Guest RACN35

Striper beach netting in North Carolina!

33 posts in this topic

I guess that pretty much wraps up the season for Outer Banks.

So all you folks that were planning to contribute to the local economy at Outer Banks, go elsewhere, the Stripers are gone.

Take the money you were going to give to the small motel owner, the local bait shop, the mom & pop grocer and pocket it. All that money I WOULD HAVE spent there for one or two fish.....

Perhaps call them up and tell 'em why you won't be contributing to their winter funds. All because a bunch of greedy so-and-so's decided to rape the water and strip mine the Stripers.

The State of North Carolina needs to be caned for allowing such a thing to occur. "Ask for local seafood" my behind, I wouldn't give those restaurants that take that meat one dime.

Ya wonder how many THOUSANDS of fish they took. This was just a tiny clip of THREE DAYS!!!!

Or...

Am I missing a logical reason here?

Yeah, and this is a toned down version of what I was thinking....

*Thread being moved at the request of Jamie*

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Hey Steve - stop movin threads on me while i'm tryin to reply! lol j/k

Its hard to believe that's legal!!! :crybaby2::crybaby2:

We have people on this board who fish for 100 hours, catch one nice striper and release it unharmed. Then this guy does this??????

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Why is that legal? That is the most insane thing this boy has ever seen. And I have seen a pile of insanity in 41 years. Now, that is the kind of crap the tree and beach huggers should be complaining about down there. And in Corolla , ???

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They pretty much ruined the whole surf run of the striper there so they could get the money for robbing the water of striper!!!! I thought that a law or something was passed so that you could overfish the waters like they just did.

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heres the deal. the fish taken commercially are just a FRACTION of what is taken by recreational fisherman. here are some numbers for you. in 2006 (2007 statistics aren't published yet) the North Carolina commercial striper harvest was 270,932 pounds. that same year the estimated recreational harvest was 2,112,024 pounds! about 9 times as much as commercial. it is the recreational fishermen who are the doom for the fish. the fish are just too stupid and taste too good. I think they should cut the recreational limit in half, and still they would take more than the commercial guys. just remember any fish you buy in a store, market, or restaurant is caught commercially. no matter how much you bitch about commercial fishing, whenever you buy those crabs or striped bass or eat that flounder dish at your favorite restaurant, you are supporting the commercial fishermen.

the season isn't over, it has just begun

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by the looks of that i find those numbers hard to believe

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I have no problems with the commercial fishing industry for the most part. But that operation that the guy has going on there I would believe has to be breaking commercial fishing laws. The biggest thing I see is this, and it dovetails on the subject on another post about Cool Ice's problem. And it is this; in that video, it does not appear that the "fisherman" is checking the sizes of his fish as they are dragged onto the sand. How often is this guy stopping to check the net and releasing the small ones or out of slot ones? It appears that he is pulling the net in continuously with no regard for the sizes of the fish that might still be alive but too big or small to keep. By the time he does check them, are they still able to be released? I would think this part of the operation on a boat would be dealt with as the haul is brought aboard, and the illegal ones would be put back in before they croak. And , as recreational fisherman, those are the some of the fish that will help us be able to have a recreational event in the years to come. I am going to Nags Head in June for a week, and I see this event as a "buzz kill" to my fishing buzz before I even get it started!

Alright I am done. Peace out and Happy Fishing to everyone!

Grossy

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he may not have checked for undersized fish but then again he may have, you just can't tell from the video. there is no slot limit to adhere to. the fish just have to be over 28" which most are this time of year. in the ocean they are pretty much all BIG fish, averaging 25-30 lbs. each. I don't think the recreational estimate is right, but I don't think it is too far off either. It is almost impossible to do an estimate since every year the variables are different but I think everyone underestimates the recs. I have personally seen EVERY charter boat booked in OI with trailers lined up for a mile and a half up to the fishing center with the parking lot full of trailers, plus the boats at the other marinas and fishing centers around there I would guess that there was probably around 150 recreational boats fishing that day. almost everyone got there limit. 2 fish per person doesn't sound like a lot but 25 pound average, 2 fish per person, maybe 5 person average on boat, roughly 150 boats = around 37,500 pounds... in one day! not counting the boats that had their limit came in and went back out, and not counting the boats from VA that cam south that day, nor does that count the fish taken off the beach. that was just a quick little estimate for one day a few years ago. I wish I could pull up some of those reports. it is very hard for people to look at the big picture.

