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Found 629 results

  1. Got a question about Rocks this happened to a friend of mine and me the same night. My Buddy had 2 nice rocks that he had caught and had on ice for 2 days I had 2 nice rocks that I had caught and had on ice for less than 20 hours we both fillet them and he cooked his one way and me another (used a crab cake res. spread it out on top of the fish and broiled them). Took em out of the oven and they looked a tad bit over cooked but nothing tooo bad. Man o man took one bite of them and the fishy taste was sooo bad and over powering that I couldn't eat another bight. Felt bad about that and put them down for the dog to eat and she couldn't even finish them. Called my buddy up the next day and he said his fish had a real bad fishy taste to them as well. When I cleaned the fish they looked good and I even cut out the dark meat on the fillet. Not sure what went wrong but was wondering if anyone has had this happen to them and what I could do in the future to make sure this doesn't happen again...Tanks
  2. There are more helpful online resources for fishing and boating than ever before. Novice or seasoned angler, there is something for everyone. From new techniques and products to the latest weather information, the sites below promise to make your fishing more enjoyable.
  3. tried fishing assateague island for the last time saturday night got skunked again as normal for the past 17 years . what am i missing other than fish . never see any thing other than small skates n shark smaller than 16'' . think i'll stick to fishing delaware's beaches , they are closer and more actual fish worth catching. WHAT AM I MISSING?!
  4. Hit Dam Neck with Non-Caster from 4:30pm - 7:30pm for last of incoming..... Grass in close was not fun, cut up and tossed the only two fresh fish we caught (1 spot, 1 croaker) and had some fun with biters. We landed 3 Sandbars from 3.5'-4' ft, I got bit off once on a run and Non-Caster lost a stud biter, probably 5ft + in the first breaker when he finally bit him off. Had his SHV spooled more than 3/4 way down if not further, before he finally got him turned. He was a stud of of the box, absolutely smoking run and such a sweet sound! Looked drummy if it wasnt for the grass!
  5. Top then outgoing tide, S-SW winds 5-10, cold upwelled dirty water first 500 yards, tons of menhaden. All you want small croaker with the occasional small spot on BWFB, one sharpnose on eel, one bite off and one screaming run while I was tossing metal that came unbuttoned. One of the loudest smoking runs I have ever had as weel, but just dropped it I guess, dang circle hooks! Ran for about 15 seconds full throttle before I got to it and too late! Stump heaver was bent more than I have ever seen it, was a nice fish whatever it was!
  6. Sent to me by Capt. Max King 37' 2010 Contender Check out this Contender that "ran aground". Boat was only 6 hours old. Operator claimed he was doing 28 knots. Both people on board were 100% sober. Cost him $10,000 to have Tow Boat US pull him back to the water. 4 tow lines parted in the process. MSRP on the boat ranges from $300,000 to $400,000 depending on options."
  7. In the past year i have witnessed some very rude and some dangerous moves made by my fellow anglers. Growing up on the Eastern Shore i had a boat at a young age. The very first thing that i was taught by my father was safety and ethics on the water. Most of these ideals that he taught were mainly common sense and courtesy toward other boaters. This past year was my first year fishing the mouth of the bay for strippers. I had a very good first season, but saw things that really bothered me. This past Saturday was just as disappointing as last winter. I had three boats drift so close to my boat that I had to push them away from me with my hands. All while the captain stared in disbelief that I was upset with him. I had my line cut, while anchored, by a boat that passed wide open by my stern within 40ft, and not to mention the wake that he threw over me. One thing that I really don't understand is how people can take the entire bay and feel the need to run at high speeds in between 20 anchored boats on their trip north or south. One of my friends I had on my boat with me is in the USCG. He told me that there is a law in place that will require boaters to have a drivers license within the next few years. I think that this is a great idea. The things I mentioned above aren't just gripes, but concerns of the safety of myself and other anglers. Some things that people can do to better the experience for everyone on the water would be to go around a group of boats that are anchored up instead of through them on your way to your destination. Be conscious of the fishing lines of others, (your hook isn't the only one on bottom). Be aware of your wake and where it is going to head once you've left the area. If it can be proven that it was your wake that caused damage, you are responsible for it. Don't drift or anchor to close to another boat. Be particularly careful when passing or motoring around a boat that contains children. I saw 2 almost get thrown off the other day when a 25ft Parker passed at 1/2 throttle no more than 50ft from their boat. I could go on all day. The bottom line is that most of the anglers out there do know these things and are respectful of others on the water, but its that ever growing percentage that can make a great day on the water aggravating or even dangerous. I'm sure that many will read this and agree. Maybe even have had similar things happen to you. To others, this may piss you off. If so, you are the problem. Keep your boat on the trailer and next to the SUV / station wagon thing.
  8. I had a friend i grew up with, Kevin, in town this weekend so i took him and the brother in law out for some spades at the CBBT. Once again the morning started off with some rough water but it laid out pretty nicely by the middle of the day. We tried my favorite spot with no luck which was a first. Then we moved around to the other side of the 4th. Within 10 minutes we had our first spade of the day. We ended up with 7 spades all a ranging from 4-5lbs. Which were larger than the previous week. We headed back to the ramp at wise piont around 1 and had another great day on the bay.
