29 posts in this topic

Went out to dinner at Masons in Easton with some friends. Sure enough, skate was on the menu. This is a fairly high end resteraunt (wouldn't think skate would be on the menu) and asked the waitress, just to be sure, "what is skate"? Yep, its the skate we catch. I didn't order it, but my buddies wife ordered it and the meat was fried and was shaped just like a skate wing (half moon). To my suprise, it was very good. Next large skate I catch, it's coming home.

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I've eaten skate before. You can actually cut the wings up to make immitation scallops. Very good, but dont eat a "Cow Nose" skate. It's a dark meet that tastes like MUD!!!

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LOL... I hope it catches on. We could use some "thinning out" on the ocean front.

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LOL... I hope it catches on. We could use some "thinning out" on the ocean front.

ain't that the truth:happy7:

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I've been trying to think of ways to intorduce it as an asian delicacy, they can then rid the world of skate, just like turtles, sharks, and tuna. Voracious consumption machines they are...use all theirs up and then come after ours.

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Skate is actually fairly popular already in a lot of restaurants. I've also heard it called the next big thing in seafood. I've got a few skate recipes I'm going to try when i start fishing this year.

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What I find funny is what the restaurant charged for the skate. The skate was in the upper $20 price range. Whadya think the restaurant paid for that skate? They said the skate was caught locally. I know food mark up is high but I would think the skate was probably the cheapest thing that they prepare.

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I had it in a high-falootin fancy French joint. At lunch it was $17.

It was a big hunk, was worth it. I really love the taste too.

No Ben, let's not tell the Asians. We already have Omega to deal with....

:angry8:

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tell omega skates have better yield then bunker

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so who is going to do the youtube video on how to clean and prepare them?

I vote for the skateking himself! OcSnapper!

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so who is going to do the youtube video on how to clean and prepare them?

I vote for the skateking himself! OcSnapper!

hhmmm , maybe a new menu item for snappers, just call it the special

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Just wait for the next fling, there will be the other white meat on the grill :booty:for all to eat.

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hhmmm , maybe a new menu item for snappers, just call it the special

Y'all ever have his scallops? There ya go.......lmao

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Any Doors fans...

Seriously,

I've caught more skate at Assateague than anything else so this year with food prices doing what they're doing this is the plan. I will always have a good day fishing:icon_surprised:

Skates and Rays

Skates and rays are frequently caught. Unfortunately, their appearance is so unusual that they are commonly killed and tossed overboard. They are, however, established in the European and Asian culinary traditions. They can be used interchangeably, although some species are considered superior to others.

Skates and rays are related to sharks. They are Elasmobranch fish; that is, they have skeletons made of cartilage instead of bone. Skates live in salt water and differ from rays in certain physical and biological characteristics. Most skates have rough, thorny skin. All rays have smooth skin. Rays have distinct barbs or spines at the base of their tails, and skates do not. Poison glands are attached to the barbs of some species of rays. These rays, called sting rays, can inflict painful wounds. Skates are generally sluggish and less active than rays, which tend to group into larger schools and hunt for food. Skates reproduce by laying eggs enclosed in horny capsules that often wash onto beaches. Rays do not lay eggs; embryos develop inside the mother.

Common skates in mid- and northern Atlantic waters include the big skate, the little skate, the clearnose skate, and the winter skate. Sting rays are most abundant in warmer waters south of the Chesapeake Bay, but some species range as far north as New England. Common rays include the bullnose and cownose rays.

Skates and rays are strong swimmers. It can take considerable effort to land them. When using a gaff or pick, avoid puncturing or damaging the wings (the edible portion). It's a good idea to stun rays and skates as soon as you land them. This is especially important with rays, which can cause injuries with their sharp spines. Use heavy gloves when handling them. Cut off the tails and spines of rays to prevent injuries.

The wings are the only edible part of both skates and rays. Remove them promptly and discard the rest of the body or use it for bait or chum. A sharp knife and a flat surface are required for removing the wings.