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the commercial guys get a limit of 50 fish per day per operation regardless of people in the operation. the season was only 3 days. thats 150 fish per year per operation. 1 charter operation kills more fish than 1 commercial operation easily and there are ALOT more charter operations.

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Here's where I have the issue...they can rape the beach like that, BUT the fish still need to be protected enough to keep the EEZ in effect?

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My first thought was a net washed on shore and this guy was pulling up on the beach. I don't see how it can be legal if it is...

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I fished a lot this year and did not catch 50 stripers. let alone keep 50. this guy in the video is a contractor not a commerical fisherman ,he is the reason a commerical fisherman can't make a living. I 'd like to know what % of the total income comes from fishing should have got the tag # or maybe some one could check.:bs:

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what makes you say he's a contractor? the truck? that was the 3 day beach seine season which you are required to launch your boat from the shore. you need a truck to trailer the boat. He has a commercial fishing license and pays his dues on it and that pretty much makes him a commercial fisherman to me. that day DMF had several trucks checking out operations for legality and if he didn't have a license I'm sure he would have been busted.

I am not trying to sound like I am in favor of the commercial fishermen because really, I am not. I just keep seeing the finger pointed at them like they are killing all the fish when it is simply not true and that recreational anglers are doing a lot more damage to the population. the quota that they were allowed was 160,000 lbs. which they didn't even reach. if you give the fish a 20 pound average that is only around 8000 fish that the WHOLE commercial operation is allowed over the WHOLE year. 8,000 isn't that many fish in the big picture. I read yesterday that the state of Virginia filled out over 1000 citations in the month of december alone! 40 lbs. is the weight requirement for Virginia so that is over 40,000 pounds just of citations in 1 month of the 4 in the season. those are the same fish we are catching in North Carolina, just 20 miles north or even caught in NC but weighed in VA in some cases.

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if its legal, then i dont see the problem with it.

i know many guys that fish in the winter and work construction when its warmer.

they need to make a living too

the commercial harverst is much less then the recreation harverst, check the numbers

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I think what I see here is the difference in a struggle.

The recreational fisher puts in:

1. Money for rods, reels, tackle and bait.

2. A bunch of money for fuel to drive the sometimes hours to "reach the Beach". Let's not forget any tolls along the way.

3. Money for the overnight stay at a local motel.

4. Any food or drinks purchased locally.

5. A whole lott'a time in the sand, often cold, wet and windy.

6. We won't count the 4X4, the netter needs it too.

The local merchants often benefit from the recreational in many ways.

The netter:

1. Nets cost money, need periodic maintenance too.

2. Perhaps food and drinks purchased locally, maybe not, might just be a catch and run day.

3. Motel? Probably is a local, no need for a room.

4. A boat seaworthy enough for a few runs out. Probably wouldn't cost much.

5. Licenses for the applicable activities.

6. Money generated by the catch supports the activity, "netting" a clear profit.

I believe the recreational puts out much more money per fish than the netter ever would, no doubt. I also see the vast amount of hours the recreational puts in for just one fish.

I think the major gripe is the recreational feels the netter has not "put in his time" as is so ofter written in the forums. In addition, it may be felt that the netter is a rape & run operation, leaving fewer fish for the recreational to pursue.

Thoughts?

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If the guy is doing this legaly, then I personally have no quams with the individual. If you complain about the guy, it's not the guy you should be focusing on but the ones that make the laws.

It really is no different than the netters offshore. It just appears worse because the guy is pulling all the fish on shore in front of the general public. Sure, its shocking to see, but it really isn't any different then the commercial guy a mile off the beach, who I am sure is getting alot more poundage then the guy on the beach.

My biggest problem with netters is the by product catch that is killed. This makes me sick but its an inherent thing that goes with netting that I wish would never happen.

All the info I have read on this topic, leads me to believe it's the recreational fisherman who are putting a major dent in the striper population. I would like to know what happened to the trout that I hear were in great numbers many years ago. What is there drop in population a result from?...recreational fisherman or commercial fiasherman or something else like climate, lack of baitfish or did they move elsewhere. I have also noticed in just the past 3 years that I have been fishing, a reduction in kings each summer? Why has this hapened or maybe they just were not in our area this year.