  9. So I have a 12' cabelas salt striker rod, rated 3-8oz (total bull, more like, 2-5, maybe 6) that has lost the rings out of the 3rd and 5th eyes from the top. I stuck the 5th back in, but I know I'm on borrowed time. I bought it in the bargin cave at a cabelas retail store for $50. My question is this: I've had several quotes of replacing the eyes for $9-11 an eye + cost of parts. I'm thinking of just replacing all the eyes with something higher quality. Total cost would then therefore be around $90 give or take. Making the rod more expensive than it cost new ($140 new rod vs. $120 retail). What do you think? Should I just save the $90 and save up for another rod? I really like the action and weight of the rod...but I just got a tsunami air wave 8' lure rod for the surf and I can see where one might say just scrap the thing and get something better. Thanks! Jerry
  10. Was our first trip this year caught 4 in about 2.5 hrs. The Gods smiled on us and gave one for diner The boat ran great which is an achievement all to its self and we had a great day on the H20. Can't ask for much more than that. :eusa_dance:
  11. By Captain Alan Sherman Seagrasses can be found all over the world in shallow bays, lagoons, estuaries and along coastal waters. Where there is water there are boaters navigating these waters successfully and often times not so successfully. In most areas the water is deep enough for their propellers to cut through the water without causing any damage to the bottom below them but the unsuccessful boaters that stray away from their appropriate depth of water can cause significant damage to the beds of seagrasses often unaware of how much damage they have created. As the propellers of these vessels make contact with the fragile seagrasses the propellers cut into the soft sand or mud bottoms creating a trench that is deeper than the waters adjacent to the freshly cut trench. Besides the propeller cutting the trench the propeller also cuts the fragile seagrasses leaving this deeper trench void of all seagrasses. The damage created is called a propeller scar or prop trail. A propeller scar may be just a few feet in length but can also be hundreds of yards or more in length. Almost immediately erosion of these propeller scars starts to take place making the trails wider and deeper and creating cloudy water from tidal flow and wave action. Seagrass meadows made up of one or many seagrasses such as turtle grass, shoal grass, manatee grass, star grass, widgeon grass, paddle grass and Johnson’s sea grass are very important to the shallow bays, lagoons and coastal waters all over the world because these seagrasses help provide protective nurseries and food sources for many marine species. These seagrasses also increase water qualities in the areas of the seagrass meadows and reduce wave energy along the coastlines. Columbia Sportswear, Bass Pro Shops and The Ocean Foundation have joined hands in an effort to restore seagrass meadows through education and habitat restoration. Recently I was invited take part in a two day event sponsored by Columbia Sportswear, The Ocean Foundation, Seagrass Recovery, Andy Newman, Bass Pro Shops and George Poveromo. The event was put together to bring awareness to how serious these propeller scars can be to our fragile bays, lagoons, shallow coastal waters and estuaries. During the event I had the opportunity to see firsthand propeller scars that had been accidently cut into fragile seagrass flats in Florida Bay off of Islamorada and then I got to take part in the actual repair of one of these propeller scars. With the guidance of the Seagrass Recovery project representatives, Kenny Wright and Beau Williams I was able to take part in repairing a propeller scar. Once at the sight of a propeller scar located just a few minutes from Wide World Sportsman in Islamorada it was quite obvious how bad a propeller scar actually is. I looked out on the beautiful green grass meadow only to see this horrific looking white stripe that had been cut into the meadow by a boater who thought there was more water under the propeller than there actually was. We anchored our boat and I donned a mask and snorkel and jumped into the crystal clear water that was just two feet deep. As I snorkeled the barren propeller scar it was obvious that the scar was deeper then the water surrounding it and that the seagrasses on the edge of that scar couldn’t grow into the trench. This scar was fairly new and had not grown much since the propeller scar had been created. Others joined me and then we started the repair of the propeller scar. First four foot biodegradable sediment tubes were place one at a time into the propeller scar. Once the propeller scar had been filled with these biodegradable sediment tubes long pieces of PVC tubing with wooden stands attached to the tops of the tube were driven into the ground and spaced out along the biodegradable sediment tubes. These biodegradable sediment tubes over the course of time will break down and completely fill the propeller scar bringing the depth of that scar back to its original level. The PVC tubes and stands are there to attract birds that will come and sit on the stands and eventually fertilize the area around the propeller scar with their guano. Three months after the biodegradable sediment tubes have been placed in the propeller scar, a crew from Seagrass Recovery will visit the site and plant seagrass plugs that were retrieved off the sea surface into the restored propeller scar. Twelve to eighteen months later the propeller scar will have been totally restored. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Seagrass Grow Project or would like more information on the Seagrass Grow Project than please visit these internet sites. Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) Sponsors of this Event were: Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) BassPro Shops/World Wide Sportsman (Bass Pro Shops Outdoors Online: Offering the best in Fishing, Hunting and Outdoor Products) Andy Newman, NewmanPR, the Florida Keys (NewmanPR) George Poveromo, Columbia Athlete, (George Poveromo's World Of Saltwater Fishing)
  12. Chinese mitten crabs, first reported in the Chesapeake Bay, are more widespread than initially thought. Four crabs have now been caught in Delaware Bay during the last week of May 2007, and may occur in other waters of the U.S. east coast. The "furry-looking" claws distinguish the Chinese mitten crab from native crabs. This Chinese mitten crab was caught by a waterman fishing for Blue crabs in the Upper Chesapeake Bay on May 18. (Credit: Greg Ruiz, Smithsonian) In total, seven adult male mitten crabs have been documented from the two bays since 2005. Prior to this, the potentially invasive species had never been recorded from coastal waters of the eastern United States. The mitten crab is native to eastern Asia and has already invaded Europe and the western United States, where it has established reproductive populations. The crab occurs in both freshwater and saltwater. Young crabs spend their lives in freshwater and migrate to saltwater estuaries for reproduction. Named for the unusual thick fur-like coating on its claws, the mitten crab looks very different than native crabs and is easily recognized. It is listed as injurious wildlife under the Federal Lacey Act, due to its potential to cause ecological and economic damage. "We don't know the present status of this crab along the eastern U.S. coast" said Gregory Ruiz, senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. "At the moment, it is not clear whether these crabs are reproducing or established in the Mid-Atlantic region, or whether the captured crabs are just a few individuals that originated elsewhere." These crabs may have arrived in the ballast water of ships or through live trade. A Mitten Crab Network has been established to examine the abundance, distribution, and reproductive status of crabs in Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay and other estuaries along the eastern United States. The initial partnership between the Smithsonian lab, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, is now being expanded to include resource managers, commercial fishermen, research organizations and citizens along the east coast. Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by Smithsonian.
  13. Had the day off and headed to NOB for some early season flounder tagging. According to my records, the flounder should be at the pier and begin to bite any day for this location. Arrive to a cooler than expected fog/cloud covered morning and begin to toss my 1/4 oz red jig head with a 4" chartreuse gulp alive swimming mullet. Nothing for a bit and I am talking to one other Navy Active Duty fisherman as he is using a white gulp and a chartreuse head. Both of us working the rail up and down, till I finally start getting some short flounder taps. Let them eat and finally bring up my first flounder of the year at 10" long and toss him back. That's right, no tag due to this year only flounder 12" and over get tagged. I keep getting hit on the chartreuse so I ask the Navy guy if he wants one and he accepts. Sun begins to burn off the fog and we both start working hard, but catching some more flounder in the 13"-14" range, tag them and let them go. I then had a nice fat 16"-17" flounder by a piling take me and had him almost to the rail when he got off, so I dropped my gulp right back down there. WHAM, get smacked again and as I lift the flounder off the bottom, he takes off. Managed to stay out of the pilings and get him to the surface and it's not the same fish, only one bigger. With no net around and not taking the risk, I walk him all the way down to the rocks where the Navy guy walks down and grabs him, while I beached the flounder. Flounder came in just a small bit over a keeper, so in the box he went!:blob1: Slow the rest of the time out there, but nice to get out, my guess is this inconsistent weather has the flounder a bit off for this location. Total for the day was 6 fish tagged, 1 tossed back, 3 lost at the rail and 1 keeper! Almost forgot, the Navy guy had a beautiful healthy schoolie rockfish right at 22" long whiched smacked his jig as he was pulling it out of the water. Filleted up the flounder and my son and daughter tore it up for dinner last night and even let me have some as well!
