Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'looking'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Announcements
  • Fishing Reports
    • New England Region
    • Mid-Atlantic Region
    • Southern Atlantic Region
  • Topics of Discussion
    • The Sand Bar
    • General Fishing Talk
    • Fishing Articles
    • Fishing Tackle and Gear
    • Do it Yourself Talk
    • Cookin' them up! Fishing recipes here!
    • Fish Species Information
    • Kayak Fishing
    • Fly Fishing

Found 731 results

  1. As usual, I read through the many fishing reports and see the amazing pictures of anglers proudly posing with their catch. By the time I have finished looking at the photos for the fourth time, the “fishy” part of my brain is creating a new list of excuses that may convince my wife to let me go fishing. Once I have finished explaining how the tide will be perfect for the next few hours, the weather forecast could not get any better and the tackle shop just received fresh bait, she usually gives her approval. In a rush to get out the door before she changes her mind, I find myself quickly going through my mental list of surf fishing necessities. Before I know it, I am on the sand wishing I had spent a little more time on that mental list. Depending on where you fish, having to run back to your house or the nearest tackle shop may not be a big deal, however if you fish areas like the southern end of Assateague Island, having to admit to your fishing buddy how you managed to forget the bait knife is not a good feeling. Some anglers like to step out for an hour or two and they don’t need to take much with them. On the other hand, if you are like me and can’t help but fish until it hurts, there are many items you can bring that will ease the pain. First of all, make sure you know the license requirements, regulations and creel limits for the beach you will be fishing. It is also a good idea to keep a fish species reference guide with you to help identify your catch. If you are not sure what you have caught, safely remove the hook and get it back into the water as fast as possible. A good photo will last much longer than any fish you will catch, so don’t hesitate to snap a quick picture. You will need something to help carry your gear through the soft sand. A surf fishing cart can be a great investment for fishing spots such as the North end of Assateague Island. On some beaches, such as the federal side of Assateague Island, you are allowed to drive your vehicle on the beach. This is very convenient for longer fishing trips that require more fishing gear. Of course you will need your surf fishing rod and reel, sinkers, hooks, and other basic fishing tackle. Choosing the type of tackle needed always depends on the species of fish you will be targeting. There are numerous options when it comes to choosing your tackle, however don’t let it overwhelm you. Your best bet will be checking out the fishing reports on the Internet and spending some time talking to the folks at our local tackle shops. They will be able to help you get an idea which rigs are best for your tackle box. You are going to need a cooler with ice to keep your bait fresh. It does not take long for the sun and warm air to dry out even the freshest bait. In the spring, the most commonly used baits, such as bunker or peeler crabs are going to need to be cut into pieces, so having a strong, serrated knife and cutting board are essential. The springtime sun can feel very warm at home; however the ocean breeze can feel surprisingly cold! Make sure you dress appropriately and have a good idea of the weather forecast. Even on those cloudy days, you will get sunburned so don’t forget sunscreen. Having a hat and a pair of polarized sunglasses will not only help with the sun’s glare on the water, it will also keep you from getting the painful “squint eye” headache. Wearing a comfortable pair of waterproof waders will certainly help keep your legs warm and dry when that unexpected wave sneaks up on you right in the middle of your cast. After you have heaved your bait into the surf, you are going to need a sturdy sand spike to hold your rod. When choosing your sand spike, make sure the bottom of your rod easily fits into the sand spike. In my opinion, the longer the sand spike, the better. You will need to shove it down into the sand far enough to be able to put pressure against it without it falling over. As the tide comes in and the sand becomes soft, make sure you frequently check your sand spike to ensure it does not move easily. One of the most common critters you are likely to catch is the Clearnose skate. Trust me, having a quality pair of needle nose pliers and fishing gloves will come in very handy when removing the hook from these spine covered bottom dwellers, as well as many other fish. Being able to sit down and rest while you wait for that record fish to swim by will make your trip much more enjoyable. Although your cooler can also serve as a seat, I recommend a lightweight beach chair with a cup holder. It’s always a good idea to bring something to eat and plenty of fresh water for drinking and washing your hands. Most importantly, you must remember you will be in constant contact with things that can hurt you if you fail to respect them. Think about it, you are dealing with sharp hooks and lead weights that are being hurled at incredible speeds. Be aware of the power of the ocean and the heat of the sun. There is always the possibility that you will have to unhook many different types of critters and just about all of them have some sort of natural defense. Excitement and adrenaline can take over very quickly when surf fishing and you have to remember to stay focused. Always have a first-aid kit and cell phone, especially if you are fishing alone. Although it may not be on your list of surf fishing gear, being safe is without a doubt the last thing you want to forget. Whenever possible, bring a friend with you. Not only can they help you untangle that spiny dogfish from your line, but in my opinion, sharing a good day on the beach with a buddy is a reward in itself.
