17 posts in this topic

Like some ideas of what ya'll are using as home made scupper plugs for your SOT yak.

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Well it sure isn't going to sink, it would take a lot to sink it and I've tried. In the colder water I'd like to keep my can out of the water if possible.

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i know guys use the rubber end caps from harware stores. they are made for crutches and the like... hope this helps,

denny

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Also heard about the crutch end caps. 4 for a buck at wallyworld or the dollar store. Drill a small hole in the middle and force a piece of small nylon string thru. Tye a knot on the end and a loop on the other end. Good to go.

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The "rubber" on the bottom of the crutch cap is too thin to tie a line (string) through and be able to pull it out, it would pull through the cap. You would just flip it over and push the cap out, Not made of rubber these days and deteriorate quickly anyway. (They got cheap on us!)

Best thing I have come up with is packing foam. Not the cheap break-apart stuff, but the flexible stuff they use with heavier items.

FREE too!

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I've got a box of old corks too. All sizes. Or we could just put up the $$$ and buy scupper plugs.

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I use the foam practice golf balls, can get a box of them at dick's pretty cheap. the fit tight but you do need to poke them out from underneath unless you put a line throught them.

gary

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I used a 1 3/4" whole saw and pushed it into a 8" pool noodle and twisted a plug out. I did this a couple of times and then I glued the plugs in the holes behing and infront of my WS Tarpons seat. I sealed the holes top and bottom. I got tired of being splashed with water every time I hit a wave.

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Im not a yaker so I gotta' ask. why do they put holes in them in the first place if everyone plugs them up:D

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well the holes are there because they are supposed to be self bailing.

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Some of the holes are only used for support tubes for the seat. They will not drain the seat but when a wave hits and the scuppers jet water up in to the seat it is a real pain in the butt. Who wants to sit in a wet seat for six hours fishing. Not me so I pluged mine in front of and behind the seat. The scuppers in the foot wells I leave open and the ones in the tank well I leave open.

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Since Oliver and I share the Prowler and he uses it for yaking out to drop bait and I use it for angling in the Pocomoke - we have different expectations. You expect to get wet in the ocean, but would you want to sit in Pocomoke water all day long? Plus I have visions of snakes crawling through the holes. I just bought scruppers from Ocean Kayak. They weren't expensive and work perfectly. I had to buy small for the front holes, large for the holes behind the seat and medium for the back holes. I end up with water near my feet from what drips off the paddle, but so far the seat area and back have stayed bone dry - even after I paddle into the wake of waterski boats - since they aren't bright enough to know you are responsible for your wake! Actually, I'm practicing for my first try in the ocean . . . . :D

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Oops - I meant to say Scupper Plugs - not scuppers.

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Have you had any luck in the pokomoke?

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pool noodles are the cheapest. It's also a good idea if you are taking long trips to pack the sides of the seat with noodles. In the even that you have a leak it's good to know you won't sink. I've brought in a good bit of water on a couple rough days taking it through the hatches. 8 hours in 3 footers will get you a couple gallons if you aren't careful.

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I caught a nice bass last Thursday. I was actually in the Nassawango Creek - just a little west of where it dumps into the Pocomoke. Check out the photo I posted under Freshwater - Nice Job First Timers. I wish I would have gotten a better photo. That's the first time Oliver parted with the kayak since we bought it together and I took advantage of having it - was out there Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. The bass are there - but I'm having a hard time setting the hook. I missed several.

Back to the scupper plugs - I just want to say that whatever anybody uses - make sure they are easy to pull out. I'm having a hard time getting the kayak onto the SUV. The Prowler is wonderful - cuts through the water like a knife. I was able to paddle against the wind and incoming tide with ease - but that thing is heavy and it is a struggle for me to get it up onto the roof racks. It's even a bit hard for me to turn it over to let the water out. It is so nice to just yank the plugs and let the water drain. As I said - I'm only getting water from what drips (splashes) off the paddles - but it is enough to make the kayak heavier. Guess we weren't thinking about the fact that Oliver is 6'1" but Oma is only 5'2"!!!!!!! Good thing I'm strong.

Back to the bass question - I'm going to post a question about the Pocomoke and tides on the Freshwater Forum. Anybody out there with knowledge of bass and tides - HELP!

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