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Found 242 results

  1. As usual, I read through the many fishing reports and see the amazing pictures of anglers proudly posing with their catch. By the time I have finished looking at the photos for the fourth time, the “fishy” part of my brain is creating a new list of excuses that may convince my wife to let me go fishing. Once I have finished explaining how the tide will be perfect for the next few hours, the weather forecast could not get any better and the tackle shop just received fresh bait, she usually gives her approval. In a rush to get out the door before she changes her mind, I find myself quickly going through my mental list of surf fishing necessities. Before I know it, I am on the sand wishing I had spent a little more time on that mental list. Depending on where you fish, having to run back to your house or the nearest tackle shop may not be a big deal, however if you fish areas like the southern end of Assateague Island, having to admit to your fishing buddy how you managed to forget the bait knife is not a good feeling. Some anglers like to step out for an hour or two and they don’t need to take much with them. On the other hand, if you are like me and can’t help but fish until it hurts, there are many items you can bring that will ease the pain. First of all, make sure you know the license requirements, regulations and creel limits for the beach you will be fishing. It is also a good idea to keep a fish species reference guide with you to help identify your catch. If you are not sure what you have caught, safely remove the hook and get it back into the water as fast as possible. A good photo will last much longer than any fish you will catch, so don’t hesitate to snap a quick picture. You will need something to help carry your gear through the soft sand. A surf fishing cart can be a great investment for fishing spots such as the North end of Assateague Island. On some beaches, such as the federal side of Assateague Island, you are allowed to drive your vehicle on the beach. This is very convenient for longer fishing trips that require more fishing gear. Of course you will need your surf fishing rod and reel, sinkers, hooks, and other basic fishing tackle. Choosing the type of tackle needed always depends on the species of fish you will be targeting. There are numerous options when it comes to choosing your tackle, however don’t let it overwhelm you. Your best bet will be checking out the fishing reports on the Internet and spending some time talking to the folks at our local tackle shops. They will be able to help you get an idea which rigs are best for your tackle box. You are going to need a cooler with ice to keep your bait fresh. It does not take long for the sun and warm air to dry out even the freshest bait. In the spring, the most commonly used baits, such as bunker or peeler crabs are going to need to be cut into pieces, so having a strong, serrated knife and cutting board are essential. The springtime sun can feel very warm at home; however the ocean breeze can feel surprisingly cold! Make sure you dress appropriately and have a good idea of the weather forecast. Even on those cloudy days, you will get sunburned so don’t forget sunscreen. Having a hat and a pair of polarized sunglasses will not only help with the sun’s glare on the water, it will also keep you from getting the painful “squint eye” headache. Wearing a comfortable pair of waterproof waders will certainly help keep your legs warm and dry when that unexpected wave sneaks up on you right in the middle of your cast. After you have heaved your bait into the surf, you are going to need a sturdy sand spike to hold your rod. When choosing your sand spike, make sure the bottom of your rod easily fits into the sand spike. In my opinion, the longer the sand spike, the better. You will need to shove it down into the sand far enough to be able to put pressure against it without it falling over. As the tide comes in and the sand becomes soft, make sure you frequently check your sand spike to ensure it does not move easily. One of the most common critters you are likely to catch is the Clearnose skate. Trust me, having a quality pair of needle nose pliers and fishing gloves will come in very handy when removing the hook from these spine covered bottom dwellers, as well as many other fish. Being able to sit down and rest while you wait for that record fish to swim by will make your trip much more enjoyable. Although your cooler can also serve as a seat, I recommend a lightweight beach chair with a cup holder. It’s always a good idea to bring something to eat and plenty of fresh water for drinking and washing your hands. Most importantly, you must remember you will be in constant contact with things that can hurt you if you fail to respect them. Think about it, you are dealing with sharp hooks and lead weights that are being hurled at incredible speeds. Be aware of the power of the ocean and the heat of the sun. There is always the possibility that you will have to unhook many different types of critters and just about all of them have some sort of natural defense. Excitement and adrenaline can take over very quickly when surf fishing and you have to remember to stay focused. Always have a first-aid kit and cell phone, especially if you are fishing alone. Although it may not be on your list of surf fishing gear, being safe is without a doubt the last thing you want to forget. Whenever possible, bring a friend with you. Not only can they help you untangle that spiny dogfish from your line, but in my opinion, sharing a good day on the beach with a buddy is a reward in itself.
  2. I was wondering how far out do I have to go to catch some sharks. 2-5 foot sharks will be my range. I can take my boat out about 15 miles. Do I anchor or drift? What pound test? Thanks
  3. A bunch of friends and I are heading down to Assateague March 13th through the end of the weekend. I an experienced fisherman but I've never been to the island. I've been doing research and was wondering is someone could tell me what I could expect to catch that time of year down there. I've seen a lot of the shark pictures and have the kayaks to bring bait far out but wanted to know if they'll even be active in-shore that early. Also I know most guys are tight lipped when it comes to spots but if someone could point me in the right direction as far as location it would be much appreciated although I'm not sure that that is really possible when it comes to surf fishing. Thanks for any help.
  4. Went to <acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island">RI</acronym></acronym></acronym> on our little 3 day family trip we do every year.Camped at Burlingame.Got there Thursday and set up camp.Friday morning we launched out of the Charlestown Breachway and headed to Block Island.The sky was overcast I sea was clam and like glas.I have never seen it like that.We have wanted to head out there for a few years.We have got fish off Nebraska Shoal,but,the guy in the bait shop kept telling up to go to the block.We got there and there was 50 boats or so fishing the self.I dropped a Diamond jig and Bam,I got a 6 lb Blue.We hammered fish till noon BIG blues Keeper Stripers (no monsters) some Dogfish and a Skate or two. We headed over to Fisherman's Point around 1 pm.Met the family,had lunch.Then we loaded the boat with our 2 boys and all the Scuba gear.Took them out to the Shoal.It was there first open dive in the ocean.We sat on the boat while they we down.It sucked sitting there ,but,I was on the water and .oh well.They came up after 20 mins or so ,telling us of the HUGE Stripes and Blues they saw and an abundance of other sea life.Pretty cool.Just as they came up ,the sky got dark.We headed in and half way back we got HAMMERED! We got to the boat ramp,it was low tide.I jumped off the boat bare foot,stepped on the ramp.Next thing I knew I was getting picked up off the concrete ramp.I went down hard.Cut up my hand ,and I'm hurting still. We loaded up and head to Galilee got 6 lbs of Steamers and headed back to camp/I washed the Steamers and let them sit in cornmeal till the next day. Saturday we headed out in the am again .After a night of soaking thunder storms.The sea was 2-3 ' waves.We headed to Block Island again.Rough LONG ride out there.We fished the same spots.About 70 boats out there.We didn't get any Stripers but,I got a PB Blue fish at 15 lbs!What a fight!The sea calmed down around 10 and so did the fishing.We hung till noon and went back to camp.The boys picked up 6 1 1/2 -2 lbs Lobsters.We went back to camp and had a seafood feast fit for a King.Plus Pork chops, baked potatos, best corn on the cob I have had so far this season, we got at a farm stand by Matunik exit off rt 1..Just as we finished eating.the sky started to darken.We had checked the weather for last night and Sunday.It said rain.So ,we packed up and headed home.Just as we left the sky opened up again.