  2. Ok with all the talk this year of getting a big shark and with all the new to shark fishing anglers I felt that a thread of general shark fishing tactics and responsibilities should be posted. In my opinion if you want to catch a shark but have never done it ask us here on atlantic anglers for someone to join you to "show the ropes". Better to have experience with you the first time you hook up to that big one with your adrenaline pumping and nerves shot. The other thing is to know where to set up and keep your targeted game on the hush side of things. Im not saying to hide the fact that your sharkin just dont tell everyone you run into on what your going after. We don't need any more attention to what we are fishin for than what is already being made. Case in point, a fellow shark angler has had great success sharkin up north this year and has posted pictures all over the place. Because of this, this northern state will now be putting in regulations on yaking out baits for quote unquote "big game". Shark fishing is not illegal,but it is walking a fine line. A lot of the sharks being caught are on the near threatened or threatened species list. If the wrong person catches a shark being mishandled things can get ugly real quick. Now back to location, I emphasized this because I don't think it would be a wise idea to go down to lets say ocean city and set up shop next to dozens of swimmers looking to catch a toothy critter. I know they are their anyway but to city officials you attracted them to that spot, also using bait attracts them their not because the shark just happens to be their. I am not trying to complain just want for everyone to be able to enjoy catching these beautiful species for many more years, and want to ensure everyone fishing for them uses good common sense so no one gets hurt including the shark. give some feedback and lets see what everyone else has to say.
  3. caught this peculiar looking creature at the CHSP pier about a week ago...it was 5-6 inches long...any idea what its called???
  4. Kmw and I hit plo ..looking for something different...the action was really slow Blues spots and croakers were caught will try again @ end of Aug Hight light was checking out a small pod of Dolphins working the water off the point The cooler shot is a another anglers catch
  5. I have been working on my new ride and on this post for a while. I am excited and looking forward to finishing. Here is the link Jet Ski Brian
  6. I have had a very busy summer of inshore saltwater fishing trips here on the Mosquito Lagoon flats and in the Backcountry at Edgewater and New Smyrna Beach, Florida. On the grass flats the Redfishing has been very steady with the summer pattern of fishing the mullet schools early and sight casting the sand holes later in the morning. Also some nice size Seatrout coming aboard. Backcountry trips have had steady action with some keeper Seatrout, Black Drum, and Mangrove Snapper. The Jack Crevalle and Ladyfish are always there to provide exciting strikes and fish fights from these fun catch and release game fish. We even had a few exciting moments from Tarpon strikes and jumps which were a little to much for our light Trout tackle to handle for long. Here are a couple of pictures from recent trips. My nephew Christopher Frost with his first ever Redfish and client Mike with a nice Black Drum caught on one of my Backcountry mixed bag trips. Come fish with me on beautiful Mosquito Lagoon for flats fishing, we will target Redfish and Seatrout.This type of sight fishing can be challenging and very rewarding when you hook up with a drag pulling Redfish or Trout. Good for experienced anglers or the less experienced anglers looking for a new fishing challenge. Or you could try one of my Indian River Backcountry Fishing trips, that is mixed bag fishing for Seatrout, Redfish, Black Drum, Jack Crevalle, Ladyfish, Bluefish, Snapper, & many more saltwater fish. On the average Backcountry trip we catch between 10 and 15 (or more) different species of saltwater fish.You never know what will bite with this type of fishing, mainly drift fishing while free lining live shrimp on light tackle make for lots of rod bending and drag pulling. Fun for experienced anglers and an easy way for less experienced anglers to be successful at catching lots of fish. MY BOAT COMFORTABLY ACCOMMODATES 1 TO 4 ANGLERS Located close to DAYTONA BEACH, NEW SMYRNA BEACH and ORLANDO, FLORIDA. Feel free to contact me at any time with questions you may have about my fishing charters. CHILDREN ALWAYS WELCOME – FAIR PRICES Capt. Michael Savedow Edgewater River Guide, Inc. 386-689-3781 email> EdgewaterRiverGuide@cfl.rr.com website> Daytona Beach,Orlando,New Smyrna,Mosquito Lagoon,Redfish,Fishing Guide, Charter Fishing
  7. A few things to consider before shark fishing By Mark Sampson OCEAN CITY -- I applaud those who pursue sharks from the beach. I'm sorry that I don't have the time during the summer months to do so myself. But the more photos I see of sharks taken from the beach, the more concerned I get about the well-being of the sharks that are caught and released. Sandbars, duskies and sand tigers are the larger sharks most likely to be landed by local surf anglers, since they are also three species of sharks that may not legally be retained at any time by recreational anglers, in most cases when a large shark is taken from a Delmarva beach it must be released. As the sport grows, too many anglers are jumping into it without the knowledge or skills needed to ethically deal with such large animals. Anglers who choose to mess with 100- to 200-pound sharks have better have their act together or the results might not fare well for fish or fisherman. Obviously there are safety issues for those handling the sharks, and one bad move could result in serious injuries. These ain't stripers, boys! For now I'll just suggest that fishermen keep their limbs out of the pointy end of their catch. I see too many photos of gut-hooked sharks and sharks that have been dragged too far from the water's edge. Anglers must keep in mind that