3 posts in this topic

Hey guys,

OK, So I read Cod wars, and several other book about EEZ's and the trials and tribulations of the history of commercial fishing. Essentially, Britain and other European countries started sending out high dollar "modern" ships to harvest cod a few miles off the coast of Iceland. Iceland protested because they were more used to a less modern style of fishing and their fisherman did not have a chance against these huge ships. After several incidents and tons of political mumbo jumbo the EEZ was born.

Extending out from one's coastline you essentially have the rights to harvest the water. I understand this. What I do not understand is the next step. Why does this relate to not being able to keep stripers more than three miles off shore. Who has the right to keep them? Can they be commercially harvested by anyone, or, did the US just state that these waters are protected, using the EEZ as their means for doing so ? Also, is it run state by state, or federally?

Also, and more importantly, how come I can catch and release rockfish out of season at the bridge tunnel or any power plant all year and not get harassed by anyone including the Coast Guard (like after 9/11 when they anchored up at CCNPP and just watched all day) but for some reason in the ocean the Coasties are warning everyone to move on if they catch a rockfish, or they will be cited for harassing the species and issued tickets.

Does anyone have a clear answer?

I don't understand. This makes no sense to me.

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I say fish for blues and not stripers ;) Opps sorry officer, but I've caught 20 blues to the 2 stripers I caught and since I'm targeting blues, why do I have to leave?

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The EEZ (exclusive economic zone) extends offshore 200 mi.

The three mile area is controlled by the state who's shoreline it borders. Rockfish were already protected in the EEZ despite what the Pres. decreeded earlier this year. AS FAR AS I KNOW... no one can harvest them outside of the 3mi com or rec.The coasties can move you at their disgreation right or wrong and can claim juridiction on all tidal(and some non tidal) waters. They can be in erroe though as the striper regs correspond to the state's 3mi zone. This has happened due (in part) to having 2 regulatory/managment groups operating along the east coast. They are the Atlantic Marine Fisheries Service (simply put a group of states regulating) and the National Marine Fisheries Service(the ferderal group). Often these two are confused or seen as one in the same. They are not. That's why it's good to know both sets of regs/rules/size and creel limits and to make sure you can land them in the state you sailed from. Ther has been some discussion/argument in recent years about the value of opening the EEZ for striper fishing com and rec IMO not a good idea and as always there are plenty of cheaters pushing the 3mi zone. I just this morning was talking to a guy about the Va. seaside striper winter thing.Again it is "year-round" in the Md. seaside but closes the second week of Dec and reopens after the new year i nVa. So if i ran out of OCMD down to winetr quarter shoal (in Va.) I would'nt be legal even thought there is a reciprocal permit deal with va. for charterboats. If you brought them back to OCMD and landed them there you would still be illegal(you caught them in Va. waters. Like wise with Del but now Del. has a hefty fee for out of state charterboat permits and I'm sure there are some "grey areas" as far as jurisdiction for NJ boats in the Del. bay. So it pays to know all the facts/regs before you go or book a trip.The stripers are "federally" protected in the EEZ. Hope this helps.

Edited by captcl

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