  5. The weather is still warm to hot and the fishing is the same, some days warm; some day we have hot fishing. The water temps in the area are getting to late July temps already in June; I believe this is going to give us a summer trend of fishing for most of the season. To the fishing report>>>. We are still seeing so good numbers of Cobia around the area waters. The Cobia are around the inlets, shoals, and bars just off the beach. We are also still seeing them offshore a bit; around hard bottoms and reefs. Live bait has been the key to the bigger fish lately. Smaller Cobia have hit jigs around the inlets and ocean sand bars. Sight casting live bait to bigger Cobia just off the beach has produced some nice Cobia form Carolina Beach to Topsail. When we drift fish for Cobia, we are using carolina rigs with three to four once egg sinkers and 7/0 circle hooks with an eighty pound Berkley big game mono leader. The baits we are using are small Bluefish, Mullet, and Menhaden. The Flounder fishing is really starting to pick up. We are seeing Flounder inshore as well as just off the beaches. The places we look for Flounder are in the ICW, Cape Fear River and Creeks off the ICW. Look for drop offs on the edge of the main channel with current or any where baitfish are passing by. Most of the Flounder are eating little menhaden and Mud minnows on light Carolina rigs. The Flounder are mixed in size to just under keeper size to a few over five pounds. We have caught some Flounder on Artificial baits as well. We have had the best luck with Berkley Gulp 3” pogy in pearl white and smelt colors. Rig the grubs on a red or black jig head for best results. We have had some great Sharks fishing trips in the last two weeks; the bigger fish are just starting to show up. We are already even starting to see a few Hammerheads just off the beach. Shark fishing will be good until early October. Best baits for the near shore sharks are, fresh and live Menhaden. When we use bait to catch the sharks we use spinning reels, with 300+ yards of thirty and fifty pound Spider wire Ultracast braid. Rigging the baits; eight feet of 80 pound mono leader; some will wind on to the reel. Connected the 80 pound mono to a fifty pound swivel, then to Two to three foot of #9 SS wire and an 8/0 or 9/0 off set J hook. If you prefer Fly fishing, I like Striped bass flies in Menhaden patterns with 4/0 and 5/0 hook sizes. We use ten to twelve weight set ups; have lots of extra flies with you! When Shark fishing gets good, it’s not long before we start to see some Tarpon in the area. We have seen some nice schools of Tarpon pushing up the beaches in the last two weeks. Tarpon fishing in North Carolina can be very fun but it can be a challenge to get one to bite! We fish for Tarpon on the bottom or free lining, using live and fresh dead baits like; spots, bluefish and Menhaden. We are rigging these baits on fish finder rigs, with three to five feet of 80 to 100 pound mono leaders. Circle hooks are the best bet for good hook ups and landings for Tarpon in hook sizes 7/0 to 9/0 depending what hook series you like. I have also had a fair share of Tarpon on my kite rig with live baits like greenies, bluefish and menhaden. Nothing like seeing a Tarpon hit kite baits! Redfish are still biting well, but with all the hot weather its best to go early in the morning or later afternoons when the water is a bit cooler. Topwater lures and rattling corks in the shallow waters earlier mornings and afternoons will produce some Redfish. Working grubs like Berkley Gulp later in the day in deeper waters will also produce Reds for ya. Sometimes it can be just like colder mouths, slow down your presentation a little when the water gets hot. Give the Redfish a little more time to catch up with your bait. A few other fish that are biting lately; Spanish mackerel bite has been hit or miss lately. The best catching have been earlier in the morning and casting jigs and spoons to jumping fish, has put most of the fish in the boat lately. The Sheephead bite has really picked up in the last few weeks, fishing around bridges, pilings and bulkheads will produce some nice Sheephead. Off the beach from five to fifth teen miles the King Mackerel and Mahi are showing some. Fast trolling Ballyhoo or slow trolling lives baits a working for the Mackerel and Mahi. There has also been a few Sailfish caught as well lately in the same areas. Fishing Gear we use: Reels Penn Conquer and Sargus spinning in sizes 2000 and 4000. Spiderwire Ultra-cast braid in 10 and 15#. Rods: Ugly stick lite 6’6” and 7’ Med & Med-Heavy and the All Star ASR spinning rod ASR844S and ASR845S. Cobia, Shark and Tarpon: Spinning setup Penn Conquer 7000 with an Ugly Stick Tiger lite Jigging rod 6’ 6” and Penn 320LD Reel and a Tiger lite jigging rod. Line for Cobia, Shark and Tarpon: Berkley Big Game 30# mono and 50# Spiderwire Stealth High-Vis Yellow. Thanks for reading this report, if you would like to go fishing drop me a line. Book now for this coming summer fishing season and don’t forget to take a kid fishing! Good Luck, Captain Jot Owens Ranger Boats Pro Staff PENN Reels Elite Staff Wilmington North Carolina Guided Fishing Charters Wrightsville Beach <acronym title="North Carolina">NC</acronym> Inshore Fishing Boats 910-233-4139
  6. It was a great day yesterday, the weather was perfect and the fish were plentiful. I took Chad Baniowski of Williamsburg Virginia out to the Chesapeake Light Tower. Chad is a Chef at Berrets Seafood Resturant in Historic Williamsburg so I am looking forward to getting some new recipes for ways to cook Spades from him. I had been telling him all about Spadefish and spear fishing and he was eager to give it a try. We departed Rudee Inlet around 0930 and went straight to the tower, it was nice, there was not another boat in sight so we had the tower to ourselves. The current was ripping but the visibility was decent at about 15-20 feet. There were tons of spade fish and we saw quite a few Amberjack as well. Chad speared his first spadefish and we were able to get our limit of 8 after a good workout of fighting the strong current and swells. Chad also tried some jigging but could not get one of the Jacks to bite, I am sure a live bait would have done the trick. About the time we were leaving two other jet skis showed up to try and catch some fish (I may be starting a jet ski trend). We were back at the ramp and on the road around 1530, just in time for rush hour traffic. Ha. The Chesapeake Light Tower is about 16 miiles off shore from Virginia Beach. I carry a Spot GPS Tracker with me here is the link to one of my "Spots" showing the Lat/Long of the tower. http://fms.ws/3BiSy/36.90466/\-75.71265 It was another great day, here are some of the pictures I took while out.
  7. My wife and i left wise point yesterday around noon and headed out to the bridge. The water was like glass and it wasn't to hot. We got to the high rise and found a slack tide so we tried drifting clam around the pilings with no luck so we headed out to the 4th island. Tried 2 favorite spots with no results and didn't see the large schools of spades that everyone has been seeing. The water was erie and we never had a good tide pick up. We tried some bottom fishing for bait and could hold the bottom in 40ft of water with a 1oz sinker. Before heading in we tried the high rise again and this time managed two 5 LB spades. I did catch one 2LB blue at the bayside of the fourth and we saw a couple flounder caught but overall it looked like a slow day. Although it was one of the prettier days at the mouth of the bay.