just because they see a shark swim away after release, that it doesn't mean it's OK. Sharks can be so stressed out or damaged by improper handling. That's not a good outcome for the three species so often caught in the surf that are on the Prohibited Species List because their populations are so low. Do not pull sharks up onto the dry sand for photos or any other reason. Dragging a large shark by its tail can cause injuries to its vertebrae and other internal parts. During the day, the temperature away from the wet zone of the beach is going to be a lot warmer, and warm, dry air does a shark's skin no good. Before a shark is even hooked anglers should have a plan ready for a quick release. Cameras, tags, measuring devices and any other tools should be ready and available so there's no fumbling around at the last minute. Anglers should also forget about calling in friends or family to "come down to the beach and see what I caught!" There's no time for that. Get the shark in from the surf just far enough that it can be safely handled, snap a few photos and get it back to its home ASAP. In many of the photos I've seen of sharks on the beach, it's clear that the shark was gut-hooked. While gut-hooking does not necessary mean a death sentence for every fish, it certainly increases the chance for mortality. If a hook impaled in the gut isn't bad enough, imagine the internal damage to a shark that's done if the animal is dragged partially up the beach by the leader. The hooks would likely tear the stomach and impale other organs inside the animal. I know a lot of beach fishermen are wisely using circle hooks, but some are still doing things the old way and using big double hook rigs with J-hooks. Double J-hook rigs kill sharks. They should never be used. I know a lot of sharkers like to use large baits such as rays, and feel that two hooks are needed to keep the bait properly attached to the rig. That problem can be overcome with a little creative rigging and sometimes the use of cable ties or rigging wire. Single, non-offset circle hooks -- I suggest the Mustad 39960D -- are the only way to go for shark fishing from beach or boat. Still, circle hooks still have a 5-10 percent chance of gut-hooking. There's something about the way a shark's throat closes-up that too often traps even a circle hook and allows it to embed itself inside the shark rather than in the jaw as it was designed to do. Observing this, we began experimented with different rigs and hooks that would help ensure that sharks would be hooked in the jaw every time. What we came up with is what we call a blocker rig, a length of plastic pipe mounted perpendicular to the leader a specific distance from the hook. The pipe prevents or "blocks" the fish from swallowing the bait. We've documented an almost 100 percent success rate of preventing gut hooking since we started using these rigs in 2008. This season we're trying to determine if the blocker-rig is as effective at getting bites as a standard nonblocker rig. We've been fishing both type of rigs side-by-side and recording the results of every bite. So far our records indicate almost a perfect 50-50 split, indicating that the sharks are not shying away from the awkward looking rig. I didn't really plan on promoting this rig until we'd finished tweaking it out a bit more, but the aforementioned evidence of so many sharks being gut hooked from the beach has prompted me to do so now. I'm certain it has saved the lives of a lot of sharks that would otherwise have eventually died after being gut-hooked. Blocker rigs are easy to make using PVC or any other type of plastic pipe. For small sharks we use an 8-inch length of plastic tubing, drill a hole through its mid-section and run our wire leader through the hole. Using crimps or twisted wire, the pipe is fastened to the leader 4 inches above the eye of the hook; it can rotate but not slide up or down on the leader. When we expect larger sharks such as makos, blues, tigers, or sand tigers we'll use 14-inch lengths of half-inch PVC mounted 7 inches above the eye of the hook. For really large sharks such as big tigers we increased the length of the pipe to 24 inches since they have such wide mouths. The measurement from the eye of the hook to the pipe is important because if it's too long, the hook can still reach the shark's throat. Anyone who wishes to try making blocker rigs of their own are welcome to call me in the evening for more details at 410-213-2442 or e-mail me at modernsharking@ gmail.com. Source - A few things to consider before shark fishing | delmarvanow.com | The Daily Times
  8. It was a great day yesterday, the weather was perfect and the fish were plentiful. I took Chad Baniowski of Williamsburg Virginia out to the Chesapeake Light Tower. Chad is a Chef at Berrets Seafood Resturant in Historic Williamsburg so I am looking forward to getting some new recipes for ways to cook Spades from him. I had been telling him all about Spadefish and spear fishing and he was eager to give it a try. We departed Rudee Inlet around 0930 and went straight to the tower, it was nice, there was not another boat in sight so we had the tower to ourselves. The current was ripping but the visibility was decent at about 15-20 feet. There were tons of spade fish and we saw quite a few Amberjack as well. Chad speared his first spadefish and we were able to get our limit of 8 after a good workout of fighting the strong current and swells. Chad also tried some jigging but could not get one of the Jacks to bite, I am sure a live bait would have done the trick. About the time we were leaving two other jet skis showed up to try and catch some fish (I may be starting a jet ski trend). We were back at the ramp and on the road around 1530, just in time for rush hour traffic. Ha. The Chesapeake Light Tower is about 16 miiles off shore from Virginia Beach. I carry a Spot GPS Tracker with me here is the link to one of my "Spots" showing the Lat/Long of the tower. http://fms.ws/3BiSy/36.90466/\-75.71265 It was another great day, here are some of the pictures I took while out.