  14. Thursday’s trip was met with lots of high expectations. The tides were ideal for hunting snook and redfish. Before running to the Eastern shore of Tampa Bay we needed to gather bait. My anglers today Jim and Tom joined Captain Steven to gather bait. Unlike previous days the Skyway Bridge was lots of work, it took an hour to have just enough for the day. It was very expensive bait as I ripped 2 cast nets on barnacle encrusted pilings. Use caution when tossing a net up current of hazards. With a stronger than forecasted NE wind making the water choppy it was a bumpy ride to Bishops Harbor. Snook were nowhere to be seen; Tom had one snook explode on bait with no hookup. Jim and Tom were making great casts with no results. I decided to leave the snook behind and check out the redfish action at Tarpon Key. As we eased in on the mangroves the Captain next to us was hooked up. Moments later they were on hooked up again. We casted chunk baits along the oyster bar and waited. We saw numerous reds but did not connect. So much for plan B. About now Captain Steven was anxious to get his anglers on fish. I moved us to a shallow grass flat with and deep drop off to 10’. Again a slow start then thankfully we started catching trout. Most were beautiful keeper size spotted sea trout with many 18-22”. These beauties were thick and clearly eating like crazy. Mackerel made their appearance with one a pushing 26”. The bite was on for 15 minutes then off it was like that for an hour. Thank goodness the day ended on a positive note. Jim and Tom were great guys, good anglers and fun to have onboard. Captain Steven Markovich Tampa Bay Fishing Charters | On The Mark Charters
  15. I've fished the tournment in 2007, 2008 but not 2009... I was thinking about giving it another try (this time with my truck), but was wondering how many of you guys will take part. Also I dont have tons of experience in Surf Turnaments, but would like to know if you guys fish them differently than you would regular fishing. I've heard of some guys switching bait every 15 minutes.
  16. Renewed my Surf Permit, and have a new rod being shipped to me this week. With that being said I decided to call off sick and spend the day (thursday) fishing. I think i read the High tide will be at 8:45am; my plan is to get there around 6am, and fish to atleast 12pm before packing it up and chasing croakers closer to home. My question is do you guys know when the stores with the BAIT open up.. I read that Old Inlet opens at 7am (too late), are there others ? Side Question: I was thinking about fishing 3r's, but have fished most of the other spots. Is there any other aera procuding better than 3r's? If you see me stop by and say HI.. 2006 Gray Dodge Durango..
  17. After more than two decades away from plugging I have come back to do some rock hopping and fishing. So far I am having a great time catching schoolies. I am not sure if I every want to pick up my Lami 1502 heaver again.
  18. Flats’ fishing on Tampa Bay is in full swing. Snook, Redfish and Trout make up the Big 3 or Grand Slam on Tampa Bay inshore waters. Bait and water temperatures are finally where it needs to be and with this weeks high tides the bite should be awesome. To increase your success rate you need to first fill the live well with whitebaits. Filling the live well with frisky baits is important; you will most likely need hundreds for chumming so gather plenty. Chumming both fires up fish then keeps them fired up. This week’s high tides of 2.5’ late morning will have the snook up into the Mangrove Islands chasing bait. As the tide turns and starts to run out the snook turn on! With crabs and all kinds of goodies being flushed out from the Mangroves it triggers a feeding response. Snook are ambush predators and will set up on points and breaks waiting for bait to drift by. Be ready for explosive action the moment the bait hits the water. Most battles with snook are won or lost in the first minute as they brutes will look to get deep back into the Mangroves. The same tides will have redfish up on the flats and adjacent to Mangrove shorelines. Oyster bars along the Mangroves are perfect habitat for redfish schools. White baits free lined or under a popping cork works great. Cut baits can also be killer on redfish. White baits, threadfins and pinfish all work. Local canals and docks are also home to many a redfish. As with snook take care when approaching redfish, spooking the school can shut the bite down for hours. Spotted sea trout round out the Big 3 and are the most plentiful and easiest to catch. Lush grass flats with clear water 2-6’ will more often than not hold trout. Live shrimp under a cork keeps the bait in the target zone and out of the grass. Free lined white baits. Soft plastic jigs bounced along the bottom can be deadly. Top water and suspending hard baits are great especially when targeting larger gator trout. Trout are common 14-18” with fish over 20” a nice fish on lower Tampa Bay. Understanding your target will pay dividends and help you achieve the slam! Captain Steven Markovich Tampa Bay Fishing Charters | On The Mark Charters
  19. First let me start by saying hello to all. I am hoping you guys (and gals?) can help with my first coast fishing experience. I am making a trip to Colonial Beach this Memorial Day weekend to do a little fishing and since I only fish the rivers of SWVA I don’t have a clue what Ill need. I will be fishing off the pier and a head boat while there. Right now I use 3 different setups: x1 Garcia SORON 40 with 6lb braid on a 6'6" shimano crucial MH, x1 Shimano citica with 6lb braid on a 6'6" H&H MH, and x1 Garcia Ambassador 6500 on a 7'2" American Rod smith MH. I am assuming now I will need to buy new combos, but may be able to use my 6500 musky setup. Please all advise on combos (entry level $), lures, rigs, techniques, etc. will be more than appreciated! Thanks Shane
  20. Could be some early fish in the mix with a partial spawn going on this week, wouldn't surprise me to be 14-10 days earlier than usual this year. The big spawn will still happen over the next 3 weeks but fish from the northern bay and <acronym title="Virginia">VA</acronym> could cruise by the delmarva beaches in the next 10 days. If water temps stay up it may put them in range. miserable bay fishing reports however, stocks are WAY down over past years. Fisheries mgt needs to get their hands out of the kitty and their heads out of their arses. RAPID decline since the heyday of the striper rebound 2002-2004 ish.