  8. hey guys im thinking of doing some sharking off of A.I tonight at one of the walk on spots sense i dont have a 4X4 permit. If anyone is going to be out give me a shout and maybe we can hook up and wet a line or two!!! cell - 717.991.3882
  9. I recently moved down to GA and like to surf fish when I can. I'd like to try and surf fish down here on weekends, but don't really know of any surf fishing spots, towns, or the regulations. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
  10. Springtime has progressed to the hot weather of summer. Along with this change comes changes in the fishing. With a few changes in techniques, the action will continue to keep fish pulling on the line and anglers smiling. Offshore, the search for dolphin becomes a matter of covering more ground and sometimes traveling further offshore. In on the reef, the downrigger and bottom outfits will start producing better than the flat lines on most days. You can expect action with kingfish, AJ’s, and muttons on the bottom rig. Bonito become the predominant fish and will leave many anglers with sore arms and backs. Inshore, the tarpon action out along the beach has slowed down. The good news, however, is that they are in the Bay and feeding with a vengeance. With all that said, let’s get caught up again with the individual trips aboard Knot Nancy. Alex and his friends caught dolphin offshore before motion sickness took over and we had to run back in to calmer water. The fish were under birds and around floating debris. The next evening, the same group caught tarpon at Government Cut on the south side using crabs. James, Mark, and Sharon Banta picked a beautiful weather day for their dolphin trip. Searching was the name of the game and changing techniques produced once we found the fish. The schools were small and didn’t want to stick around to long before moving on. At one point it took switching to trolling small lures to get them going. James got to catch a few fish on his fly rod much to his delight. On the way in we found a very good weed line and that’s where we found a larger school of fish that stayed around longer. A fish fry with dolphin fillets was the plan for that evening. Sherman Gambill and Andy Sun took good advantage of the afternoon/evening trip that I offer. We had to work hard to fill the livewell with bait, but it got accomplished after three bait spots were visited. Within minutes of putting out the first baits and slow trolling, we had action with bonito that kept both anglers busy. Once we made it out to the depth I wanted to start in, a drift was set up. The flatlines saw first action in the form of dolphin in 180’. Andy got the 18 pound fish and Sherman caught the schoolie. The bottom rod saw action with a mutton snapper. The wind finally picked up enough to fly the ex-light kite which produced a barracuda for Andy and Sherman’s first sailfish. We capped off the trip with tarpon action at Government Cut with Sherman catching his first tarpon. The next trip to Government had Aaron Demers catching and releasing a permit and Jeff Demers catching his first tarpon. In the Bay, we jumped one tarpon before calling it an evening, Richard Chase and his grandson Rick fished a late afternoon trip that started slow and picked up speed as the trip progressed. We started straight out from Government Cut with the action being slow. When the north current pushed us to the middle of the Anchorage area, things changed quickly. Slow trolling herring in 90-120 feet gave us steady action with kingfish on the flatlines. When that action slowed, we moved out to 180 feet and as soon as I set Knot Nancy into a drift, the downrigger popped and the kingfish action picked back up again. Meanwhile, the flatlines also got hit and both Richard and Rick were very busy with bent rods and line screaming off their reels. Besides the kingfish, the bonito also got in on the action too. The last evening trip made to Government Cut for tarpon was with Robert Oldin and his friend Mike. Neither had caught a tarpon and were eager to do battle with one. The action along the beach was non-existent. After the tide changed and it got dark, we moved into the Bay and things changed quickly. After setting up and putting out the baits, it only took about 5 minutes for the craziness to start. The tarpon pulled hard, jumped a lot, and had the anglers running around the boat. When it was time to head back to TNT Marine Center, the final score was 4 for 4 with two very amazed and happy anglers. Knot Nancy is currently at Birdsall Marine getting a new upholstery make over. My next scheduled trip is on July 18. In the meantime, call or email to get your trip scheduled to take advantage of the good Bay tarpon and reef action. Captain Dave Kostyo Knot Nancy Fishing Charters, Inc 305-965-9454 Charter Fishing in Miami and Miami Beach for Sailfish, Tarpon, Dolphin and Kingfish aboard the Knot Nancy nkostyo@bellsouth.net
  11. coming down in one month and staying approx 1 mile south of the food lion in corolla. i have some surf gear and am going to try to get down to the pier in nags heads, but does anyone know of any good spots on the bay up in duck or corolla i could fish off a dock? thanks
  12. i will be vacationing in portland, maine for the last week of july. i am wondering if anyone can inform me on "on shore fishing" in the area. any information is welcomed....i.e.- spots, tackle, targeted species, surf fishing, fly fishing, gear (willing to purchase all necessary equiptment), regulations, bait shops, fresh/saltwater....etc. thank you for your responses!!!!! --steve
  13. Walk outside breath in the air and tell me this isn’t the beginning of April instead of the beginning of May! I know that’s what I was thinking! The fish too! Turn your clock back a month and that’s the best way to explain why the fishing is the way it is today. The weather patterns that we have had this year have pushed back the calendar a whole month and the fish are responding as if it was the beginning of April not May. That’s OK because if you haven’t had a chance to get out on the water recently then you still have time to take advantage of mild conditions and the Spring Migration. Fishing has been very good to say the least with the one exception being in Flamingo. I say that about Flamingo with a hesitation in my voice because all we need for Flamingo to take off is a few days of calm conditions and winds from the east. Recent strong winds from the northeast and east have been good for the Miami areas but not so much for Flamingo where water conditions have been very rough and dirty. Fishing out of Miami has been very good even if the weather at times has not. I have had an opportunity to fish with my family quite a bit and also filled in the free days with charters to fill the week. Air temperatures have risen and during the past weeks we have had winds from the south to east at 10 to as much as 25 miles per hour so we have had to get creative in finding waters that will give us enough protection to fish and still be comfortable. Thankfully I have been fishing the areas that I fish enough to know where those spots are. Fishing in North Biscayne Bay has produced great catches of Sea Trout to over four pounds on live pilchards suspended from a Cajun Thunder floats, on Hookup lures tipped with a three or four inch Gulp shrimp and on Rapala Twitchin Raps, Clackin Raps and X Raps. Just about every grass flat we have fished has produced goods numbers of sea trout. Lots of Barracudas are available and at times have proven to be a nuisance when casting live pilchards at schools of Snook that I have found in Biscayne Bay on recent trips. Schools of bluefish and Spanish mackerel have eaten our live pilchards as fast as we could get a bait in the water. Large Jack Crevalles up to 20 pounds have been chasing baitfish schools near the Ocean inlets and out in the ocean. Mangrove Snappers are finding the warmer water conditions more to their liking and we are catching them throughout the Bay. Gag Groupers have been eating our live baits and then breaking us off in the rocks but we have managed to land a few and then released them unharmed like the Snook we have been catching but now we can keep the legalized Groupers. We have had a few days when weather conditions have allowed us to get offshore and the fishing has been outstanding. April is known for large spawning Kingfish, the biggest Dolphins of the year, Blackfin Tunas, Cobia, large Spanish Mackerel, Bluefish and big spawning Amberjacks on the wrecks and some of that fishing has been available this past week but much of it is still to come. On recent trips we have had nice Mutton snappers that ate live pilchards on the bottom, Gag groupers, big jack Crevalles, Amberjacks and Almoco Jacks over 30 pounds, chased