9 posts in this topic

Im just worndering if anyone had a good spot to fish in the inlet b/c when i come down i fish right were that bend is on the oc side. I use those curl tails on my bucktail jigs and all i come up with is the backs bitten off. I am going to try smaller ones this year but does anyone have a favorite spot.:icon_pirat:

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The inlet is not that big, and there really aren't any honey holes there.

What I can tell you is that near the ocean is a lot of rocks and hard structure, as you move towards the bay it is more of a sandy bottom. At night I like fishing the hard structure, during the day I like fishing for flatties on the sandy bottom.

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completly disregaurd my post. I misread your post. I thought you were talking about the OC inlet.

I don't have much info on IRI sorry.

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I'm pretty sure i posted on IRI before....but here are my thoughts on it:

If you have an incoming tide, moving at its peak of flow...people tend to like the North side , West of The Highway...close to the Coast Guard station. this time of year, there are bluefish and small stripers...which you can catch using buchtails on the bottom..as you mentioned. You want the tide ripping to throw bucktails...as the fish stack up to feed. Cast towards the bridge....wait to hit bottom....drift...and then reel in like heck to avoid snagging on the rocks close to shore. You want your lure to look like bait riding in on the tide. Watch some others do it...and learn from them. Also, if you are getting bitten off...its bluefish...throw a medium weight spoon or "gotcha" plug and work it deep or shallow...trying to find where the fish are located. Once again, watch others and see if theyre catchin'...then copy them.

On an outgoing tide. i prefer to fish the South side, East of the Bridge...as the fish sometimes stack up towards the locean in deep water...fish on the jetty. Cast the same way I mentioned above...but control the drift so you are going twith the current and on the bottom (w/ bucktails). There are a lot of snags at IRI...because as you get closer to the sides, ther are rocks and hang-ups. You can also throw some swim baits, like storm lures...but they too will get bitten in half when small blues are around. Go with a spoon if that happens. Low light conditions are best...sunup / sunset...which get even more productive when a ripping tide coincides with that time of day.

A lot of people fish for Tog on the rocks at IRI...but that is a science in itself. They use sand fleas...only cast out a few feet, and wait patiently for the lightest tap tap.

When the bay gets warm..as in now during the summer...the incoming tide is more productive, because its moving in the cooler water. And as the sun gets brighter, as during the day..the fish get deeper in the water.

Very Important: The rocks at IRI are slippery and dangerous when they get wet. Use shoes with metal spikes on them...korkers...golf shoes...whatever. Just use your head because a lot of people slip and get hurt. Don't dare to venture out towards the light unless you have the above mentioned spikes on your shoes.

I hope this helps a little...IRI can be a great place to fish.

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IRI can be very dangerous. If you are not used to the area, I would advise fishing with a buddy.

Mark has great advice, here is a little more input. For years, I have been "floating" fleas for stripers. There is a trick to it and you have to put in time.

I use an 8/0 circle hook with no sinker. I pack on as many sandfleas as I can fit and toss it in an eddy. Look for an area that doesn't have much current and a circular motion to it, like a whirlpool. Do not cast your line out, toss it on the middle of the eddy. Let some slack in the line so it can be sucked down in the vortex. After a few minutes, close the bail and try and feel for the rocks. This is tedious and sometimes you will loose your rig.

Pop the fleas just a little to make sure you are not snagged. If you do get snagged, let some slack in the line and what a bit. Sometimes a fish will pick it out of the rocks for you, or the current will help. If you toos your line in the eddy and it runs E or W in the current, reel in and reset your line.

You will find that the stripers will be there a certain time of the night or day and try to gauge your fishing time with the bite. I have been down and figured out the "bite time" and for 2 weeks I was there and got my limit in 45 minutes, every night and was on my way home.

Best of luck.

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Thanks guys. That was a lot of great info. I have lost some rigs there and a gotcha plug . The plug got stuck in the rock in shallow water and i see this real small fish come up to the back hook. I felt a tap tap and that plug must have been stuck good because i would not come out of the rocks.

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Well Morty...im gonna have to try that technique out....now if i could just catch 200 sand fleas in one scoop like you.

Man...whenever I think of IRI I think of this year going out on the rocks...and this guy passes by me with two monstrous stripers hanging over his back....and same with his buddy following him....the tails almost touched the ground!! This spring some large ones were caught from the rocks at night......pumps me up!!!

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