  21. We left Wednesday around 10:00pm in the hopes of catching the 5:00am ferry but by Rodanthe it was obvious we'd miss by a hair so we slowed down and got some fresh supplies etc. My day had started at around 8:00 am the day before as I took a 6hr round trip to get the best bait possible with the winds we'd been having. I had a feeling there would be no bait on the islands until Thursday afternoon and I was right. I was a very popular guy on the beach with 100lbs of the hottest commodity going with the wind out of the South and made a bunch of new friends. We had lines in by 7:15 or so and we were out on the bar fishing in the crowds. Being a Delmarva meat dunker the scene just wasn't for me and I didn't have a ton of confidence in the location...although there was one real sweet spot to our left that some guys had staked out pretty good. After no sleep and getting beat around on the bar for 5 hours it was time to go, the water had climbed to 62 degrees and I figured we'd have just as good a shot putting out a Delmarva spread and fishing from shore at many of the overlooked breaks and fantastic locations on the way south. Around noon we moved with the expectation of fishing through the night. We found a very subtle spot quiet a bit north of the crowd and had no one around for 500 yds or so. We set up a 6 rod spread on the edges of the bars and hole and settled in. On this trip we fished all Barrier Island Magnum heavers that I've been working on for 18 months...they certainly tested out. For much of the trip 10oz was required in our location to stay on the edges and on the bite. I told Tyler that on the incoming we'd be in the fish, maybe not as many as the crowd south but we should find some away from the fray. Around 3:00 the doggies switched from spineys to smoothies (normally indicates warmer water and drum for me) and I knew we were close to being in the fish. Nearly exactly at the high tide mark a low rider rung spinner I was fishing bowed up in the spike and squealed off and I was in to the first drum of the trip. I have to say there is an added challenge as folks are riding by to keep a low profile with a 46" fish on but we did a pretty good job of keeping the info and location quiet save for a few folks that stopped to watch. After a long snowy winter,10 hours on the road, and being up for 34 hours it was a very gratifying fish especially in March. Tyler was Johnny on the spot with the camera as usual and no I wasn't trying to match my top and waders... There were high fives all around and some celebration beers for my first fish of the season and my first big drum on a spinning rod (which was key tossing big weights into a 20+ SE wind). About 2 hours later at dark there was a similar occurrence. By this time the water was looking real nice, the sun was low and we were tossing mongo bunker chunks thinking the fish would be in closer with the falling sun. That was indeed the case and a 48" fat and angry sansaspot drum took my bait and I enjoyed a fantastic fight at one point faking like I had tangled my lines as some fisherman drove past...can't trust a drum fisherman... As it got dark my confidence continued to climb and we lit up the rods for a long night of spring drummin'. It didn't take long for another screaming run and this time it was Tyler's turn to get in on the action on his first night fish fight. With all those lines, the wind, and the current it is almost as much work clearing the lines as it is fighting the fish but we got it done and released another March drum (about 47" this time). Reports from down the beach were sparse so we felt pretty good about moving from the mix and scoring these private hole drum. We stuck it out until around 10:00 when our eyes and bodies couldn't take it any longer. I had set up the truck for napping on the beach but we heard they were kicking folks off the night before so we opted for a room at Blackbeard's and decided to sleep in arriving for the incoming tide again after a massive breakfast at Pony Island. We didn't hit the beach until 12:00 at just about dead low tide and decided to fish until the front hit the beach right around high tide. I made the call that we'd also be leaving early rather than sticking out the 35kt NE winds and waiting until Saturday night to get back out. After our success the day before we felt pretty good about the trip and content with our three nice fish. Friday was tough fishing with 10oz sliding quite a bit on the hard 25kt SW blow, you could only get about 8 minutes with your bait in the zone before you were washed into the hole and started to get sanded in. It was quite an orchestrated system re-baiting and casting 5 rods in specific sequence with all the current, wind, and line in the water...the dozen or so dogfish didn't help either. Around 3:00 we started to get smoothies rather than spineys and an hour later I was bowed up again right on que. A 44" fish hit the beach around 4:00 and our confidence climbed again thinking of a repeat. The pic doesn't do the water justice, it looked like we were offshore it was so blue, just a beautiful afternoon...for now... Not long after I landed this fish Tyler bowed up again but the current, tangles, and fish took us well down the beach away from the camera and we released our 5th big drum of the trip. Not long after we got back as we watched the front approach I commented to Ty that every time I've been on the beach when a front line hit I bowed up almost at the instant of the weather change, 3 for 3 is more than conicidence to me so we watched the rods and the front approach knowing that all hell was going to break loose weather wise in the next 10 minutes. Sure as the sun rises just before the temps dropped 17 degrees and the wind did a 180 and increased 15kts on top of the 20kts it was pushing prior a rod doubled over and Tyler was into his 3rd fish of the trip a cheating 40" with shoulders like I've never seen on a smaller fish and it put up one hell of a fight. It was old man and the sea style as the surf began to blow 20ft in the air and it turned dark and cold in an instant. I cleared the lines knowing that we'd be packing up and heading home after 3 nice fish a piece and getting it all right for a change. We got the days, the temps, the winds, the bait, the location and the gear all dialed in. There is some pretty interesting background shots in this series, check out the front. Now 4 for 4 when a front hits the beach. Ferry ride was fun too!
  22. Fish Report 4/1/10 Toggin Along April Fools PS Opening the book for April 5th & 6th Regular Tog Trips - Boat sells out at 14 - Green crabs provided - Cabin heated (?) - Leave at 7:00 for these trips (or earlier if all are aboard--PLEASE be early so we can leave early--6:40 is great!) - Return no later than 3 - 3:30 (usually) - $100.00 buys a spot - Reservation a must, that phone number in signature - Email does not work for reservations - Call - Leave a good phone number--Cell--in case of cancellation. Tog Limit is 4 fish @ 14 inches - We encourage the release of all females under 16 (and some way bigger too!!) Fish Pool is decided by length so tagged and released fish can count too. Hi All, An interesting day on the rip. Some guys limited, one skunked, put a male back 14 pounds.. Set a pair of anchors into an ENE current first thing this morning. Not liking that; We haven't been bit in a northerly current since November. But they did bite. Sure sign of spring that; A very welcome, if ultra-fussy, bite. Finally the current slacked and, predictably, was getting ready to roll all the way around to the SSW. I don't know who arranged it - I couldn't guess: I re-set anchors favoring the current to be: Derned if that current didn't slow to a crawl and then turn right back up to the north. All the big-weather above us this week I suppose. I've only seen the current do it a few times. Different sort of April Fools.. shows what I know. The weather forecast is very nice for Monday & Tuesday after Easter--the 5th and 6th.. We're plenty ready for our inspection; Go catch some tog. Enjoy this wonderful weekend & Happy Easter. Regards, Monty PS - In case you haven't heard, the Fed closed sea bass last fall using some of the worst data sets to have ever come from MRFSS. Great Scott... I've been pounding away on that all winter ---- when the largest artificial reef on the east coast is going to be sunk this summer not 30 miles from Ocean City's inlet - The Radford Project. Mercy... History is being written all around us. What befalls my industry will either be history created with a courageous step forward; where key federal managers say, "Enough!" Or, in their accepting of the same tired arguments that brought us to this disaster, history will show how my industry sank in an economic maelstrom of management's creation; an evisceration of a traditional fishery brought about by overfishing that never happened with data that should have never seen light of day. History..
