4 posts in this topic

St. Patrick's Day Report

13 March 2009

Spring is right around the corner, and with more days hitting into the seventies, expect reports of the first spring trends soon. But for now, anglers seem to have deep dropping fever instead of spring fever. And who can blame them with the deep dropping scene sizzling off the Virginia coast? More reports of excellent catches hoisted from the depths of the canyon edges are stirring a lot of interest. Recent deep dropping trips are yielding good numbers of big seabass, blueline tilefish, golden tilefish, and a variety of grouper. The dog fish are out on force though, so be prepared for a work out. There are also scattered reports of bluefin tuna lurking about the warm water changes, with fish boated to near 175-pounds lately.

A few boats are targeting tautog on offshore structures when they can find a weather window. Although the tog action is faring moderate at best, some fish to 10-pounds were recently pulled from an offshore wreck. With crabs becoming more readily available, folks will resume more normal togging patterns soon. Decent seabass and keeper flounder are also available at the Triangle wreck area, where Captain Fred Feller, skipper of the Mariner out of The Fishing Center, had a good catch this past week.

The recent warm weather helped raise water temperatures along the coast, rekindling a scattered rockfish bite off the coastline this week. But the bite remains hit and miss, with the boats putting in their time occasionally finding some quality fish. Captain Dale Carlson treated his crew aboard the Jeanie Lee out of Long Bay Pointe Marina to a limit of nice stripers pushing to nearly 40-pounds while trolling near whales and under working birds off Cape Henry. These larger fish are steadily making their way to their spawning grounds further up the Bay rivers, where several boats are taking advantage of catch and release opportunities.

Perhaps with the luck of the Irish, folks will begin experiencing some decent inshore flounder activity. Rumors of keeper flatfish coming from within Rudee Inlet this past weekend is generating some exited chatter about the promising fishery this year. Keep the regulations in mind; you can only keep five fish per person, with a minimum size of 19-inches. With Rudee Inlet water temperatures jumping almost ten degrees over the last week, speckled trout are beginning to show more interest in eating, with several reports of fish hitting lures lately. The puppy drum action is still going strong in both Rudee Inlet and the Elizabeth River, offering a good fight on light tackle. The Hot Ditch area of the Elizabeth River is still yielding quality speckled trout, with Mirrolures still producing the top numbers. Roland Butler of Suffolk had good luck in this same area recently when he landed a nice 7-pound speck while casting a Mirrolure. Shad are also making a showing in several of the usual river haunts, with shad darts working well.

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Thanks for the report. Some stripers are already near spawning grounds in our area, but haven't seen the "mass" spawn numbers yet.

It is about to bust loose.

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Thanks for the report and congrats.:icon_thumleft:

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Thanks for the report Julie what type of mirrolures are they using and color for the specks

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