  9. Fish Report 7/25/10 Sea Bass Anchored on Quota "The basic steps needed to repair severely damaged fisheries are now well recognized; the quality and area of supporting habitats must be improved and fishing effort must be reduced." Bell et al. "Advances in Marine Biology - Restocking and Stock Enhancement of Marine Invertebrate Fisheries" Hi All, Fishing remains precisely as it has; Nick a few keeper cbass for dinner - catch a lot of throwbacks; Now and again we box 'em up pretty good. Flounder puzzle.. Evidence of the Yeti but nothing consistent. Teasing.. Heat's breaking. Hasn't been too bad at sea. Have to come home though! Weather's looking good now, after Monday's wind at least.. If you accept that Bell's quote above is true, then our restoration of sea bass, a reef fish, with no factoring of reef, is plainly imbalanced. Sea bass management in the mid-Atlantic is all --and only-- about catch restriction. No reef. Yet. Working on a new video that encourages factoring in that habitat. Lot of folks went to school. Get paid a guvmint wage.. I did my last video for the professional fisheries/regulatory community back in '04. It's still on YouTube. (search common seafloor habitat mid-atlantic) First one was for my Congressman in '01. I'll speak more plainly in the 2010 one.. If the solution to this fishery's restoration is well recognized, then our current system is imbalanced. I can't leave the dock without quota, without the good fortune of having escaped MRFSS overestimates; without an 'open season'.. Once I've left the dock though we can't anchor on a size limit or recreational quota. Have to have habitat: Reef. Balance. Fishing when we get a few folks. Mostly making them glad they went. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 Morning Star Fishing
  10. I am looking to spend around $50-$70 for a new rod for my daiwa AG9000B reel. I do most of my fishing off the delaware beaches. Any suggestions? Also I can't find the specs for my reel anywhere, I bought it used when I decided to try out surf fishing, and it has been a great reel, I just would like to know how big of line I can put on. It came with 30lb on it, and that is what I replaced it with. Thanks for any help.
  11. Hey guys! Me and my fiance will be down for the week of the 17th - 24th! Just wanted to see if anyone will be on the beach? Hopefully we will finally get down and meet everyone!!!!! We got all the rods packed and picking two more Ticas up when I get down! Only bad thing is no 4x4 permit for this year....as of yet!!!!! But anyway just wanted to see who all will be on the beach for the week. I am not sure if we will have internet connection but please feel free to call me or e-mail me! I am looking forward to hearing from you guys!!! hopefully we can wet a line together! Seya on the beach!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Cell - 717.991.3882 E-mail - Riseagainstus818@verizon.net
  12. I hit the pier looking for some spanish macks and blues ....I didn't hit any macks heck neither did anyone else...small blues did show up...the action was so slooow I took some randon shot of others
  13. We are having a great fun filled summer of fishing here in Edgewater Florida and Mosquito Lagoon. On my backcountry trips we have been catching all the summer species with fast fun action from all kinds of saltwater fish as listed below. On the Mosquito Lagoon, Redfish and Seatrout are being caught on each trip with the summer pattern of Redfish on the shallow flats and Seatrout on the deeper drop-offs. Pictured is my regular client George with a great Redfish, on George’s trip along with his 2 grandsons we caught 6 Reds and many Trout. Also pictured is new client Jerry with his 26” Seatrout, on this trip along with his 2 friends we caught 10 Reds up to 27”and several other smaller Trout. Come fish with me on beautiful Mosquito Lagoon for flats fishing, we will target Redfish, Seatrout.This type of sight fishing can be challenging and very rewarding when you hook up with a drag pulling Redfish,or Trout. Good for experienced anglers or the less experienced anglers looking for a new fishing challenge. Or you could try one of my Indian River Backcountry Fishing trips, that is mixed bag fishing for Seatrout, Redfish, Black Drum, Jack Crevalle, Ladyfish, Bluefish, Snapper, & many more saltwater fish. On the average Backcountry trip we catch between 10 and 15 (or more) different species of saltwater fish.You never know what will bite with this type of fishing, mainly drift fishing while free lining live shrimp on light tackle make for lots of rod bending and drag pulling. Fun for experienced anglers and an easy way for less experienced anglers to be successful at catching lots of fish. MY BOAT COMFORTABLY ACCOMMODATES 1 TO 4 ANGLERS Located close to DAYTONA BEACH, NEW SMYRNA BEACH and ORLANDO, FLORIDA. Feel free to contact me at any time with questions you may have about my fishing charters. CHILDREN ALWAYS WELCOME – FAIR PRICES Capt. Michael Savedow Edgewater River Guide, Inc. 386-689-3781 email> EdgewaterRiverGuide@cfl.rr.com website> Daytona Beach,Orlando,New Smyrna,Mosquito Lagoon,Redfish,Fishing Guide, Charter Fishing
  14. I hit the lake looking for LMB but found some crappies and trout ...Here's some shots from the trip I ran to another lake and found what I was looking for LMB
