13 posts in this topic

As some of you know, I spend a lot of time in my backyard in the fall and winter. It has become my favorite time to fish. The spring/summer crowds have all gone and its just me, the stream and occassionally some wildlife (blue heron, deer, hawks, and foxes). Very therapeutic and relaxing..and with the right layering - very comfortable even down into the 20's.

My greatest frustration has been ice in the guides. For that - dipping the rod in the water for a few seconds does the trick. Also using fixed line length when possible also cuts down on icing. I predominantly am "high stick" nymphing at this time of year.

Below are some of my "pet fish".

picture 1: Thanksgiving weekend - 14" brown on a mink-dubbed beadhead nymph of my own design

picture 2: pretty small brown caught yesterday in the snow on a black conehead woolybugger.

picture 3: the stream as it was yesterday (high and a bit discolored after all the snow and sleet we've had)

downsized_1126081621.jpg.da161218a2ce5c1

1220081145.jpg.0280ffc06c57f316ea8815763

1220081134.jpg.07e6ddc3b07ed3776823144fe

Edited by trowpa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice fishing, Steve! I like specks just as much as stripes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right in the back yard how can you beat that... Thanks for the pics Steve.. and Merry Christmas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right in the back yard how can you beat that... Thanks for the pics Steve.. and Merry Christmas

Yeah - takes me longer to put my waders on than to walk to the stream :)

And merry christmas to you too! I'll be back in the spring..hittin it hard for somethin with stripes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Steve,

Two questions, do you have any pictures of the brook trout you were telling me about? I have been researching both the brown and brook and would like to see a real picture of both and compare the differences in appearance.

Also, if you design your own flies, do you get to name them? I just get cracked up saying, "mink-dubbed beadhead nymph" or " black conehead woolybugger" :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sam - no, i don't have any pictures of a brookie from back there -they are rare compared to the rainbows and browns. Last one i caught i'd say was a few years ago before i carreid a cam phone with me! But to summarize way i identify them - browns: golden to brown background with red to black dots. Brook: dark background with wavy lines and dots - yellows, whites, bluish or red. I know - tough to do without seeing them. Next time i catch one (gosh i hope its soon!) I'll be sure to take a picture.

Yes, i guess you do get to name the flies if you design them...the mink-dubbed one - i just never felt a need to name its so simple...lets just call it the "Stevie B special". However - the "black conehead woolybugger" is actually the REAL name of the fly - that isn't my design. Its a very very common fly! WoolyBugger. Just with a conehead on the front for some flash and weight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool, Steve. Have a blast out there and if can get someone to take some shots (or better yet, video) of you casting, I would like to see that.

I've only really ever seen it done twice and it almost looks like an art compared to the HEAVING we do on the beach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
do you have any pictures of the brook trout you were telling me about? I have been researching both the brown and brook and would like to see a real picture of both and compare the differences in appearance.

0207091556.jpg.2635db08b46f367acc116a6fa

Well - this past Saturday i took a trip to lancaster county and fished some wild brookie streams. And guess what? 3 brook trout. These particular brook trout were more silvery than they usually are - usually they are predominantly a grey/green color. Not sure if that is due to time of year, habitat/diet, or what - but these do have the main characteristics that flags them as brook trout: the lower fins being red with white leading edge:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice job, Steve. Pretty fish!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

Help us keep the lights on by becoming a Site Supporter!
Site Supporter