Fishery management is tough job.

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I think that we got spoiled a few years ago with the booming population. like I said before, the fish are too stupid and taste too good. naturally, when the stock starts going down and there are less catches people start pointing fingers. I think they should reduce certain kinds of commercial fishing and reduce rec limit, make the rec 1 fish per person. I have been saying that for years.that isn't much less for one person but that is a lot less when you consider 500,000 anglers. I don't see much of a problem with the beach launching. not a lot of bycatch and not a lot of waste. I have issues with other methods though. since the nets are tended to and not just set and left, most of everything is still alive for release when pulled in. I think there should be some commercial fishing but some of it just gets out of hand, just like some recreational fishing gets out of hand. if there were no commercial fishing there would be no rockfish at your restaurant or store. a lot of people say "ban commercial fishing" but they fail to realize that all the mullet, and bunker in tackle stores comes from commercial fishermen. if there were no commercial fishermen then we would pretty much be recuced to using, bloodworms, fishbites, and other artificials.

also, since the season was 3 days, the DMF was watching them hard from trucks on the beach, boats in the water, and planes in the air. it was easier to regulate and watch them on a short season like that when they are all doing it at the same time and place.

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Matt,

Many years ago, before fishing, I always went to the OB to surf. We spent many weekends a year surfing down there. One year we were out checking the surf and saw trucks leaving the beach with nets. When we arrived at the beach minutes later, there were literally hundreds and hundreds of doggies and over a dozen hammerheads (one was over 6') left on the beach dead along with other fish. I couldn't believe what I saw. Maybe this was just an usual amount of byproduct catch. Iam going to have my friend dig up the pics. I remember one being taken of my buddy next to the hammerhead. I am sure you can see many fish left for dead in the background, mostly doggies.

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I think a lot of the anger and disgust comes from something similar to what the "other' Steve mentioned above - the amount of money and effort spent by the recreational fisherman compared to the commercial. However I think it is specific to the surf fisherman.

Granted there are huge amounts of fish killed by rec anglers - but that is primarily due to boat fishing - charters going out. But I wonder what the true number of fish killed by surf fisherman is? That has to be pretty low.

When you consider the surf fisherman spending hours and hours and hours (ok, days, months, and for some - years) and hundreds, even thousands of dollars - trying to catch a single friggen Striper now and then -and there is all this talk of declining populations - there is something that just seem inherently wrong to see other methods of fishing allowed where the surf can literally be swept clean of fish.

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coop, one of the regs in the beach seine season is that it (the net) must be closely monitored and after it is set it must be pulled in in less than 2 hours. most of everything should be alive and pretty easy to release. standard gill nets however can be left out for hours upon hours and maybe even days at a time. I think what you saw was an old gill net operation or if it was a seine operation the people had the opertunity to release them alive but just threw them on the beach instead like a lot of recs do in the surf. I am in favor of commercial fishing, I think we need it but I don't agree with some of the methods and limitations. I don't like the trawling for example. there is no hook and line for stripers and that is probably a good thing since it would just be a long line operation. another example is long lining for tuna, it catches a lot of fish but has a high by catch rate and kill rate. greensticking does not have as much by catch and everything you get is alive so you could release it. you probably won't catch as much greensticking but I think it is a better way of commercial tuna fishing.

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Matt, this occurred in the late 80's...man I feel old... this event probably no longer occurs with the new regs in place.

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at the start of the video it said JAN 9 2008 ......7 DAYS AGO......1 WEEK FROM TODAY ........Last WEEK

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STRIPED BASS SEASON - BEACH SEINES: ATLANTIC OCEAN

Dr. Louis B. Daniel III, Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 6:00 A.M., Tuesday, January 8, 2008, the season for the harvest of striped bass with beach seines in the Atlantic Ocean waters of North Carolina SHALL OPEN. The following restrictions shall apply:

I. SIZE LIMIT

No person may possess, transport, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass less than 28 inches total length taken from the Atlantic Ocean.

II. HARVEST RESTRICTIONS

A. No ocean beach seine operation, regardless of the number of persons or vessels involved, may sell or possess more than 50 striped bass per harvest day.

B. Harvest will be allowed on the following Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, January 8, 9, and 10, unless closed earlier by proclamation when the harvest quota is reached.