  15. Captain Rob Salimbene – Mangrove Man Charters June fishing has been a little slow for me this year, but with some hard work and some minor adjustments strategy wise we have been able to put some great days together and make for some memorable times on the water. Tarpon are still throughout the entire Tampa Bay area and within the coming weeks should make another strong showing. Most of the fish have moved offshore to take care of their spawning, but once they come back, they will be hungry and looking to eat. I prefer to fish 60lb. fluorocarbon leader rigged on a 7ft. heavy spinning rod with a 5/0 to 7/0 circle hook depending on the size of the bait. (smaller bait, smaller hook) Egmont Channel or the Sunshine Skyway are great places to start your Tarpon search. The best advice I can give for someone new to Tarpon fishing in these areas is to go out to one of these areas and watch how people are fishing; are they drifting, or anchored, are they using crabs or some type of baitfish, are people hooking up on the downtide or uptide side of the structure? Taking a little time to watch will ultimately lead to making you a better angler and will minimize the chance of you upsetting someone who understands how to fish that particular area. One of the best pieces of Tarpon advice I have ever heard is, “Go slow, like between idle speed and 1500 rpm’s and you will be amazed at how much you can pick up.” Another species I have been fishing the past couple of weeks have been redfish. I have been targeting redfish on the higher tides around oyster bars throughout the entire south bay area. The best bait I have found has been fresh cut threadfin chunks on a 2/0 circle hook. A lot of the areas I have been fishing are heavily pressured, and I believe that the cut threadfin is catching the most fish because it’s unthreatening. Nothing moving, just putting some stink on the bottom. Most of the fish I have been catching have been overslot, however there are a few mixed in that definitely could come home to the dinner table if you choose. Remember keep only what you will eat and revive the fish you put back carefully to make sure they swim off strongly. Lastly, the snapper fishing has picked up nicely and should only continue to get better in the next month. I have been targeting the snapper around the skyway, but all the local bay structures should be holding fish within the coming month. A small live greenback or a fresh piece of cut threadfin has been producing some snapper up to 17 inches. I prefer to chum some cut pieces of threadfin to get the fish active and then begin working hooked baits in the same area. 25lb fluorocarbon leader and a 2/0 circle hook has been producing very well in the past couple weeks. Overall the fishing is very good if you can tolerate the heat. I must say that I was concerned at how the fishing would be this summer following the hard freeze that we had this past winter. As a guide that relied on Snook for the majority of my charter trips, I was not sure how things would work out, but I have been pleasantly surprised at how well the fishery has held up and even how the Snook have recovered. There are definitely not the same numbers of Snook that we have seen in past years, but I think the future is still positive for our great fishery.
  16. By Captain Alan Sherman Seagrasses can be found all over the world in shallow bays, lagoons, estuaries and along coastal waters. Where there is water there are boaters navigating these waters successfully and often times not so successfully. In most areas the water is deep enough for their propellers to cut through the water without causing any damage to the bottom below them but the unsuccessful boaters that stray away from their appropriate depth of water can cause significant damage to the beds of seagrasses often unaware of how much damage they have created. As the propellers of these vessels make contact with the fragile seagrasses the propellers cut into the soft sand or mud bottoms creating a trench that is deeper than the waters adjacent to the freshly cut trench. Besides the propeller cutting the trench the propeller also cuts the fragile seagrasses leaving this deeper trench void of all seagrasses. The damage created is called a propeller scar or prop trail. A propeller scar may be just a few feet in length but can also be hundreds of yards or more in length. Almost immediately erosion of these propeller scars starts to take place making the trails wider and deeper and creating cloudy water from tidal flow and wave action. Seagrass meadows made up of one or many seagrasses such as turtle grass, shoal grass, manatee grass, star grass, widgeon grass, paddle grass and Johnson’s sea grass are very important to the shallow bays, lagoons and coastal waters all over the world because these seagrasses help provide protective nurseries and food sources for many marine species. These seagrasses also increase water qualities in the areas of the seagrass meadows and reduce wave energy along the coastlines. Columbia Sportswear, Bass Pro Shops and The Ocean Foundation have joined hands in an effort to restore seagrass meadows through education and habitat restoration. Recently I was invited take part in a two day event sponsored