  23. I hope everyone is enjoying this very nice weather we’ve had lately. We have had a few cooler days and the wind has been blowing but for the most part; it’s a lot better than the stuff we had this winter!!! The water temps are coming up with good speed and it looks like we are getting on track for normal water temps for this time of year. There has been a good bite of Redfish and Black drum in the ICW and creeks just off the ICW. We are starting to see a few smaller Reds 14” to 21” in some of the creeks on warmer days. Most reds and black drum are hitting mud minnows and “fresh as you can get shrimp”. We use two hook bottom rigs with 2, 1 & 1/0 bait holder hooks, with the fresh shrimp. If you would like to go the artificial root, I would recommend using scented grubs. The best bet I’ve used has been Berkley Gulp and Berkley Powerbait shrimp in colors Pearl & New Penny. Jigs heads for the grubs in ¼ to 3/8 oz, colors red and black seem to be the trick. Work’em slow around docks and drop-offs on grass lines and oyster rocks. The best tides have been falling or raising but fishing closer to the lower parts of the tides. We are seeing a few small Speckled trout around Wrightsville, south of Wrightsville the bigger one’s should really start to bite any day. Grubs have been the best bet for the trout; we’re using Saltwater Assassin sea shad and shrimp patterns. Colors that have worked lately; Elec. Chicken and Chart Diamond and Chicken on a chain. Don’t forget those never fell; Mirrolure’s, in colors silver mullet and white on white. Mirrolure I like are the 17MR and 27MR in the spring. The water is still cool so don’t forget to work the lures a little slower. Look for the Specks around marsh grass lines that have oysters on the edges of them. Fresh water large mouth Bass fishing has really picked up lately, we’ve had some great day’s bass fishing in the last two weeks. We are fishing local lakes, pond and the NE Cape Fear River. The best lures have been; sinko worms rigged with no weight in colors green pumpkin, watermelon and black/red fleck. I prefer Berkley’s 5” & 7” heavy weight fat sinkworm series, I rig the worms on 7/0 wide gag worm hooks. We have also had some luck with the 17MR MirrOlure in colors 18, 49, 50 and BKGCH. I really surprised at how many saltwater lures work so well for fresh water fishing, but also how many people don’t try’em! We are catching eight to over fifth teen bass a day; sizes of a pound to over four pounds. Near shore bottom fishing is good now with catches of sea bass, ringtails and tautogs. The dog sharks are thick just off the beach too, we had over 25 sharks on the last near shore bottom fishing trip. Squid has been the bait of choice, I like squid because it stays on the hook and it’s easier to catch the bigger fish with it. I like to make my own bottom rigs for bottom fishing. I use sixty pound mono with three way swivels and 3/0 off set J hooks. A two to four once bank sinker tied to twenty pound mono, that way if it gets hung-up you can get your rig back. This kind of fishing is great for kids and beginners because it’s instant gratification; drop down and get a bite! Fishing Gear we use: Reels Penn Conquer and Sargus spinning in sizes 2000 and 4000. Spiderwire Ultra-cast braid in 10 and 15#. Rods: Ugly stick lites 6’6” and 7’ Med & Med-Heavy and the All Star ASR spinning rod ASR844S and ASR845S. Fresh water gear: Pflueger Spinning reel Supreme XT 9035XT. In Other Fishing News: Don’t forget; there are some great boat and fishing expos coming to North Carolina. If you like fishing and boats you don’t want to miss these shows and fishing seminars! Here are the one’s that myself as well as other Ranger boats pro staff members will be at this spring. April 23-25, 2010 Tex’s Tackle Spring Tackle Sale and Show. I’ll be there with PENN Reels and Pure fishing. We will have some of the new Tackle from Penn and Pure Fishing, if you have any questions about any products from Penn or Pure fishing we’ll be happy to answer them for you. June 5-6, 2010 “In the Water Fishing School” Myself, Capt. Rick Bennett and four other of the best local guides are putting on this school on. This school will be real-time hands on fishing experience! There will be one day of hands on classroom instruction and the next day on the water, real-time fishing experience. The school is limited to the first 24 participants! If you want to learn from the best local guides and see how we do it, take the time to check it out; Fishing School - Rod-Man In The Water Fishing School I’m really looking forward to being part of this school! Thanks for reading this report, if you would like to go fishing drop me a line. Book now for this coming summer fishing season and don’t forget to take a kid fishing! Good Luck, Captain Jot Owens Ranger Boats Pro Staff PENN Reels Elite Staff <a href="http://www.captainjot.com" target="_blank">Wilmington North Carolina Guided Fishing Charters Wrightsville Beach <acronym title="North Carolina"><acronym title="North Carolina">NC</acronym></acronym> Inshore Fishing Boats 910-233-4139
  24. I caught a great sunrise, I caught some air while on the jet ski, I caught some rays on a nice 70 degree day and best of all I caught some really cool pictures of the seals that have eluded me in the past. No fish for me today, here is my report. I departed Crab Creek boat ramp at Lynhaven Inlet in Virginia Beach Virginia around 0630 hrs. I anchored at the first Island of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel right before the sun came up. I was trying for Tau Tog again today and no matter were I went I could not find a bite. I was using live fiddler and hard crab for bait at the First, Second and Third Island of the CBBT. I did not go as far as the Fourth or High Rise because the wind picked up to about 20 kts by 1200hrs. There were about ten Seals hanging around the rocks of the third island and for the first time I was able get a picture of more than just their head. I had a great day and hopefully next time I will find em biting. The last two picture were of an Osprey and a Bald Eagle in my yard last night.
