jklinz

Eating Bluefish Only 12 Times a Year...

8 posts in this topic

there was also a article on the front page of the SUNDAY JOURNAL today....same article.....now one question/concern ...the comercial fish that are being sold throughout the state/country.....one would only assume that they contain conataminants but there are no consumption limits on those

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Ya know, everything contains something bad for you.

Can't eat the food, can't breathe the air, bad water, etc, etc, etc.

Sheesh, may as well crawl in a hole and eat dirt.

You can go to NOAA.gov and look under fisheries for warnings and serving sizes.

They aren't as doom and gloom as "others".

PCB adds flavor, bring 'em on!

Instead of giving the flavorful fish to the kids who would rather have fish sticks, and pregnant women, eat 'em yourself!

Catch a few Dogfish and eat them!!!

I'm serious, they are tasty!

Along with large Skate.

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I agree. You never know how to take news like this...are they simply covering their butts in case there is a low chance that someone gets ill.....or is there a real concern for everyone who eats blues and stripers. Its troubling...but i choose not to live in fear and contnue with my dietary habits.

It also makes me wonder why someone haasn't come up with a "home test" for pcb's / mercury etc. that you can use on some of the fish meat you are going to eat.

I dunno...but I love to fish and like to eat some of what I catch....

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Not certain, but I think they take a whole fish and grind it up for testing purposes. That says little about what you and I may eat in the form of a filet. It would be nice to get some clarification.

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It's funny how the PCB levels have been going down for years as the warnings get more and more strict.

The theory behind no consumption limits for commercially caught fish is that 'the coms know how to properlly clean them'. And for the most part, fish caught commercially are properly cleaned.

That's why it's so important for us recs to remove the red strip of meat under the lateral line of the fish. That's where almost all toxins accumulate.

Some cultures eat 100% of the fish and that's why we get the warnings now.

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I wonder what the contaminant levels are in crabs and clams in the delaware waters? Anyone have any info on that?

I have been eating fish from the IR bay for the past 30+ years. I did have thyroid disease and had to have my thyroid removed at age 25. I wonder if it was a result of PCB's? They day it affects the endicrine system. Hmmmm.

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ECX,

I did hear of a report last year about Arsenic levels being high in the IRI area. The report stated that erosion on Burtons Is. has contributed to this. From what I understand the IRI power plant used Burton Is to dump all of thier ash years ago.

I will try and find the report.

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I wonder what the contaminant levels are in crabs and clams in the delaware waters? Anyone have any info on that?

I have been eating fish from the IR bay for the past 30+ years. I did have thyroid disease and had to have my thyroid removed at age 25. I wonder if it was a result of PCB's? They day it affects the endicrine system. Hmmmm.

Most contaminants build up in fatty tissues. Crabs don't have much, if any fat in their meat. Their fat is in their organs which are not eaten. There are no advisories for eating crabs from the St. Jones river, but there are advisories for eating any type of fish from there.I'm not sure about clams, other than bacteria is the main concern.

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