by Columbia Sportswear, The Ocean Foundation, Seagrass Recovery, Andy Newman, Bass Pro Shops and George Poveromo. The event was put together to bring awareness to how serious these propeller scars can be to our fragile bays, lagoons, shallow coastal waters and estuaries. During the event I had the opportunity to see firsthand propeller scars that had been accidently cut into fragile seagrass flats in Florida Bay off of Islamorada and then I got to take part in the actual repair of one of these propeller scars. With the guidance of the Seagrass Recovery project representatives, Kenny Wright and Beau Williams I was able to take part in repairing a propeller scar. Once at the sight of a propeller scar located just a few minutes from Wide World Sportsman in Islamorada it was quite obvious how bad a propeller scar actually is. I looked out on the beautiful green grass meadow only to see this horrific looking white stripe that had been cut into the meadow by a boater who thought there was more water under the propeller than there actually was. We anchored our boat and I donned a mask and snorkel and jumped into the crystal clear water that was just two feet deep. As I snorkeled the barren propeller scar it was obvious that the scar was deeper then the water surrounding it and that the seagrasses on the edge of that scar couldn’t grow into the trench. This scar was fairly new and had not grown much since the propeller scar had been created. Others joined me and then we started the repair of the propeller scar. First four foot biodegradable sediment tubes were place one at a time into the propeller scar. Once the propeller scar had been filled with these biodegradable sediment tubes long pieces of PVC tubing with wooden stands attached to the tops of the tube were driven into the ground and spaced out along the biodegradable sediment tubes. These biodegradable sediment tubes over the course of time will break down and completely fill the propeller scar bringing the depth of that scar back to its original level. The PVC tubes and stands are there to attract birds that will come and sit on the stands and eventually fertilize the area around the propeller scar with their guano. Three months after the biodegradable sediment tubes have been placed in the propeller scar, a crew from Seagrass Recovery will visit the site and plant seagrass plugs that were retrieved off the sea surface into the restored propeller scar. Twelve to eighteen months later the propeller scar will have been totally restored. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Seagrass Grow Project or would like more information on the Seagrass Grow Project than please visit these internet sites. Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) Sponsors of this Event were: Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) BassPro Shops/World Wide Sportsman (Bass Pro Shops Outdoors Online: Offering the best in Fishing, Hunting and Outdoor Products) Andy Newman, NewmanPR, the Florida Keys (NewmanPR) George Poveromo, Columbia Athlete, (George Poveromo's World Of Saltwater Fishing)
  17. Chinese mitten crabs, first reported in the Chesapeake Bay, are more widespread than initially thought. Four crabs have now been caught in Delaware Bay during the last week of May 2007, and may occur in other waters of the U.S. east coast. The "furry-looking" claws distinguish the Chinese mitten crab from native crabs. This Chinese mitten crab was caught by a waterman fishing for Blue crabs in the Upper Chesapeake Bay on May 18. (Credit: Greg Ruiz, Smithsonian) In total, seven adult male mitten crabs have been documented from the two bays since 2005. Prior to this, the potentially invasive species had never been recorded from coastal waters of the eastern United States. The mitten crab is native to eastern Asia and has already invaded Europe and the western United States, where it has established reproductive populations. The crab occurs in both freshwater and saltwater. Young crabs spend their lives in freshwater and migrate to saltwater estuaries for reproduction. Named for the unusual thick fur-like coating on its claws, the mitten crab looks very different than native crabs and is easily recognized. It is listed as injurious wildlife under the Federal Lacey Act, due to its potential to cause ecological and economic damage. "We don't know the present status of this crab along the eastern U.S. coast" said Gregory Ruiz, senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. "At the moment, it is not clear whether these crabs are reproducing or established in the Mid-Atlantic region, or whether the captured crabs are just a few individuals that originated elsewhere." These crabs may have arrived in the ballast water of ships or through live trade. A Mitten Crab Network has been established to examine the abundance, distribution, and reproductive status of crabs in Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay and other estuaries along the eastern United States. The initial partnership between the Smithsonian lab, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, is now being expanded to include resource managers, commercial fishermen, research organizations and citizens along the east coast. Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by Smithsonian.