schools of small Blackfin Tunas and then hooked and lost a few on Rapala X Raps, large Spanish Mackerel, huge Barracudas, Kingfish, giant Bluerunners but no dolphins. Fishing in Flamingo has been as good as the weather. Catch a good weather day, especially if the weather has been nice for a few days and the fishing has been very good for Sea Trout, redfish, a few snook, some Cobia and Tarpon and of course lots of Ladyfish, Jacks and Mangrove Snappers. Check out the pictures I have added to this report to see some of the recent catches. Give me a call and let’s get out on the water while the fish are here and eating. Then you can see your face with a big smile in my photo album as you hold your special catch. YOUR UP NEXT! Just give me call and let's see what we can catch! http://www.getemsportfishing.com]GetEmSportFishing.com - Light Tackle Sport Fishing with Captain Alan Sherman shermana@bellsouth.net Check out my report in the Miami Herald's Sports section under Fishing Updates each Thursday, the Florida Sportsman Magazines South Florida Internet Fishing Report Welcome to floridaspotsman.com - Search Results for "floridaspotsman.com" Welcome to floridaspotsman.com - Search Results for "floridaspotsman.com"[/url]), my monthly Action Spotter Fishing Report for the South Region in the Florida Sportsman Magazine each month. I have recently been wearing a lot of Columbia Sports Wear on my fishing charters and the new Blood & Guts shirts are amazing. I have had mackerel, cobia and snook just splatter me with blood and one good washing and the shirts are as good as new. Check out their web site at Columbia Sportswear Company | Select Site Sponsors: Yamaha, Bob Hewes Boats, Maverick, Minn Kota, Lowrance Electronics, Daiwa, General Motors & Chevrolet, Rapala, Mustad, Ande Lines, Pure Fishing, Gulp, Berkley, Precision Tackle, Cajun Thunders, Capt. Hank Brown's Hook Up Lures, Hydro Glow Lights, Costa Del Mar Sunglasses, Saltwater Assassins, Key Largo Rods, Lee Fisher Cast Nets, Smartshield, Master Repair in Stuart Florida, Power Pole, Stow Master Nets, superfishlight.com, Columbia Wear, Tempress Seating Capt. Alan Sherman "Get Em" Sportfishing Charters 786-436-2064 w ww.getemsportfishing.com. Miami Fishing Forecast: I expect the fishing to be pretty consistent for the next three or four months with lots of SEA TROUT, JACK CREVALLES, LADYFISH, SPANISH MACKEREL, BLUEFISH, GROUPER, BARRACUDAS, SNOOK, TARPON and some POMPANO in NORTH BISCAYNE BAY and OFFSHORE of MIAMI KINGFISH, MACKEREL, SAILFISH and DOLPHINS available on the calmer days and in SOUTH BISCAYNE BAY lots of action from a wide variety of fish like the SNAPPERS, GROUPERS, JACKS, BLUEFISH, MACKERELS, POMPANO, LADYFISH, PORGIES, GRUNTS, SNOOK and BLUERUNNERS keeping anglers busy catching and releasing fish most of the day. FLAMINGO in EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK will have a huge amount of wildlife like the WHITE PELICANS, ROSEATTE SPOONBILLS, SKIMMER BIRDS,GULLS, OSPREYS, EAGLES, TERNS, EGRETS, HERONS, ALLIGATORS, CROCODILES, BOTTLE NOSED DOLPHINS, MANATTEES, SHARKS and TURTLES and of course the wide variety of fish that migrate into FLORIDA BAY and the GULF waters during the cooler months of the year. SNOOK, TARPON, REDFISH, SEA TROUT, SHEEPSHEAD, TRIIPLETAIL, BLACK DRUM, SNAPPER, GOLIATH AND GAG GROUPER, POMOPANO, COBIA, MACKEREL, BLUEFISH and I'm sure I am leaving a few other fish species out will be available to all anglers at one time or another through the Spring Fishing Season.
  14. Walk outside breath in the air and tell me this isn’t the beginning of April instead of the beginning of May! I know that’s what I was thinking! The fish too! Turn your clock back a month and that’s the best way to explain why the fishing is the way it is today. The weather patterns that we have had this year have pushed back the calendar a whole month and the fish are responding as if it was the beginning of April not May. That’s OK because if you haven’t had a chance to get out on the water recently then you still have time to take advantage of mild conditions and the Spring Migration. Fishing has been very good to say the least with the one exception being in Flamingo. I say that about Flamingo with a hesitation in my voice because all we need for Flamingo to take off is a few days of calm conditions and winds from the east. Recent strong winds from the northeast and east have been good for the Miami areas but not so much for Flamingo where water conditions have been very rough and dirty. Fishing out of Miami has been very good even if the weather at times has not. I have had an opportunity to fish with my family quite a bit and also filled in the free days with charters to fill the week. Air temperatures have risen and during the past weeks we have had winds from the south to east at 10 to as much as 25 miles per hour so we have had to get creative in finding waters that will give us enough protection to fish and still be comfortable. Thankfully I have been fishing the areas that I fish enough to know where those spots are. Fishing in North Biscayne Bay has produced great catches of Sea Trout to over four pounds on live pilchards suspended from a Cajun Thunder floats, on Hookup lures tipped with a three or four inch Gulp shrimp and on Rapala Twitchin Raps, Clackin Raps and X Raps. Just about every grass flat we have fished has produced goods numbers of sea trout. Lots of Barracudas are available and at times have proven to be a nuisance when casting live pilchards at schools of Snook that I have found in Biscayne Bay on recent trips. Schools of bluefish and Spanish mackerel have eaten our live pilchards as fast as we could get a bait in the water. Large Jack Crevalles up to 20 pounds have been chasing baitfish schools near the Ocean inlets and out in the ocean. Mangrove Snappers are finding the warmer water conditions more to their liking and we are catching them throughout the Bay. Gag Groupers have been eating our live baits and then breaking us off in the rocks but we have managed to land a few and then released them unharmed like the Snook we have been catching but now we can keep the legalized Groupers. We have had a few days when weather conditions have allowed us to get offshore and the fishing has been outstanding. April is known for large spawning Kingfish, the biggest Dolphins of the year, Blackfin Tunas, Cobia, large Spanish Mackerel, Bluefish and big spawning Amberjacks on the wrecks and some of that fishing has been available this past week but much of it is still to come. On recent trips we have had nice Mutton snappers that ate live pilchards on the bottom, Gag groupers, big jack Crevalles, Amberjacks and Almoco Jacks over 30 pounds, chased schools of small Blackfin Tunas and then hooked and lost a few on Rapala X Raps, large Spanish Mackerel, huge Barracudas, Kingfish, giant Bluerunners but no dolphins. Fishing in Flamingo has been as good as the weather. Catch a good weather day, especially if the weather has been nice for a few days and the fishing has been very good for Sea Trout, redfish, a few snook, some Cobia and Tarpon and of course lots of Ladyfish, Jacks and Mangrove Snappers. Check out the pictures I have added to this report to see some of the recent catches. Give me a call and let’s get out on the water while the fish are here and eating. Then you can see your face with a big smile in my photo album as you hold your special catch. YOUR UP NEXT! Just give me call and let's see what we can catch! Miami Fishing Forecast: I expect the fishing to be pretty consistent for the next three or four months with lots of SEA TROUT, JACK CREVALLES, LADYFISH, SPANISH MACKEREL, BLUEFISH, GROUPER, BARRACUDAS, SNOOK, TARPON and some POMPANO in NORTH BISCAYNE BAY and OFFSHORE of MIAMI KINGFISH, MACKEREL, SAILFISH and DOLPHINS available on the calmer days and in SOUTH BISCAYNE BAY lots of action from a wide variety of fish like the SNAPPERS, GROUPERS, JACKS, BLUEFISH, MACKERELS, POMPANO, LADYFISH, PORGIES, GRUNTS, SNOOK and BLUERUNNERS keeping anglers busy catching and releasing fish most of the day. FLAMINGO in EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK will have a huge amount of wildlife like the WHITE PELICANS, ROSEATTE SPOONBILLS, SKIMMER BIRDS,GULLS, OSPREYS, EAGLES, TERNS, EGRETS, HERONS, ALLIGATORS, CROCODILES, BOTTLE NOSED DOLPHINS, MANATTEES, SHARKS and TURTLES and of course the wide variety of fish that migrate into FLORIDA BAY and the GULF waters during the cooler months of the year. SNOOK, TARPON, REDFISH, SEA TROUT, SHEEPSHEAD, TRIIPLETAIL, BLACK DRUM, SNAPPER, GOLIATH AND GAG GROUPER, POMOPANO, COBIA, MACKEREL, BLUEFISH and I'm sure I am leaving a few other fish species out will be available to all anglers at one time or another through the Spring Fishing Season.