C. For the purpose of this proclamation, a beach seine is defined as a net set vertically in the water and pulled by hand or power to the shore to capture fish. A beach seine consists of warp lines, wings and a bunt.

D. Beach seines are required to be deployed only from vessels that are launched from the ocean beach where the operation is fishing. One end of the beach seine must be attached to shore at all times during the operation.

E. Beach seine operations are limited to seines of no more than 500 yards in length (excluding warp lines) when constructed of monofilament webbing (one net or in any combination of nets). Warp lines shall be no more than 1000 yards in length.

F. A net unattended or remaining in the water for more than two hours duration will be considered a gill net, not a beach seine.

III. LANDING RESTRICTIONS

Striped bass harvested in this fishery may be sold only to and purchased by a dealer possessing a 2007/2008

STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean.

IV. DEALER PERMITS

A. No finfish dealer may possess, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass taken from the Atlantic Ocean without first obtaining a 2007/2008 STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean from the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries. Dealers must abide by all conditions of the STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT and the general permit conditions found in 15A NCAC 3O .0500 et seq.

B. Only a STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean may be used for transactions involving striped bass taken from the area opened by this proclamation.

C. Striped bass lawfully sold to a permitted dealer may be resold to a non-permitted wholesale or retail market provided the initial permitted dealer records their dealer identification number on each bill of lading or receipts involved in the shipment of striped bass. Any individual or corporation who holds a current finfish dealer license must obtain a STRIPED BASS DEALER PERMIT validated for the Atlantic Ocean in order to sell any striped bass personally harvested.

V. SALE TAGS

No finfish dealer may possess, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass taken from the Atlantic Ocean without having affixed through the mouth and gill cover, an Atlantic Ocean striped bass sale tag issued by the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries. In the case of striped bass imported from other states, a similar tag that is issued for striped bass in the state of origin must be affixed.

VI. SEASON CLOSURE

The Atlantic Ocean beach seine season for striped bass SHALL CLOSE by proclamation when the total harvest from this fishery reaches 160,000 pounds or at 6:00 P.M. on January 10, 2008, whichever occurs first.

VII. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. This proclamation is issued under the authority of N.C.G.S. 113-170.4; 113-170.5; 113-181; 113-182; 113-221.1; 143B-289.52; and Marine Fisheries Rules 15A NCAC 3H .0103, 3M .0201 and 3M.0204.

B. It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Director under his delegated authority pursuant to Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3H .0103.

C. The intent of this proclamation is to allow the commercial harvest of striped bass from the Atlantic Ocean by traditional gears within the 480,480 pound quota established for the 2007/2008 season by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) Fishery Management Plan for Striped Bass.

D. The waters of the Atlantic Ocean, as applicable to this proclamation are defined as waters seaward of the COLREGS Demarcation Lines as indicated on National Ocean Service navigation charts for the areas to which this proclamation applies.

E. At the end of each three-day harvest period, the Division will review landings reports and determine if the quota has been reached.

F. Permits may be obtained from all North Carolina Marine Fisheries License Offices.

G. All striped bass taken during season closures and all undersized striped bass shall be immediately returned to the waters where taken, regardless of the condition of the fish.

H. Hook-and-line fishing equipment is not commercial fishing equipment in the striped bass fishery and it is illegal to sell or purchase striped bass taken by hook-and-line in accordance with Marine Fisheries Rule 15A NCAC 3M .0201 (b).

I. Holders of Recreational Commercial Gear License or hook-and-line fishermen must follow the bag and size restrictions of the recreational fishery for striped bass.

J. This proclamation supersedes FF-76-2007, dated December 21, 2007. The warp line length restrictions are being implemented to minimize interactions with protected marine resources.

K. Dealers whose businesses are located in Beaufort, Carteret, Craven and Pamlico counties may obtain tags by contacting the Morehead City Marine Patrol Office at 1-800-682-2632 or (252) 726-7021. Dealers whose businesses are located in Hyde, Dare, Tyrrell, Washington, Bertie Chowan, Pasquotank, Camden, Hertford and other northern counties may obtain tags by contacting the Columbia Marine Patrol at 1-800-405-7774 or (252) 796-1322. Allow 48 hours for delivery.

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at the start of the video it said JAN 9 2008 ......7 DAYS AGO......1 WEEK FROM TODAY ........Last WEEK

yup. what do you mean by that post?

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