  18. I am coming down in a couple weeks and I am wondering if anyone can tell me a bit about surf fishing in myrtle beach. can you fish right in front of the hotels? Is anything biting right now...(or in 2 weeks,)
  19. Hi everyone hope you have been enjoying the summer like weather we have been having lately. Feels like it is July or August. Let's start this report in the surf....the skates and sharks are still the main catch out there, but word has it that at night you can get a nice catch of kingfish while fishing with either live or artificial bloodworms. Most people are using the surf king fish rigs or a top and bottom rig with small hooks. Flounder fishing continues to be a good choice for the inlet. There have been lots of throw backs with some keepers in the mix. I would say that for every 10 fish you catch you may find 1 keeper. A first time fisherman, Terry Stough, of York, PA came into the shop on Friday and asked for some advice on what to use and where to go. We suggested a 6" Pearl Storm lure and sent him out to the Inlet to try his luck and two hours later he returned with an 8.8lb flounder he landed. A lot of people are jealous of a first time fisherman that lands a fish that big. Sonny Maio, of Northern Virginia, caught a 6.5lb flounder while fishing over on the VFW Slough. He was using a minnow on a plain flounder hook. The rock fishing has slowed down considerably since last week. The water temperatures have risen and any that are being caught are being caught at night with Poppers or other artificial lures such as black Bombers, Tsunamis or black bucktails with black worms. The bluefish are still around in the inlet, they are running on the incoming and outgoing tides. Just look for the birds and the choppy water and throw out a bucktail, Hopkins lure or a Kastmaster. They like anything shiney, and they do not require bait. The offshore bite has slowed down if you are looking for yellow fin in the Poor Man's. The fish seem to have followed the edge of the warm water that has pushed north. Boats that did try their hand at it came back in with mostly dolphin, gaffer size to peanuts, and there were a few lucky ones that had a blue fin. But the best catch of Saturday was the boat Liquid Handler with Anton Burr, Larry Watson and Howard Deaughtry. They left at 5pm on Friday night and came back to the dock with 3 Big Eye Tuna. They weighed 170, 155.2 and 103.5, along with a 40 yellow fin. Two more big eye broke off and a story of a midnight Mako fight that was at least 250lbs. They were glad that it broke off because they weren't prepared for that big guy. They were fishing way out at the Lindenkohl Canyon. That is one heck of a ride, but was all worth it to those guys. Congratulations!! The head boat Judy V. continues to see improvement in the black sea bass fishing with more keepers showing up on the wrecks. The half day trips have been seeing on average 2-3 fish per person. Some times the morning is better, sometimes the afternoon is better. This all depends on the tides and the winds. I guess that is why it is called fishing and not catching. There have also been nice sized tautog caught and released, but that all changes July 1st when tog season opens back up. We can't wait for that. We are fishing everyday both morning and afternoon. Reservations are recommended. The full day trip on the Capt. Bob II saw a lot of keeper black bass and a flounder as well. The full day trip runs on the Capt. Bob II and is limited to 25 people, and reservations are required for this trip. Flounder fishing in the ocean is starting to improve with a few more flounder coming in to the scales. Now don't think that they are setting the world on fire, but they are starting to bite more. Well that's all for this week! Keep Casting, Deanna (Mrs. Bert)</p><p>
  20. :)HI,LOOKING FOR A FISHING REPORT FROM YOUR AREA,IF YOU HAVE ANY PHOTO'S PLEASE ADD THEM ALSO.NOT A MEMBER?JOIN US IT'S EASY.HERE IS A VIDEO I MADE FOR YOUTUBE OF SOME SPRING ACTION ON THE CHESAPEAKE BAY.CLIKK TO START AND PAUSE FOR A MINUTE TO ALLOW IT TO LOAD,THEN IT WILL PLAY WITHOUT INTERUPTION.
  21. Would like to find a rod rack for my F 150, reasonable.
  22. If you were looking for good fishing action, then it was a great week to fish the inlet and a bad week to be a rock fish. The week had a slow start but then around Thursday that all changed. Rock fish started showing up on Thursday at the mouth of the jetty and steadily moved in for this week-end. Over all the bite improved both day and night. Sometimes it didn't seem to matter if it was day or night or what tide you were fishing on. The night bite was great on Friday with some people refering to it as a "Frenzy" all along the inlet. This all happened between the beginning and the end of the tide with many fisherman catching there limits with an hour or two. Paul Cronshaw and John Quattlebaum caught their limits Friday night before the thunderstorms. Others said they fished after the storms around 3am and they were still landing fish off the rocks or by boat. Fisherman reported catching anywhere from the bridge to the Coast Guard Station on both the North and South sides of the Inlet. Most fisherman have been catching there keepers using white bucktails with white worms, some have been fishing with Tsunami and Storm Lures. 5" & 6" lures in colors that range from golden mullet, shad or blue back herring. Most of the fish have been reported from 30" up to 45". We have had several brought in to the fish cleaning table that ranged in weight from 13-24lbs. Not to be out done by the inlet the surf had a few rock fish on Friday evening, before sunset. A 19lber was brought to our southern store in South Bethany from the surf at Bethany Beach. It was caught on a finger mullet. So you better have finger mullet along with that tried and true bunker bait. Blue fish were also reportedly being caught in the inlet, but not in any large numbers yet. They were of the snapper variety and ranging from 12"-16". Along with the blue fish the shad are schooling out in the inlet too. Most are snagging these fish with spec rigs of various sizes and colors. One man reported that he caught shad for almost 2 hours the other night. Flounder action has slowed a bit, but only more fisherman have turned their attention to fishing for the striper right now. A few flounder were brought in on Saturday. Minnows on plain hooks or bucktails, or Gulp "Pearl White Swimming Mullet" on a 1/2 oz jig head are still the ticket when fishing for the flatties. These fish are still being caught in the back bay around the same areas....Massey's Ditch and the VFW Slough. It is still is too early to see them out in the ocean. And while tog fishing is closed and black sea bass is still closed, ocean fishing is still in limbo. Only one week left until we can fish for those sea bass, we are counting down the days!!! Come on May 22nd. Until next time...keep casting, Mrs Bert (Deanna)