  15. Renewed my Surf Permit, and have a new rod being shipped to me this week. With that being said I decided to call off sick and spend the day (thursday) fishing. I think i read the High tide will be at 8:45am; my plan is to get there around 6am, and fish to atleast 12pm before packing it up and chasing croakers closer to home. My question is do you guys know when the stores with the BAIT open up.. I read that Old Inlet opens at 7am (too late), are there others ? Side Question: I was thinking about fishing 3r's, but have fished most of the other spots. Is there any other aera procuding better than 3r's? If you see me stop by and say HI.. 2006 Gray Dodge Durango..
  16. Folks the weather has really been changing a lot lately. With ups and downs in temps, winds and cloud cover. We have had some very nice days and we’ve had some very windy days as well. Over all, the fishing has been good and we are seeing different kinds of fish showing up as the water warms up. We are even starting to see a few Spanish mackerel around just off the beach. To the Fishing Report>>> On the nice days; light winds and sunny skies the ocean fishing has been good. We have been targeting lots of different fish like; Gray trout, Sea bass, Blues, and Flounder. Jigging has been the most productive for this kind of fishing. The best lures have been metal jigging spoons and grubs. One once jigging spoons and ½ oz grubs with Berkley Gulp as a tip on the jigging spoons. We have caught most of the fish on hard/live bottoms and artificial reefs just off the beach to six miles off the beach. There has been a hand full of very nice Sea bass, with a few over three plus pounds; that’s some great eating! We are seeing Bonita, Blues and a few Spanish when we are trolling off the beach from one to five miles. Trolling Clark spoons and small deep driver lures has been the key to success. When using the Clark spoons, I would recommend the pink flash spoon in sizes #00, #0 and #1; the pink flash series has really helped us put more fish in the boat. A bird rig on top with a Clark spoon about five to six feet behind it or a Blue water Candy Spanish daisy chain have worked very well on top too. Look for birds working or marking bait on you fish finder is the way to find the feeding fish. When the Bonita, Blues and Spanish are on top feeding; cast Maria and Sea striker jig-spoons. The colors that seem to work the best are pink, green and blue. We use a forty pound Fluorocarbon leader; about fifth teen to eight teen inches long. I really like Stren’s tinted (gunsmoke) floro leader material for clear water conditions; “this stuff really works”! A light weight 7’ rod loaded with ten to fifth teen pound braid is important for casting to these fast fish. The reason for this is the further you can cast equals more chance’s you will hook up. When there are a lot of boats chasing the Bonita, they get wearer of boats. If you can cast far; you will catch more of these fish! Redfish are really starting to fire off; we are starting to see a few bigger fish in the area from Topsail down to the Cape Fear River. When we are casting lures; grubs are doing the trick. Berkley Gulp and Powerbait in colors molting and new penny; fishing them around docks, oyster rocks and grass lines are catching drum well. Bait fishing is still good and will continue right through the summer. Red and Black drum are hitting cut shrimp and mullet on Carolina rigs around the same area; dock oyster rocks etc… You never know how big or little the drum will be when you are bait fishing; we’ve had reds as small as fourteen inches and as big as over thirty inches. Fishing Gear we use: Reels Penn Conquer and Sargus spinning in sizes 2000 and 4000. Spiderwire Ultra-cast braid in 10 and 15#. Rods: Ugly stick lites 6’6” and 7’ Med & Med-Heavy and the All Star ASR spinning rod ASR844S and ASR845S. In Other Fishing News: June 5-6, 2010 “In the Water Fishing School” I, Capt. Rick Bennett and four other of the best local guides are putting on this school on. This school will be real-time hands on fishing experience! There will be one day of hands on classroom instruction and the next day on the water, real-time fishing experience. The school is limited to the first 24 participants! If you want to learn from the best local guides and see how we do it, take the time to check it out; Fishing School - Rod-Man In The Water Fishing School *We only have a few spots left for this School!!! I’m really looking forward to being part of this school! Thanks for reading this report, if you would like to go fishing drop me a line. Book now for this coming summer fishing season and don’t forget to take a kid fishing! Good Luck, Captain Jot Owens 910-233-4139
  17. The Hickory Shad are are running real good on the Susky. The other day I went just below the dam, caught 6 real nice Whites, 2lbs and up, numerous Hickorys, a nice Smallmouth, and even a Walleye. Thats the first Walleye I ever caught or even saw in that area. The Dam was really letting the water rip through the gates. The Gizzard Shad were as thick as could be. I wonder if anyone ever uses them for Surf Fishing bait?? You can get the Shad anywhere along the Susky. A couple real good spots are right below the dam, the mouth of Deer Creek, and also up the creek. You need Non-Tidal license above the mouth of Deer Creek. Anyone that is not use to fishing the Susquehannah; the water flow from the dam at Conowingo plays a large role on your productivity. There is a Phone Number you can call to find out how the water flow will be be for that day. Good Fishing, Hulk P.S.- WHERE ARE THE HERRING?????????????
  18. By Dr. Julie Ball IGFA Representative, Virginia Beach www.drjball.com 09 April 2010 With air temperatures peaking near ninety degrees lately, the water temperatures are quickly rising, with the spring fishing heating up accordingly. The best news is the spring flounder run is showing promise in the lower Bay. Anglers are finding good numbers of keeper fish in the usual flatfish hot spots. The best hauls are still coming from the curve near the third island of the CBBT. Catches are also improving along the Baltimore Channel, buoy 36A, and Back River Reef. Rudee Inlet is also giving up a few keepers this week. On the Eastern Shore, the seaside inlets near Oyster and Wachapreague are producing fish up to 4-pounds. Most drifters are experiencing their best luck with bare hooks donned with strip bait, but minnows paired with squid will also work. Tautog action is still going strong, especially within Bay waters. Tog anglers are scoring using fiddler crabs and clams on lower Bay structures and wrecks. The rocks and tubes of the artificial islands and the pilings near the High Rise section of the Bridge Tunnel are providing the best results. The Concrete Ships, Cape Henry wreck, Big D wreck, and the Yancy wreck are also providing some good action. Most folks are catching limits of fish ranging to around 4-pounds, but several 10-pounders are also in the mix. Deeper water wrecks are also producing nice togs, with fish to 15-pounds taking offered crab in water ranging to around 70 to 100-feet. Anglers are happening upon a surprise catch while tog fishing lately. Atlantic cod, a species indigenous mostly to the colder waters off New England and Nova Scotia, are making an unprecedented showing in local waters recently. Although cod are occasionally in Virginia and North Carolina waters during the winter months, this tasty Newfoundland staple is a pleasant surprise for local wreck anglers, who are now catching scores of cod up to around 9-pounds. These fish have a delicate, white flakey flesh, and are historically used for the well-known New England “Fish and Chips.” The cod are hitting mostly crab and clam intended for tautog. Some speckled trout continue to hit in the Elizabeth River, but the fish are moving out of the Cove and Hot Ditch areas. Anglers targeting specks from Bainbridge Boulevard, to the I-64 High Rise Bridge are finding some takers. Trolled lures are attracting the most strikes, with Mirrolures a top choice. Puppy drum continue to provide some action in the lower Bay shallows and inlets. Most any fresh bait or lure can provide excellent action. Croaker are providing some pullage in Near the CBBT, off Willoughby, Ocean View, and the near Little Creek Jetties. The bigger hardheads are still coming from the lower Bay Rivers. The deep water off the Virginia coast is still the place to be if you are in the mood to crank up tilefish, black bellied rosefish and grouper from over 300 feet of water. Be aware that plenty of pesky dog fish are also ready to compete for your bait right now. Offshore anglers are still enjoying the bluefin tuna bite off Carolina. Many bluefins are taking jigs, which is a blast when hooked up to a tuna topping a hundred pounds, or more. Scattered yellowfin tuna are also providing some variety. For more information, go to www.drjball.com.
