe its my imagination

but i guess i have a hard time finding where the guts are on bethany beach

:rolleyes:

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Ok -I've only been doing this about a year, but my impression of that type of scene is that is really no bar - or not enough of one in relation to depth/size of wave to break. In those cases I believe you have to look for more subtle things like holes / cuts at low tide, etc. Prominent sandbars definitely make it easier to identify structure.

Outside our condo in North OC, for instance - there is no outer sand bar to speak of - I look at the contour of the bottom at low tide, and look for any holes on the water by a "bubbling" effect.

In assateague, there seems to be almost a continuous parallel sandbar(although i've only seen the "walkon" sections..)

When I was in Avalon, NJ recently, the waves were breaking randomly at various distances from the shore -my assumption there was the bottom was more like multiple small bars with many cuts in betwee rather than a continuous bar.

One thing I do from the condo is to study the beach at all tides from above (we're on the 16th floor) and you begin to notice more subtle things. Sometimes its tough to see things closer to the ground (especially for me - at 5'5", i'm pretty close to the ground!), so the higher you can get (dune, top of a cooler, vehicle, etc) the better

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Travis, sometimes its very difficult to find a cut when there is very little wave action but it still can be done,,,when there is a good swell rolling in they become much easier to find and you would be suprised as to how many you can find,,,and trust me, thats where the fish are,,,you are more likely to catch fish in a cut and the sides of a cut than a hole, many will fish a hole, which I find very unproductive.

here is a description which I hope helps,,,first of all, water is rushing out, so there tends to be a fair amount of turbulence,,,ever see an outgoing tide in an inlet?,,,or stationary waves in a river?,,,thats what visualization you need to have when looking for a cut,,,you see flat calm water,,,move on,,,I know its tough when the surf is nearly flat, then you need to go visual,,,you generally can see the sandbar when its flat, the color tends to be brown, but if there is a cut, the color may change to a deeper blue, try there,,,believe it or not, its kinda opposite during a big swell,,,you want to look for agitated water which tends to be brown due to the water rushing out and you will often find sea foam heading out to sea,,,fish it,,,your chances go up dramatically,,,I will often go out during a big storm and search for cuts and mark them and hit them the next day,,,personally, I like fishing the bigger surf,,,seem to always have my best catches and can find the cuts.

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wow, great information..........no more just going out and fishing the closest spot.....i guess i'll need to work on finding structure.......it should get interesting!

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that advice really helps, thanks.

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i have used my cheapo hand held gps to remember attractive locations.

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Yep, that's the way to do it!

And welcome to the forum old_bald_guy!

i have used my cheapo hand held gps to remember attractive locations.

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