  25. Fish Report 3/27/10<o:p></o:p> Fish Report 3/27/10 <o:p></o:p> A Tease <o:p></o:p> A Taste<o:p></o:p> Data Broadly<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Hi All,<o:p></o:p> Snuck out Thursday and were not warmly received by schools of tautog swirling under the boat like a Tarzan movie's piranha awaiting the next tasty crab leg to fall. <o:p></o:p> No, it was a slow bite. Still chilly. I had a demon on briefly; personally lost every fish that bit. A few clients goose egged with me. One guy limited and tagged but was way off his game in-so-far as the bites he had: Don't like to use names here but his initials were Dennis. <o:p></o:p> It was just an odd bite - a tease. Tagged two short cod as well. <o:p></o:p> Sunday was another matter altogether. Best bite since late February. Four guys limited, most caught dinner, there were a pair of skunks: Pat T. took the pool when he tagged & released a 25 inch female. <o:p></o:p> It's getting ready to happen. <o:p></o:p> But first we'll take a couple more days for maintenance & CG readiness on account of weather: Resume toggin Wednesday 3/31. <o:p></o:p> We have CG inspection next week. After that I'll open a lot more days.<o:p></o:p> Very late now, this fishing has to bust loose.......<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Data-data-data! Here I want to give some simple examples of what our recreational catch estimating system was designed to do and some glaring examples of what it could never do. Entertaining with statistics is challenging at best so stick with me; I'll try to mix a few fish stories in. Our official catch-estimates are a lot of what's wrong with the fishing we have, not the fish.. The conflicts constantly resulting from poor data and its ill-advised use distract us from the fish we really have lost, fish that could use our fully focused attention; where we really do need to get to work.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Some readers will remember our Boston mackerel fishery. Triple headers, quads; Heck with a cooler, many guys would bring a trash can for the wear-you-out crazy-good fishing. It was always a big deal when local TV personality, Scorchy Tawes, would arrive at the docks come spring and interview the old timers, "When will the mackerel arrive?" <o:p></o:p> In an age before internet we had 2 or 3 days from when we first caught a load of mackerel to selling out 7 days a week.. The run usually peaked around Easter. Once we started chasing the fish north passenger numbers would fall off.<o:p></o:p> And then it would be over.<o:p></o:p> Sanding and painting 'till sea bass got thick. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Almost 20 years now, they could come back of their own accord. May yet.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> The mackerel fishing that everyone had known since boats were launched from the surf, since before there was an inlet, died when a Joint Foreign Fishing Venture circa '91 & '92 was allowed. Huge factory processors bought American caught mackerel--All They Could Get. <o:p></o:p> Although it was happening all around us and to many species, we had no notion that there could ever be an end to what always was. At that time striped bass & weakfish were the only recreational species I can remember under management. Flounder may have had a 12 inch limit; The surf-clam industry was under intense regulation. <o:p></o:p> It was then, when these last "underutilized species" were being sought, that the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC) arranged for these foreign processor ships to buy American commercially caught macks..<o:p></o:p> I think we still do not understand that just because biologists have created a coastwide stock assessment that the fish will behave to suit. We had not learned, and still have not learned, that we should never manage fish as if there were no regional separation in spawning stocks.. <o:p></o:p> With disappointingly inadequate scientific deliberation the US allowed the southern stock of atlantic (or Boston) mackerel to be overpressured with an incredible surge of fishing effort. <o:p></o:p> It has yet to come back..<o:p></o:p> Recreational clients have long-since ceased coming. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <acronym title="Maryland"><acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym></acronym>'s Pete Jensen would forever make the argument that recreational fishing is never about catch, just camaraderie. <o:p></o:p> Yeah UhHu. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Nowadays the more northern stocks, which survived just fine apparently, are taking more pressure than ever.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Ah, Wandering.. I want to use Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey (MRFSS, say Murfs) catch estimate data on mackerel to illustrate what MRFSS was designed for: Catch Estimates That Show A Trend.<o:p></o:p> See if you can spot it. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: ATLANTIC MACKEREL Maryland Rec. Landings<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1983<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 655,859<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1984<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 263,320<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 57.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1986<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 167,094<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 44.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1987<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 285,035<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 52.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1988<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 195,732<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 41.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1989<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 264,121<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 40.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1990<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 537,301<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 52.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1991<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 176,571<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 50<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1992<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 53,464<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1994<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 16,373<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 46.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1995<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 6,594<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 50.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1996<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 109,822<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 58<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1997<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 48,923<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 53.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1998<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 11,279<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 64<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1999<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 30,444<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 34.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2000<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 4,172<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 73.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2001<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 39,222<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 63.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,616<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 68.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2003<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 7,026<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 67.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> Note - 1993 is missing as are 2004 thru '09 -- I presume those are zero catches. <o:p></o:p> Point here is you can easily see a shift in catch starting in '92.<o:p></o:p> Did we really catch exactly 109,822 in 1996? Heck No.<o:p></o:p> Did we really catch exactly 537,301 in 1990? Heck No. <o:p></o:p> Did we really catch exactly zero in in 2009? Well, probably. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Trends in catch, however, are evident. That is allMRFSS was ever designed to do. Never a two month or wave by wave real time analysis: "Warning! Warning! Recreational Fishers In Sector Nine Are Approaching Fifth Week Quota!"<o:p></o:p> Um, No.<o:p></o:p> More like..<o:p></o:p> "Seems like the recreational catch on mackerel dropped off pretty fast after the factory processors were let in; Do you think we screwed up?" <o:p></o:p> That was its design. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> But we are using MRFSS for real time analysis. <o:p></o:p> No manager I know has ever pondered the lost mackerel fishing.. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> For this report I tried to access our historical landings of red hake too; called them ling or lingcod. Used to be up on the recreational statistics site. Fishery's gone & now the data's gone as well; I think both are restorable, the data far more simply...<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Very importantly, the PSE or percentage standard error that you see to the right of each catch-estimate in the chart above represents the real statistical answer. Political polls would be scrapped if they exceed 4% PSE. To them 4% represents a very high margin of error. <o:p></o:p> Yet throughout MRFSS there are numerous examples where the PSE is above 50%.. Even 100% PSEs occur. <o:p></o:p> Still & importantly, a statistician will say that is the answer, that the centerpoint is only a number that represents a large field where a true number might be found. <o:p></o:p> Statistically perfect or nearly so: I'm sure the internal policy of using the statistical centerpoint as if it were hard-data is where recreational fishing's troubles source; That when the centerpoint wanders far above the correct number, beyond and inexplicably higher than any other catch-estimate, the system fails.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Now, just for something out of left field, how could we fairly allocate these Atlantic mackerel with recreational Catch Shares? <o:p></o:p> Popular right now; lot of folks think Catch Shares are the new answer to fisheries restoration. I might too without a sense of how fouled-up the data is, how lacking some management plans are in basic understanding of the managed species' behavior; In a world without waves the paper & flat-screen calculations all look so good. <o:p></o:p> If we use MRFSS to permanently divvy-up recreational catch, some are going to hit the jackpot, others will get robbed. The chances that mackerel will be divided up using a 5 year average from the 80s is miniscule.. I wouldn't possibly have enough landings to qualify for a catch-share of mackerel in the last decade, despite that I fully participated before the collapse; And didn't create it.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Ok-Ok. Catch shares another day. Fast forward a piece. You have seen in many of my past reports examples of summer flounder and black sea bass data that are accepted and used by management; Yet those data sets are thought laughable---in most anguished fashion---by fishermen.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> This catch estimating program, MRFSS, that was supposed to show by general trend how recreational fishing was doing now needs be as a predator drone with real time transmitted aerial surveillance to satisfy the needs of modern managers.. It's not about where the enemy was an hour ago, it's where they are now: Not rec-fishers catch-trend of the last 72 months, managers now want the last 72 hours.<o:p></o:p> MRFSS, however, is still equipped with black & white film that has to be delivered, developed & analyzed.. Apparently the enemy has infiltrated the system too, is frequently creating diversionary decoy data sets that send staff off to create trouble within our ranks--Closures. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> We know MRFSS is over-tasked, that's why the new federal registry system was developed to take over -- MRIP. <o:p></o:p> Folks I know on the inside do not think MRIP will necessarily deliver speedier data; Its enhancement of our present system will come as a much better estimate, almost a hard number, of participants.