  19. One of the great parts of being a professional Captain is the people you meet. One of my favorite charters has to be father & son teams. Wednesday it was a pleasure to welcome back Barry and his son Nolan for another day on the water. Last year Nolan caught just about every species of fish in Tampa Bay! If I recall correctly I believe he took 8 or 10 different species of fish. After Sundays rain and cold front things had settled down I was optimistic for a quality outing. First stop was the top secret Black drum location. So much for secrets by 845 there was 20 boats chasing drum. Our first cast was immediately slammed by a large drum. Sadly the fish quickly broke free. We used the trolling motor to quietly ease up on the school and once again hooked up. It was game on with over 50 pounds of Black drum on one end and 90 pound Nolan on the other end. Nolan was amazing to say the least, using a medium action rods he worked the Drum to the boat 3 or 4 times over 20 minutes. Finally Dad jumped in and had the Drum boat side in another 10 minutes. We took pictures and jumped back into the action. By now boats were chasing the school. it’s imperative to wait and be patient and not pressure the school. They drum headed to deeper water and not seen again the next few hours. Trust me be patient and keep the school happy and you will get your shot at a true inshore giant. We rounded out the balance of the day catching Trout, Ladyfish, Catfish and Pinfish. The water had cooled from Sundays storm and was very murky is spots. The 7 day forecast is outstanding with warm, sunny days. Look for waters temperatures jump from 66 to 70 quickly. Captain Steven Markovich Florida Fishing Charters | On The Mark Fishing Charters | Tampa Bay | Clearwater | Boca Grande
  20. By Dr. Julie Ball IGFA Representative, Virginia Beach Dr. Julie Ball's Website IGFA - International Game Fish Association 26 March 2010 Spring fever is in the air, and anglers are anxious to jump at any chance to wet a hook. With the recent warm weather, hundreds of boats hit the water looking for some saltwater fishing action. The winner was tautog. The inshore tautog bite is on fire. Plenty of keeper tog averaging to around 6-pounds are coming from the Bridge Tunnel, with a few fish even pushing to over 10-pounds. Blue crabs and fiddler crabs are the top inshore bait. Deeper wrecks are giving up the bigger fish. Captain Neal Taylor of Virginia Beach and his crew aboard the Seaduction had a great tog outing this week. The crew landed eight citation fish while fishing at the Triangle Wrecks. Neal took the lead in the state for the year with a 16-pound, 1-ounce bruiser. A clam and crab “sandwich” was the bait combination of choice. Striped bass along the coast become officially off limits after this weekend, but most anglers will hardly notice. Most are focusing on intercepting the newly arriving spring species. Although the action is still slow, anglers are making their way to their standby flounder holes. Scattered catches of flatfish up to 23-inches are coming from several areas around the lower Bay, with the best catches on the outgoing tide near the 8-mile marker along the Bridge Tunnel. The appealing bait is drifted squid or strip bait. A few keepers are also coming from around the 3rd and 4th islands. On the Eastern Shore, flounder are showing promise in the usual hot spots in Quincy, Wachapreague, and Oyster. Puppy drum are still providing action within Rudee Inlet and the Elizabeth River. These young redfish are aggressive feeders and offer a great fight on light tackle. According to the folks at Ocean’s East 2, the word is that the speckled trout action is sketchy this week. A few nice specks are still taking lures in some areas within the Elizabeth River. Mirrolures are enticing the most strikes. Todd at Bayside Bait and Tackle reports that croaker are showing up in local commercial nets. It is only a matter of time until anglers begin catching them on hook and line. With a few more warm days, the croaker action should take off. Pier anglers are manning the rails at the Little Island and Ocean View fishing piers hoping to intercept the hardheads when they become hungry. For a change of pace, several anglers are targeting shad within the nearby rivers and tributaries. These fish are a blast on light line, but be sure to check your regulations before you go. A few boats were able to make the long trip to deep dropping territory off the Virginia coast last week. With the dog fish still out in force, blueline tilefish catches are a challenge. The Rudee Angler and the Rudee Whaler out of the Fishing Center in Rudee Inlet took their boats to the edge of the Canyon last week where they loaded up with quality fish, with some bluelines weighing to 19-pounds. The crew also enjoyed a good catch of big black bellied rosefish from the deeper water. The offshore action off Carolina is heating up, with reports of yellowfin tuna, bluefin tuna, and wahoo keeping trollers happy. For more information, go to Dr. Julie Ball's Website. Upload your pictures to our gallery.