  23. What are a few of the reasons that make saltwater fishing so exciting and enjoyable? Is it that fact that the scenery is second to none? Is it because the salty air brings back old memories? For most anglers the endless possibilities of every cast is what draws most anglers back to the salt waters year after year. In the world of fresh water fishing when you go bass fishing, you catch bass. When you go catfishing, you catch catfish (or the occasional mudfish). In the world of salt water fishing you never know what you’re going to catch. And never has this been more apparent than during most of my recent fishing charters. We have over 20 different species of fish roaming our local waters right now and every day there are new surprises to be discovered on the flats. Most of the surprises come when my clients and I are fishing for Redfish or Speckled Trout basically because when targeting these two species we use a variety of techniques and cover a lot of ground which always increases the odds for oddities. During some of my most recent charters while targeting Redfish and Speckled Trout we have been lucky enough to also catch Sharks, Tarpon, Snook, Tripletail, Flounder, and some of the biggest Pompano I have seen in years. Casting Jigs with Shrimp, Berkley Gulps! And Jerkbaits have worked best when targeting anything and everything that swims but if you’re looking for a ton of excitement try throwing Topwater lures with a trailing fly behind it. This is one wacky rig, but when the conditions are right it can be a ton of fun. Speaking of a ton of fun if you didn’t hear already a new Tarpon fly fishing world record was set in our back yard this month. Congratulations! to Tom Evans who broke the 12lb tippet World Record with a Tarpon weighing in at over 195lbs. To put this in perspective Tom was fighting this fishing with a tippet that would normally be used for catching Bonefish or Redfish. The fact alone that this fish made it past the sharks is amazing enough, but to actually land this jumping, drag screaming Tarpon after a long battle is even more amazing. The Homosassa/Crystal River area is home to some of the largest Tarpon found any where in the world and a World Record fish could be jumped any day. A lot of hard work and dedication by both the guide and the angler is what is required when Tarpon fishing. That being said there is nothing more spectacular in the world of salt water fishing than to see the “Silver King” take air. A picture is worth a thousand words but when you see this spectacle in person you can expect a serious case of “Poon Fever” year after year during the months of May, June and July. So if you’re interested in enjoying a beautiful day on the water with endless possibilities feel free to contact Red Hot Fishing Charters today we can “Hook You Up!” Capt. Kyle Messier (352) 634-4002 kylemessier@yahoo.com Red Hot FIshing Charters - Captain Kyle Messier
  24. We are always having fun hunting for Redfish when fishing on Mosquito Lagoon. Pictured are my friend and client Randy and his son Scott showing off the 30” Red that Scott caught fishing with me on the flats. We caught 6 Reds while sight fishing a school on a beautiful, calm, Mosquito Lagoon morning. The other picture is Jake from North Carolina and his 5 pound Black Drum caught on one of my Edgewater Backcountry mixed bag trips. Also caught were 3 other Drum along with Seatrout, Bluefish, Jack Crevalle, Ladyfish, and more. Summer is coming soon with its picture perfect calm mornings, and light warm breeze, then our cooling afternoon sea-breeze. Fishermen and fish alike will be enjoying our wonderful, East Central Florida, Indian River, and Mosquito Lagoon salt water backcountry. I offer Mosquito Lagoon Flats Fishing trips for Redfish, Seatrout, & Black Drum .This type of sight fishing can be challenging and very rewarding when you hook up with a drag pulling Redfish, Drum, or Trout. Good for experienced anglers or the less experienced anglers looking for a new fishing challenge. I also offer Indian River Backcountry Fishing trips, that is mixed bag fishing for Seatrout, Redfish, Black Drum, Jack Crevalle, Ladyfish, Bluefish, Snapper, & many more saltwater fish. On the average Backcountry trip we catch between 10 and 15 (or more) different species of saltwater fish.You never know what will bite with this type of fishing, mainly drift fishing while free lining live shrimp on light tackle make for lots of rod bending and drag pulling. Fun for experienced anglers and an easy way for less experienced anglers to be successful at catching lots of fish. MY BOAT COMFORTABLY ACCOMMODATES 1 TO 4 ANGLERS Located close to DAYTONA BEACH, NEW SMYRNA BEACH and ORLANDO, FLORIDA. Feel free to contact me at any time with questions you may have about my fishing charters. CHILDREN ALWAYS WELCOME – FAIR PRICES Capt. Michael Savedow Edgewater River Guide, Inc. 386-689-3781 email> EdgewaterRiverGuide@cfl.rr.com website> Daytona Beach,Orlando,New Smyrna,Mosquito Lagoon,Redfish,Fishing Guide, Charter Fishing
  25. I hit the marina again ...looking for some bass and snakeheads ..well I found the bass I did see alot of herrings, w/perch and crappies.