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Because field interviewers give a broad spectrum of pure catch data--what really got caught by an individual angler in a face to face interview. MRFSS must then take fantastic guesses of how many people participated: Here is where the system occasionally flies apart. MRIP, with its Angler Registry, will have a much better idea of how many people went fishing; can call them...<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Simply smoothing the data, removing the flyers, should be enough for all but the most high-pressure fisheries. Adding truth to catch estimates will preclude the most contentious management: Where bad data leads to poor governance, better data must lead to improved governance.....<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Now I'll present some for-hire tautog numbers that I think would certainly interest anyone who has read this far. Party and charter boat catch only here - I know quite a bit about it because <acronym title="Maryland"><acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym></acronym> has only one seaside inlet. Managers must think there are crazy pulses of fishing effort - that our clients demand one species or another but almost never two years in a row.. Scroll down through this real data.<o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: TAUTOG Maryland Charter/Partyboat<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1981<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 4,670<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 65.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1983<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,126<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 57.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1984<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 36,008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1985<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 486<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1986<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 5,476<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 64.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1987<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 765<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1988<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 14,849<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 63.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1989<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,150<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 52.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1990<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 541<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 61.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1991<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,413<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 47.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1992<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,354<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 84.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1993<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 8,652<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 44.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1994<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 19,314<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 37.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1995<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1,799<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 66.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1996<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 216<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 81.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1997<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,461<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 67.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1998<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1,235<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 62.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1999<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,604<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 63<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2000<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1,165<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 90.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2001<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,635<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 60.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 17,650<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 39.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2003<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 6,532<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 26.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2004<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 6,439<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 26.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 5,693<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,969<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 14.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 9,417<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 25.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 5,572<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 16.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 11<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 90.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Dang! <o:p></o:p> Eleven fish in <acronym title="Maryland"><acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym></acronym> for 2009 in the entire for-hire industry? <o:p></o:p> Whaaaaat....<o:p></o:p> That certainly requires adjustment.. maybe move the PSE up a couple digits? What if that got thrown into a recreational catch-share average? <o:p></o:p> We all did at least some toggin last fall. Cbass closed, had to target tog. There is no excuse for an estimate this low. <o:p></o:p> Crazy.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> The catch shown in this table in 1988 & 1994 never happened. <o:p></o:p> At all. <o:p></o:p> Nor the decline from '94 to '96.<o:p></o:p> The catch in 2002 is fantasy; We were solid into some of the the best sea bassing I'd ever seen. Maybe 10 guys on the planet can fish a crab while doubles of nice sea bass are coming over the rail. There were no party boat trips targeting tog at all in 2002.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Eleven fish.. It was a proportionally similar --but opposite-- data failure that was used to close sea bass by emergency regulation last fall. <o:p></o:p> ..despite that we turn in a 6 layer deep carbon-copy catch data form taken on a day-by-day basis: Mail it to 'em.. <o:p></o:p> There really is no excuse for saying <acronym title="Maryland"><acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym></acronym> Charter/Party caught 11 tog last year. <o:p></o:p> It is a gigantic Screw You - Fishers have never fought the data and won - MRFSS says we caught 11 fish or 8 million - They always win.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Still, here's an easy one, 11 tog, a slam dunk--multiple eyewitness--error. Almost 30 years of data though.. You see a spike in 1984. Happened too. It kept right through the next year in real-life, but that got missed in the data. They didn't pick up on the fact that the surge in tog effort continued for 2 1/2 years. <o:p></o:p> I remember - was working deck - netting peoples fish - would catch big tog on diamond jigs when the day's crabs were gone. <o:p></o:p> With no limits on a species with a narrowly defined and shrinking habitat -- We crushed 'em.<o:p></o:p> And then our tog catch stayed very, very low and flat for about 2 decades. Wasn't the commercial bad guys - We did it.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> In 2003, after over a decade of a self-imposed 3 fish at 16 inches limit, a hard lesson learned about habitat and fishing pressure, and having failed in an effort to get <acronym title="Maryland"><acronym title="Maryland">MD</acronym></acronym> to go with a larger size limit in the ocean to increase egg production; We resumed tog fishing with the State's 5 fish at 14 inches limit. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> I could pry this farther apart by researching my own logs but you can see again that trends are evident in the party/charter data though not perfectly so: OK, it's very poor here, but evident if you have background knowledge---perfectly evident that some estimates are just wrong at least. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Another Then: The slipperiest data sets are almost always the private boats--except when shore estimates go badly wrong. Here's the set for private boat ocean fishing for tautog -- does not include the back-bay or jetties. Watch for consistency. (but don't hold your breath)<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: TAUTOG Maryland Private Boat - All Ocean Combined<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1982<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 8,507<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 100<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1987<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 62,758<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 69.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1988<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 64,332<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 68.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1989<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 910<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1990<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 438<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 75.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1991<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 282<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 100.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1992<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 7,971<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 43.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1993<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 6,913<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 30.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1994<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1,215<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 100<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1995<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 4,747<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 100.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1997<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20,859<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 49.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1998<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,713<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 71.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1999<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2001<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 5,952<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 91.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2003<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 538<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 93.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20,082<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 75.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1,350<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> Hmmm.. I'd call HS on the whole data chart. That means Highly Speculative and has nothing to do with what gets cleaned from a horse's stall.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> I'd wager 1991, 2003 & 2008 are the best sets here. Remember, this estimate does not include the jetties and such, just the ocean. <o:p></o:p> The 1987 & '88 sets are hallucination; There were maybe 40 private boats that might target tog, less than a dozen were serious about it.. <o:p></o:p> Zero caught in '99 - Zero again in 2002 - 2004, '05 & '06 are zero by omission: And 20,082 were caught in 2007? <o:p></o:p> This is precisely the type of data that is being used to destroy the recreational fishing industry...<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Below is Everybody in Maryland's Tog Effort --Boats, Shore, For-Hire-- Everybody. See what you spot..<o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: TAUTOG Maryland All Areas/All Effort<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1981<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 4,670<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 65.