  21. Redfish are starting to show up with better consistency than anytime Captain Steven has seen the last 3 months. While temperatures are still on the below normal side 70 degree days have slowly raised the water temperatures out of the 50’s and into the 60’s. The increase has enticed reds to push up onto local flats. Finding schools has been easier getting the redfish to chew is another story. Captain Little Jim of Hook Setting charters reported finding a school of large redfish but none would chew. Captain Jim did manage 4 redfish 18-20” on a smaller school on shrimp. Captain Justin of Hot Spots charters also has found schooling reds on Tampa Bay’s south shore with a similar theme slow to chew. Look for these fish to turn on quickly with a 10 day forecast featuring mid 70 temperatures and longer days. This week I managed several reds 18-22” all taken on Gulp shrimp and cut ladyfish. Along with the redfish and trout Captain Steven has scored on large 30-45 pound Black Drum. These monsters are schooling in 3’ of water in lower Tampa Bay. Once located its game on! Gulp shrimp 3 or 4” on Mission jig heads work great. Be sure and use a quality jig head on these bruisers, poor quality jigs hooks will straighten under the pressure of 40 pounds. I took a quick look for bait at the North Skyway Bridge and did mark some baitfish on my depth finder. No large shows but a positive sign. Look for the water to quickly rise to 65-66 and watch the action turn on. The redfish bite will turn on and snook will start to feed after a long hard winter. Captain Steven
  22. Fish Report 3/12/10 CG Inspection Stuff Culled Out.. Truth in Fisheries Hi All, Get my life-raft back I'm going fishing. Have scheduled a CG safety inspection for early April. The most important thing happens at the end of every day: People walk off the boat. Getting ready for and having CG inspections is about never swimming off the boat... We've done some maintenance, will do some more between fishing trips. Have to get that life raft back though before we fish. By then the water should be ready for another try at tautog. An article has absolutely blown up on the web--Culled Out. It fit a model that some would like to see moved forward and was even picked up by a major news outfit--Fox. ESPN has apologized http://sports.espn.go.com/outdoors/saltwater/columns/story?columnist=bowman_steve&id=4982359 Snopes has blasted it http://www.snopes.com/politics/obama/fishingban.asp A student of propaganda could make a study of it.. It just so happens that I was at a meeting today (3/12/10) of the Coastal and Watershed Resources Committee where the ongoing activities of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean --yes, MARCO-- and Marine Spatial Planning, MSP were discussed. Our region's contribution to Ocean Policy --MARCO-- was the last Regional Council to form under Bush 43's guidance. MSP is its crucial tool; cutting edge charting, zoning, a way to permit big-energy so they can get busy with wind & oil. I absolutely promise; This my deepest, fullest guarantee: Had I not been at this meeting that discussed MSP & Ocean Policy the word 'Fish' would not have been uttered. Energy people & policy wonks are not concerned with fishing. At all. Unless they are forced to be because there is an overlap. There is. MARCO & MSP---our Ocean Policy--is about Energy - Big Energy. I am active in voicing comment because I think Big Energy isn't going to give the south end of a north-bound rat if we "Used to fish there".. I'm there to protect our region's fishing grounds--All of 'em. It so happens too that coral reefs remain un-found off our coast.. Right where they want some windmills. I want wind-power too--Big Time. Carefully. And I want Big-Energy's help.. This week, and many others, big-water trawlers towed across corals that no human has laid eyes on and caught the heck out of fish in 50 - 60 fathoms. I'd wager their dead-discards would keep us fishing this season.. We remain ignorant of habitat crucial to our region's fisheries. I think big-energy will be the impetus, the driver, for its discovery. We fishers ought to make sure. Sakes knows the flame that Jacques Cousteau ignited, that spirit of discovery that sent a generation of explorers to sea, has seemingly died--or been buried in bureaucracy.. Corals that no human has seen - Really. The flounder you might catch in a back-creek in coastal Virginia or on the edge of the shoal behind OC's convention center will spend the winter in the deep--near the canyons. The squid that fed a white marlin until it ate a ballyhoo.. It all ties together. I wrote the piece below as on Op-Ed. Will make as much noise as possible when my raft is back. Goin' Fishin. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 http://www.morningstarfishing.com/ "Obama administration will accept no more public input for federal fishery strategy" shouts the headline. "No More Input" decries the article titled "Culled Out." The Interagency Policy Task-Force --every guvmint agency with ocean ties & all the regional councils like MARCO-- filed a framework report that included the Marine Spatial Planning that's been chugging along for a good while. A framework report cause for alarm? Odd, I never saw a 60 day comment period closing as such big news. True though; No more input. At least until the next phase. Been better to shout it out when the comment period was open; Get people to examine it. There was a window to comment months ago on the interim report too; many public meetings. Marine Spatial Planning, MSP.. so much controversy. "Entire Watersheds Could Be Shut Down" this article cries. MSP is not about creating fish quotas. For many fishers that's all management is, the next quota review: It's what fishermen pay attention to. Our Ocean Policy and Marine Spatial Planning is about Windmills and Drill Baby Drill. It's a way minimize conflict and, if we pay attention, MSP can ensure that culturally important fishing grounds and fish habitat aren't needlessly lost as we press on with new energy for our nation. Ever heard of the nearshore corals off Maryland? I wish you had: YouTube Common Seafloor Habitat Mid-Atlantic. Ocean Policy, including Marine Spatial Planning, isn't about taking away fishing areas; It's about preserving them as the US moves into a new era of energy development. These government task forces are charged with Promoting Energy. Sustainably if possible. Any other tasks are a distant second: I seriously doubt stealing our fishing spots is one of them. They could run us over by accident though. Have to let them know we're here. I made comments on the draft policy and final framework; received feedback too. The next policy phase will seek more charting input from fishers. I know it will in our region. But that will be after the sport-fish conference call on March 15th with NMFS's new head, Eric Schwaab: And after the rec-fish summit in mid-April in Silver Spring. These are giant communications steps. Never been done before to my knowledge. Critical time too. As a party boat operator in Ocean City, MD. with 30 years experience, I am fighting for my business' very existence because of recreational catch-estimate data rotten enough to make a menhaden processing plant blush. As fishery rebuilding plans have advanced--often with great success--the effects of less than perfect marine science and data's complex illusions are creating havoc as we close in on some species' restoration. For instance: In September & October 2007 shore fishers targeting flounder in Maryland are officially estimated to have caught what MD party & charter boats will catch in 15 years. We are often falsely accused of going over-quota; Have repeatedly fought the data and lost: Lost because we could not prove guys fishing on the bank weren't catching like an Alaskan factory trawler: Lost because 36,017 flounder from shore in two months seemed to regulators a reasonable number even if Maryland's professional crews caught well under 3,000 that year: Lost because although the data is astonishingly poor, as the 'best science available' it is inarguable--It must be used. We suffer shortened seasons, emergency closures, size limit increases and creel limit reductions because of statistical analysis that, literally, couldn't survive the light of day. This bad data is building, cumulative: Getting worse. Marine Spatial Planning is not the problem nor will it be. Fishermen would be foolish to allow big-energy in without some manner of safety-net. America does need to move forward with energy policy. Fishers need to look ahead as well. Oil wells and windmills will actually contribute to marine production, will create reef communities. However, as the Chesapeake's fishers learned with the closing of the gas-docks by Homeland Security, sometimes what's good for fish doesn't remain good for fishermen. I'm proud to tell you Maryland's coastal anglers did not wait for the government; That we had self imposed regulations on many species long before management--sometimes 1/2 a decade before regulation; That we have privately funded much of our reef restoration/creation: That we are staunch conservationists.. whose businesses are being destroyed by bad catch data, poor stock assessments: A general lack of flexibility. Even the skippers fishing after WWII never had ocean flounder fishing as we now do. Still 'rebuilding' the summer flounder population though. There's been no discovery of those corals I mentioned earlier; especially the areas long-lost. Regulators fail to realize the positive effect of artificial reef construction on black sea bass & tautog populations: Haven't calculated the negative effects of losing enormous swaths of once productive reef-like seafloor either. Recognize numbers on paper though.. Use it too, no matter how rotten. The challenges of rebuilding, fishing on rebuilt stocks, and finding those species left behind are not insurmountable. Bureaucratic rigidity is making it mighty hard though.. All those fishermen, commercial & recreational, that recently rallied in DC were there for the Flexibility in Rebuilding American Fisheries Act. Fishers need managers that can manage as we navigate; Follow a compass course yes, but dodge a new sand-bar.. Held rigidly to data sets of ill-found science --this math that would have made Madoff's staff envious-- our regulators are running us hard-aground. There's no Flexibility in the Great Recession.. That is destroying the fishers. What fishermen need now is truth & wisdom: Truth in stock assessments, Truth in catch estimates, Truth in news reporting and Wisdom in our governance. Strikes me we could use some of that near-everywhere. Capt. Monty Hawkins Berlin, MD.