Pack the wings on ice in a cooler and then refrigerate or freeze them later. If you plan to refrigerate skate or ray wings for several days, leave them whole and packed in ice in the refrigerator. Some sources report that skate actually improves if left in the refrigerator for forty-eight to seventy- two hours. The texture is said to get firmer during this aging process. Skate can, however, be eaten earlier with good results.

To prepare skates or rays for cooking or freezing, fillet the meat from the whole wing. A sharp knife and cutting board are the only tools you need.

To freeze skate or ray, leave the skin on to keep the fillet intact. Wash each fillet carefully and freeze it as you would any other fish fillet. If the fillet is large, skinning will be much easier if it is first cut into strips two or three inches wide. Another way to skin the fillets is to poach them for several minutes in a solution of three parts water to one part vinegar. The skin should peel off easily after poaching.

Some cookbook authors suggest soaking skate and ray fillets in chilled salt water or vinegar water for several hours before preparing them. This will remove any ammonia or other off flavors that may have developed. If you have handled your catch properly, however, ammonia flavors should not be present. If you do wish to soak your fillets, use a solution of one cup of salt or one- half cup white vinegar for each gallon of water.

Skate and ray fillets are lean and light colored. An unusual delicacy, they have a firm texture and can be prepared by any cooking method used for fillets from fish with similar characteristics. Poach them, bake them, bread them, or fry them in the oven, a pan, or deep fat.

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Wait a minute...

Are "we" saying that we can eat the B-2 bomber sized Rays too??

Now THAT will feed a few ppl at the summer fling!

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Everything i could find online says the skate has been over fished in Europe, Asia, S. America, basically everyplace but here, obvious to any Assateague fishers. So... who is going first? The post at the top of the thread said they taste good. So WHY NOT? They look nasty? So do oysters and they are great. I have hesistated in years past because if they tasted nasty I'd feel bad about killing one. Yes, soft at heart. But now that someone has tried it and said they tast egood i am in. Let you all know if they are good when the weather warms a bit. Pat

PS -Going to Cape Cod for two weeks in July. Going to fish with my ywo brothers who live in Mass. Marblehead and Duxbury. I have never caught stripers like I do with the Marblehead brother.

Enjoy spring and i hope you all get hooked up soon. Water inching up to 50, maybe this weekend.

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It has beens settled. Skate is not great. I took one and ate it. No flavor and chewey chewey chewey. I ate the one that has like leapard spots. If anyone else tries one don't eat that kind it was no good.

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OMG!!!

You shouldn't eat that one, you will grow gills!!!!

Go to fishbase.org and see if you can find a name for it.

Put Ray into the common name, then sort by country.

It takes a while to load everything, minute or so.

Then go down to USA.

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That doesn't sound like a skate. Maybe a small leopard ray?

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It looked just like the picture of the clear nose skate on our site. It wasn't good eating. I don't know man, maybe i prepared it wrong? No gills yet, but the sides of my neck do itch...

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No gills yet, but the sides of my neck do itch...

LOL!!

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Over 30 years ago I had heard that the wings of skates tasted like scallops. When I got to the beach the first I caught I cut off the wings and went back to the RV to cook it--YUK- AND DOUBLE YUK! Tasted like mud, never tried it sense. Recently I've heard there are certain species that are good to eat, one being the Bat Ray. Of course I found that out after I had thrown the ray back. It was a really big one too.

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Yuck!

There are ways to prepare them.

Look around on the net, and here, for recipes.

I love 'em!

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oh man, i think i catch 20of them everytime we go fishing. dogfish recipes should be posted too. i hate them, bait robbers... in the U.K. dog fish is the most common fish used in fish n' chipsso the next time a small shark trys t steal your bait make him your next meal.

1st mate

BarracudaIII

York, ME

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..in the U.K. dog fish is the most common fish used in fish n' chipsso the next time a small shark tries to steal your bait make him your next meal.

1st mate

BarracudaIII

York, ME

I have done that several times now and agree, they are excellent on the grill.

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