21 posts in this topic

The idea of resident stripers has been on my mind for a long time now...and since were all physcho about fishin....I'd like input.

I fish Indian River Inlet during the summer when there are no other Striped Bass to be found anywhere close. Just throw a heavy bucktail during the running tide in the right rip.....your gonna catch 'em, along with some Blues. There are always Stripers that stay put, w/out migrating north. It just boggles my mind a little. I know that the water temperature plays a big role, and the current flow and availablilty of bait keeps them around, but why don't they migrate north like the bigger fish. There are no stripers on the coast line at this time for miles North or South.....as far as I know...only at the inlets.

I take stock in "Bergmanns Rule" which states that the smaller the animal the more surface area, and therefore its easier for the smaller fish to maintain a internal temperature that is agreeable in the warmer water..... Why don't these fish stay offshore in deeper water, and why is it just the shorties? Is IRI that good of a habitat to hold Stripers year round?? If thats the case, are there "resident stripers" ot OC Inlet year round...because OC Inlet doesn't get near the Sharpie fame IRI gets. Any thoughts?

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From what i've noticed fishing the 50 bridge in Ocean City there are definietly stripers around during the hot months in the summer. I always thought the only time i'd be able to catch them was the fall and spring. However i've been catching plenty of shorts off the bridge and a few keepers here and there. But Every time i go theres atleast one 36+ incher caught.

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They seem to favour the night at OC inlet. I think that probably because they are protected(in the 3mi)so you don't get much of an offshore sample.They get summer shorts to the north so it would be the food source and the "protection" for the juvenile fish. They are out there outside the 3mile just look at the commercial violators(and recreational) over a 3-5year period.

It could eventually change at IR, cycles of the speices,food and habitat.Think about the Trout in Del Bay!:cool:

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I've seen large pulled from the Ocean City inlet during June/July. They are deep and like eels and live spot. :happy7:

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You have to look no further than the Chesapeake Bay to see a LARGE population of resident stripers that are very active even in water temp in the upper 80's.

It common to see large schools of breaking stripers around 18" or just under all summer. Down deep stripers over 18 are not uncommon.

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There's definitely resident stripers around OC and IRI... mostly small but there are keepers too... and some stay all winter, not just summer. Rt. 50 bridge is great structure for bass... most years a good fisherman could catch a bass there any month of the year if he really wanted too.

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Its always in the back of my mind....I go to IRI probobally 15 times a year...trying to "master" the area. There are always shorts...but here shortly, there should be some big boys heading south.....can't wait.

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We get residents up here in South Jersey all summer long, every year. They aren't always holding in deep water though there is a jetty that has a 90 foot hole at the tip where they can be targeted pretty regularly.

To be honest, we go out early in the back bays and most times they can be targeted in 2-5 feet of water on top of flats. There is one guy I am friends with that goes out on his skiff and targets them as he pole fishes. He pulls up onto a flat and uses a pole to manuever his skiff around until he sees activity on the surface.

I asked a few times on the board a year or two ago about this and most members thought I was nuts to target stripers in the summer, but they are around and sometimes thick all summer long. Just have to know where to look and what methods work.

I highly suggest topwater in the early morning. Pretty consistent bite for me anyway.

Tight lines!:blob1:

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Thats kind of my point of this thread.....that the smaller Stripers stay around because they can deal with the warmer water, and loose the body heat quicker than the bigger stripers. So the shorts are here year round...and when things get cooler, and the ideal bait moves down / up the coast, the LARGE HOGS follow.

I've caught a lot of Shorts...but I am still trying to catch a 40" plus...hopefully this season.

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From the looks of it, it seems everyone agrees that they are here year-round. Winter, just like summer, the smaller ones are here.

Christmas Day, February, snow, ice and such, the juvies are in the surf.

My question is, what are they eating in the frigid months?

What species stays on all winter?

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I dunno. I would think they are feeding on bottom creatures....thats a good question.

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In the colder weather, we get them on bloodworms up here in NJ. No floats, just a 7/0 Gamakatsu Circle hook on a fish finder rig. Hook themselves right in the corner of the mouth every time, especially in the colder water. I think it's their less-aggressive natue in the winter months that allows them to slowly run with the circle hook as it sets the hook itself. Drag firm, but not too loose or too tight.

Good luck! :hello:

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I think rockfish are like salmons in that they hangout in these protected area[ iri, chessy, oc inlet] for 2-4 yrs ...Once they reach there reproductive size that's when they make there migratory run

My geuss on what they feed on during the winter is w/perch, bullminnows, eels, shads and herrings at least until the weather break

Nice thread

P.s. I heard of guys catching rocks at the narrows in january

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Here is a pic of a resident striper caught on Wed night at the rt. 50 bridge. Soon enough they will be joined by their traveling compadres the BIG COWS.

0918080146.jpg.3c5f0c098953f2c612fdc1184

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Thats a pretty fish.

I was just down there this weekend....and contemplated fishing the bridge on Saturday night. I cast netted about 50 mullet from 5" to 8" at high tide Saturday p.m. in the bay....so was thinking they'd be a hot bait for the bridge that evening.

Decided to go to AI instead....

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Heres another pic of a 28" one caught on the 50 bridge Saturday night. Fishing has just started to pick up on the stripers and hopefully the big dogs will be in soon.

28stripe.jpg.ea896da205559a2af9e33183d8e

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My question is, what are they eating in the frigid months?

What species stays on all winter?

I kept one that was around 30" and the water temps were in the upper 30's. Its stomach was loaded of what looked like very small crabs, maybe those isopods.

I know in other forums, many say fishing is over after December, not sure if they were referring to cows but there a plenty of stripers all winter long that can be caught in the surf zone in our waters...and alot, they are just short, but not all of them. This has been the case the last three winters...maybe things are different now with the warmer winters the last few years.

I use to think once water temps drop around 45*, there were no fish around. Not the case at all...they (stripers) will bite in the coldest of water.

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Got to agree with Scott there Ive had times from now till Feb. where I have gotten rock not the biggest but still catching.. thats what it is all about in the dead or winter..

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