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Guest mdram

skate recipes

11 posts in this topic

Since they are a member of the shark family,,,I assume you need to bleed them,,,If so, how do you do that with this critters. The food network with bobby flay did in fact cook up some freid skate wings. Looked pretty good,,,maybe the presentation made it look good :D . I may have to give it a try,,,skinning could be a problem.

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MDRAM:

Good Information on cleaning them...

Here is how I have cooked Skate in the past...

For the skate/sand dabs:

Heat a large sauté pan over high heat, and add a small amount of peanut oil. Season the skate or dabs with salt and pepper, and lightly dust with flour. When the oil sis hot add the skate to the pan, dusted side down. (Dusted is ususally a light flour that has fresh ground pepper, sea salt--I'm on a Celtiic kick right now any sea salt will work, but Cook until slightly brown. Add 1 ounce butter- I'm more generous and turn the skate over. Gently cook for 1 minute or until done.

Then:Combine cabernet and port together in a saucepot. Simmer and reduce to half. Combine the arrowroot any store sells this its a thickening part of the recipe--with one-teaspoon water and whisk into the wine reduction. The sauce should be slightly thick or until it will lightly cover the back of a spoon. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Just a a bit over the skate and your reasy.

Its the cleaning of the skate though that I have never done...

Later,

Steve

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I thought you were gonna say, " and when finished, throw the skate in the trash can and eat the pan"... :-)

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"And throw the pan away" Funny!

I'm trying to figure out how to clean a skate... Looks like a lot of work. :chef:

Later!

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I think I may give one a shot,,,the cleaning is my only concern.

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Well, we're all experts at catching them, fairly good cooks and have no problem eating them.

Cleaning them may be a challenge, I'm terrible at skinning.

First of all, how big do they need to be to make it worth the effort?

I really do want to try them.....

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just punch the wings with a round pipe about 1 1/2 to 2 in in dia then cut off the skin. have not tryed this but heard of it being done..just my 2ct.......

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How to clean a skate:

Forget how to cook em and just learn how to catch fish like David and Scott. :v:

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interesting:

www.gortons.com

a.k.a.: Ray, rajafish

Waters:Atlantic and Pacific coastal waters

Description (in water): Two triangular, tapered "wings" (technically pectoral fins) give this unusual looking steel-gray fish, which is related to shark, graceful mobility as it seeks prey along the sea floor. A large fish, skate often exceeds 100 lbs.

Description (in market): Only the wings (fins) of the skate are edible; in each, a thin layer of translucent cartilage separates two sections of firm, lean, delicately flavored white meat. The cartilage is edible only with young, small skate. The skin is tough and not edible.

Sold as: "Wings" (fins), skinned and unskinned; whole (less common)

Best cooking: Before further preparation, skate--like its relative, shark--must be soaked in a vinegar-and-water solution; this process rids the meat of a natural ammonia odor that develops after capture.

Skate is delicious simply poached and served with a butter-based sauce. Skate with brown butter (raie au beurre noir) is a French favorite. Many cooks prefer to poach skate before further preparation (eg. sautéeing, frying), but the meat can also be steamed, broiled, or grilled.

Buying tips: Look for meat that has already been skinned, as skinning the wings yourself is extremely difficult. The wings should smell sweet and fresh. Beware of flesh that smells strongly of ammonia, which usually indicates that the fish has been sitting too long in the market (a faint trace is O.K., it will disappear after the soaking process or after cooking).

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