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1982<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 35,105<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 61.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1983<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2,126<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 57.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1984<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42,835<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 51.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1985<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 486<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1986<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 5,476<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 64.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1987<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 90,523<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 53<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1988<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 107,570<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 45.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1989<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 34,709<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1990<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 45,467<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 26<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1991<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 26,770<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 36.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1992<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 106,255<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 35<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1993<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 60,231<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 30.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1994<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 157,260<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 31.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1995<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 43,542<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 36.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1996<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 9,695<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 43.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1997<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 85,682<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 34.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1998<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 6,512<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 45.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1999<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20,180<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 44.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2000<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20,129<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 50.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2001<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 23,715<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 40.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42,038<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 29.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2003<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 13,555<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 31.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2004<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 14,049<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 55.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 39,993<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 48.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 14,314<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 48.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 107,061<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 30.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 24,127<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 28.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 38,194<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 34.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> You may well remember in 2007/08 when we had to pick an "Option" with which to take our mandatory reduction; That because we had "Over Fished Our Quota" in 2007 we would be allowed less the following year.. I spent maybe an hour trying to refute the data. <o:p></o:p> No Mercy. <o:p></o:p> Irregardless how obvious the implausibility of the data, managers won't even fight it. Policy is to use the centerpoint: Subordinates need a paycheck and will use the data as ordered. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Their defense: The data Couldbe right. Just add more fishers - lucky ones at that. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Lots of people want to add greater and greater layers of complexity to our data collection; Make it real-time like the hi-tech surveillance on an Afghanistan hillside's battlefield. <o:p></o:p> I think greater complexity leads to higher expense and often to failure.<o:p></o:p> Were we to take the hic-ups out of the MRFSS flounder, sea bass & tautog data we'd have management flowing along fairly well. <o:p></o:p> Remove data sets that are only supported by managers under duress of job loss and fishers wouldn't be in such trouble. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Instead though, managers are running around from emergency to emergency, fishers are trying to cope with closures in the great recession; A great embattlement over the sourest of data sets ensues.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Below are the MRFSS sea bass tables that I think were pivotal in closing our season last year. They're self explanatory. Yet these are some of the data sets that have taken our sea bass season from 11 months to 3 months. We really need fairhanded governance here.<o:p></o:p> Words on paper can change how numbers on paper are used. <o:p></o:p> Then we can get back to fixing where the fish live, a place where paper has, thus far, been nearly useless. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> We did not overfish. <o:p></o:p> Sea bass habitat remains undiscovered.<o:p></o:p> Habitat fidelity remains unused in a coastwide management approach.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> The very worst that can happen is we go back to a size/creel/season that we know rebuilt sea bass and other species for well over a decade. <o:p></o:p> Sacrificing an entire industry in worship of MRFSS data is shameful. <o:p></o:p> There's a new team in place that can fix it.<o:p></o:p> Ought to. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Fishery Closed: Shifting fishing effort to whatever remains open then retards progress in other restorations. <o:p></o:p> The fishing public's faith in governance goes lower.<o:p></o:p> Lifetimes of work are destroyed by complex calculation without the simple posit: Could this catch estimate possibly be correct?<o:p></o:p> See cbass data below. I'd wager any would see what I'm talking about.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Needs Fixin. <o:p></o:p> We need our sea bass season back.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Regards,<o:p></o:p> Monty<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 Morning Star Fishing<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: BLACK SEA BASS - <acronym title="Massachusetts"><acronym title="Massachusetts">MA</acronym></acronym> - Private Boats - Wave 4 - July/August <o:p></o:p> 1,122.28% Increase<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 43,478<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 42.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 27,518<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 44.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 13,062<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 71.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 13,548<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 69.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 165,595<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 25.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: BLACK SEA BASS -<acronym title="Massachusetts"><acronym title="Massachusetts">MA</acronym></acronym> - Partyboat - All Areas - Wave 3 - June/July<o:p></o:p> 14,564.64% Increase<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 204<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 32<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 74<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 31.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,015<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 31.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 526<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 19<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 77,136<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 32<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Wave 2 <acronym title="New Jersey"><acronym title="New Jersey">NJ</acronym></acronym> Party Boats - March/April<o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: BLACK SEA BASS<o:p></o:p> 15,230.5% Increase<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 61<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 71.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 30<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 99.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 134<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 100.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 20,543<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 37.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> Wave 2 March/April - From 1998 to 2009 - New Jersey, Private Boats<o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: BLACK SEA BASS<o:p></o:p> 942.2% Increase<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 9,921<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 92.9<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 3,302<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 74.1<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 34,418<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 56.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <table style="" class="MsoNormalTable" border="1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="3"> <tbody> <tr style=""> <td style="border: medium none; padding: 0.75pt;" colspan="3"> Species: BLACK SEA BASS - Private Boats - New York<o:p></o:p> 455.2% Increase <o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> Year<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> HARVEST (TYPE A + B1)<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> PSE<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 1999<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 23,711<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 62.8<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2000<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 13,179<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 66.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2001<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 0<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2002<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59,718<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 55.3<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2003<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59,282<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 25.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2004<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 4,852<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 59.6<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2005<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 17,591<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 95.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2006<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 58,051<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 81.4<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2007<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 12,461<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 89.7<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2008<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 15,320<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 47.2<o:p></o:p> </td></tr> <tr style=""> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 2009<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 85,056<o:p></o:p> </td> <td style="padding: 0.75pt;"> 36.5<o:p></o:p> </td></tr></tbody></table>