  23. Here is a follow-up article from Chris Gately of ESPN Saltwater Outdoors online that came out yesterday. You are welcome to send Chris an email and let him know what you think. [/url]http://sports.espn.go.com/outdoors/saltwater/columns/story?columnist=gatley_chris&id=4940977 Updated: February 24, 2010, 12:58 PM ET Jet ski fishing in gear Anglers using personal watercraft report in By Chris Gatley ESPNOutdoors.com Archive Seems Jet Ski fishing has some people fired up. Within hours of publishing an article on jet ski fishing, photos and comments came to my email inbox. Chris GatleyJohn Kostovick of Philadelphia says his rig has taken him 10 miles out and into 2 feet of water. Billy Crew’s of Louisiana was ecstatic to see an article covering his preferred style of fishing. John Kostovick of Philadelphia recently purchased a jet ski for his own saltwater fishing needs along the New Jersey coast and beyond. Kostovick has grown to love his jet ski and the capabilities it offers as a fishing platform. Others wrote asking about rigging their platform and what rigs are best served for fishing. I would like to share some of these comments just in case you decide to look at jet ski fishing as an option. “My professional job yields minimal time and most of my fishing is done at a moment’s notice and always alone,” Kostovick wrote. “Plus, I have the desire to fish the entire coast rather than being stuck to one marina. Therefore, owning a 20-23 foot center console is just too much to trailer, to put in the water alone, and takes too long to get to the fishing spots. “Last year, I went in pursuit of finding an alternative. The guy you wrote about, Jet Ski Brian, inspired me to research and move forward with fishing from a jet ski.” Kostovick’s comments were not alone. Scott Weiss from Florida summed up the same sentiments when he wrote “Fishing from my jet ski offers me more freedom than my 20′ boat.” Kostovick purchased a used 2004 Yamaha FX, the largest, three-seat model made by Yamaha. He was looking at size, stability and engine reliability. His choice of jet ski is easy to trailer, easy to launch at boat ramps and is very fuel efficient while offering low maintenance and cleaning costs. Like most of these anglers, Kostovick installed a marine battery powering a Hummingbird 788 colored GPS/fish finder and a built-in VHF radio. Like Jet Ski Brian’s rig, a 120-quart marine cooler with rod holders and cutting board offers quick and easy access. “I have been out in 4-6 foot seas and with the exception of getting a little wet, I have had no stability concerns,” Kostovick added. “I have had the Jet Ski 10 miles off shore and also fished in 2 feet of water on the flats.” Crews, from Southern Louisiana, was the first to respond: Ccourtesy Billy Crews Billy Crews has been using a jet ski to fish in estuarial marsh areas of Southern Louisiana. “I fish mainly in the Atchafalaya Spillway and estuarial marsh areas in South Louisiana (south of Baton Rouge and New Orleans). This area has made quite a recovery since Katrina and the fishing is outstanding. We catch plenty of bass, redfish and speckled trout. My ski gets me to the fish.” Crews fishes from his super-charged 2006 Sea Doo RXT SC equipped with 215 ponies. His chosen platform is approximately 11 feet in length with a beam of 4 feet. That combination offers a super stable platform while the horsepower offers speed and reliability. “Consequently, Jet Ski Brian prepares more for the unexpected, while my dangerous encounters seem to be that of the alligators,” Crews says. No matter how much correspondence I receive, two common denominators hold true. Safety is of the utmost importance. The second is that these guys love fishing off these platforms. It is safe, fun and takes them to the fish. Surprisingly enough, all of the guys I spoke with are fully outfitting these platforms with top of the line equipment and all of the accessories any larger boat owner would carry. With total investment costs ranging from $7-15K, expect to see more of these machines on a waterway near you. Editor’s note: Capt. Chris Gatley can be found with his fishing clients chasing striped bass in front of the Statue of Liberty, or heading offshore to the Atlantic Ocean canyons off the NJ/NY coast for tuna. His articles on cutting-edge fishing techniques can be found in The Fisherman Magazine, and he’s a regular presenter at key sports shows during the winter months (when he’s not pursuing whatever he can find in East Coast rivers).
  24. There is still much speculation going around about the effects of the big freeze we experienced at the beginning of the year. While the full extent of the damage may not be known for quite some time, I can say with confidence that the populations of adult redfish and black drum are alive and well. We have been seeing hundreds of fish each trip roaming the shallow flats. From big schools of redfish and drum to singles and small groups, the fish have been active, feeding, and generally happy. The weather has been the biggest foe with temperatures on many days 15-20 degrees below average. Water temperatures during the past week have been staying around 50 and the fish do not seem to mind at all. On a trip last week, Canadians Emile and Serge joined me on a blustery day. The wind were topping 20 and the flats were dirty. With only one other boat in sight the entire day we had the water to ourselves. Both guys caught several nice redfish including an 11 and 22 pounder. This past Sunday, I went out on a windy 33 degree morning with my Friend Capt. Drew. We started spotting tailing redfish almost immediately and they were willing to eat a three inch DOA CAL in Arkansas Glow. We visited four spots and found three of them full of redfish catching multiple fish along the way. Monday brought some of the nicest weather we have had in quite some time. Sunny skies and light winds made for some excellent sight fishing. Wilson and Tyler had spent the previous day at the Daytona 500 and wanted to experience the Mosquito Lagoon before returning to Pennsylvania. As soon as we started fishing, we found ourselves surrounded by schools of fish. Tyler hooked up with a redfish on his first cast. Wilson landed his first red a while later. They had steady shots at redfish throughout the day including some schools of 20-30 pound fish. Yesterday, 16 year old Cameron joined me on his first trip to Mosquito Lagoon. An experienced offshore angler, he wanted to try some inshore sight fishing. The skies were clear but the wind blew hard the whole day. Despite having to battle the wind, Cam made some great casts to tailing fish and landed four redfish from 27-41 inches. Water levels in Mosquito Lagoon remain much higher than normal for this time of year. Most of the redfish we have been finding have been in 12-18 inches of water with plenty of grass. High winds have made casting light baits difficult but a 3 inch CAL tail on a 1/4 ounce jig works well. The key when using a setup like this with an exposed hook is to not let the bait settle down in the grass until it is near the fish. On days with lighter winds, the DOA shrimp will be hard to beat. Capt. Chris Myers Orlando Fishing Guide
  25. Thursday morning, 2/4, I fished Estero Bay with John Hornell and his dad, Bud. We caught a 19-inch sheepshead, four keeper whitings and we released lots of ladyfish, small snapper and sheepshead. We used live shrimp for all. Friday was rainy and windy, but the skies cleared Saturday, as the next front moved through, leaving a high pressure system in effect. Unfortunately, winds continued to be strong and offshore plans had to be traded for a morning of bay fishing. Brian Distefano and friends, Ron, Jim and Jim’s son, Nick, fished Estero Bay with me, using live shrimp. By mid-morning, the winds were roaring so we stayed as sheltered as possible and managed to catch five keeper sheepshead, all about 15 inches. We released lots of smaller ones. The next time I got out on the water was Thursday morning, and that was in the backwaters on a catch-and-release trip with Mike Daley and son, Chris. It was chilly early on but warmed up nicely, and we delayed our start a bit to allow the sun to warm the air temperature. We used live shrimp to catch lots of sheepshead, the largest being 17 inches and 20 inches. We also released an 18-inch trout and some ladyfish. Friday’s five-to-seven foot seas prohibited my offshore trip from going out. We might have fished the bay, but with cold winds and a 90% chance of rain, the group decided to bag the trip entirely. Saturday morning, four brave anglers headed into Estero Bay with in early morning temperatures of right around fifty degrees, with a cold, NW wind gusting 25-30 knots. Shannon and Rob Staples and their friends, Lisa and Bob O’Keefe fished in the most wind-sheltered spots I could find for them. Using live shrimp, the group caught five keeper sheepshead to 18 inches and released lots of smaller ones. Bob & Lisa also landed two nice trout at 19 inches and 17 inches. Monday morning, 2/15, I had to look out the window and check the NOAA forecast twice to believe what I was seeing and hearing...CALM seas! You can see that report, along with my other offshore trips in the offshore reports posting.