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Found 57 results

  1. As usual, I read through the many fishing reports and see the amazing pictures of anglers proudly posing with their catch. By the time I have finished looking at the photos for the fourth time, the “fishy” part of my brain is creating a new list of excuses that may convince my wife to let me go fishing. Once I have finished explaining how the tide will be perfect for the next few hours, the weather forecast could not get any better and the tackle shop just received fresh bait, she usually gives her approval. In a rush to get out the door before she changes her mind, I find myself quickly going through my mental list of surf fishing necessities. Before I know it, I am on the sand wishing I had spent a little more time on that mental list. Depending on where you fish, having to run back to your house or the nearest tackle shop may not be a big deal, however if you fish areas like the southern end of Assateague Island, having to admit to your fishing buddy how you managed to forget the bait knife is not a good feeling. Some anglers like to step out for an hour or two and they don’t need to take much with them. On the other hand, if you are like me and can’t help but fish until it hurts, there are many items you can bring that will ease the pain. First of all, make sure you know the license requirements, regulations and creel limits for the beach you will be fishing. It is also a good idea to keep a fish species reference guide with you to help identify your catch. If you are not sure what you have caught, safely remove the hook and get it back into the water as fast as possible. A good photo will last much longer than any fish you will catch, so don’t hesitate to snap a quick picture. You will need something to help carry your gear through the soft sand. A surf fishing cart can be a great investment for fishing spots such as the North end of Assateague Island. On some beaches, such as the federal side of Assateague Island, you are allowed to drive your vehicle on the beach. This is very convenient for longer fishing trips that require more fishing gear. Of course you will need your surf fishing rod and reel, sinkers, hooks, and other basic fishing tackle. Choosing the type of tackle needed always depends on the species of fish you will be targeting. There are numerous options when it comes to choosing your tackle, however don’t let it overwhelm you. Your best bet will be checking out the fishing reports on the Internet and spending some time talking to the folks at our local tackle shops. They will be able to help you get an idea which rigs are best for your tackle box. You are going to need a cooler with ice to keep your bait fresh. It does not take long for the sun and warm air to dry out even the freshest bait. In the spring, the most commonly used baits, such as bunker or peeler crabs are going to need to be cut into pieces, so having a strong, serrated knife and cutting board are essential. The springtime sun can feel very warm at home; however the ocean breeze can feel surprisingly cold! Make sure you dress appropriately and have a good idea of the weather forecast. Even on those cloudy days, you will get sunburned so don’t forget sunscreen. Having a hat and a pair of polarized sunglasses will not only help with the sun’s glare on the water, it will also keep you from getting the painful “squint eye” headache. Wearing a comfortable pair of waterproof waders will certainly help keep your legs warm and dry when that unexpected wave sneaks up on you right in the middle of your cast. After you have heaved your bait into the surf, you are going to need a sturdy sand spike to hold your rod. When choosing your sand spike, make sure the bottom of your rod easily fits into the sand spike. In my opinion, the longer the sand spike, the better. You will need to shove it down into the sand far enough to be able to put pressure against it without it falling over. As the tide comes in and the sand becomes soft, make sure you frequently check your sand spike to ensure it does not move easily. One of the most common critters you are likely to catch is the Clearnose skate. Trust me, having a quality pair of needle nose pliers and fishing gloves will come in very handy when removing the hook from these spine covered bottom dwellers, as well as many other fish. Being able to sit down and rest while you wait for that record fish to swim by will make your trip much more enjoyable. Although your cooler can also serve as a seat, I recommend a lightweight beach chair with a cup holder. It’s always a good idea to bring something to eat and plenty of fresh water for drinking and washing your hands. Most importantly, you must remember you will be in constant contact with things that can hurt you if you fail to respect them. Think about it, you are dealing with sharp hooks and lead weights that are being hurled at incredible speeds. Be aware of the power of the ocean and the heat of the sun. There is always the possibility that you will have to unhook many different types of critters and just about all of them have some sort of natural defense. Excitement and adrenaline can take over very quickly when surf fishing and you have to remember to stay focused. Always have a first-aid kit and cell phone, especially if you are fishing alone. Although it may not be on your list of surf fishing gear, being safe is without a doubt the last thing you want to forget. Whenever possible, bring a friend with you. Not only can they help you untangle that spiny dogfish from your line, but in my opinion, sharing a good day on the beach with a buddy is a reward in itself.
  2. I have some family in town this week so i offered to take my uncle and cousins fishing. We headed out of wise point around 9am and found a nice smooth ride to the highrise. With my uncle, cousin Jim and the wife on board we started by drifting for flounder. Within minutes we had our first flounder on board caught by my wife. It was her first flounder ever but it came up an inch short. I tried around the piles for spades but only had a few nibbles and didnt even see any in the water. On one drift past the piles my uncle caught a nice triggerfish and a few minuts later i had one as well. This was my first trigger. He caught his on squid and mine was caught on shrimp. We continued to drift around hoping for that keeper flounder but after 9 caught and all thrown back we diecided to go to the 4th island. It didnt take long and we started to catch fish. Still no keepers though. Tried for spades at the 4th as well with no luck. We headed back to the highrise and caught a few more throw back flounder and headed in around 4. We ended the day with 12 flounder, all within an inch of legal size, countless huge oystertoads, black sea bass, 2 triggers around 4 lbs, and of course a ray. We caught fish constantly all day and had a great time. The best flounder bait seemed to be minnow/squid combo (best oyster toad bait too!!). I did catch one on a "lead head" with a twister tail tipped with squid while jigging across the bottom. Thanks to everyone that replied to my flounder rig question. We had a great time cating them. Maybe next time we can keep a few.
  3. Fish Report 8/1/10 Sea Bass Continue A Taste of Fluke How Goes the Watching? Hi All, Some outstanding fishing this week. Odd for heart of summer really. Take your luck where you find it I suppose. It certainly wasn't all gravy. As most clients were reeling in sea bass Wednesday, Flounder George & I twitched strips for fluke. Caught the heck out of 'em too. Tagged or just thrown back; He & I had no keepers in close to 40 fish. Not a back-bay trip, this was ocean fishing not quite 30 miles from the inlet. My mates both fished -on my direct order- for a short while. They of course both quickly caught a keeper and --being clear-thinking young men-- wisely and generously decided to allow George & Captain their fish-fry. Young Matt too: He hung a strip of cut-bait on his bottom hook and pushed aside all comers at the fish pool weigh-in, his six pound flattie easily trumping some very nice bass. Saturday we had a pleasant, sustained bite on sea bass with no flounder at all. Several mahi however were invited to dinner, one of which ran a solid 50 yards off Ralph's spinner before being worked back to the gaff. ..some clients had to go out to dinner this week too: bitter with the sweet. I really think fluke will bust loose soon, but I've been maintaining that position for some while.. I'm certain that we'll go fishing, not sure what we'll bring home. A new picture committed to personal memory: Chum overboard, two kites up, 4 baits out. With sea bass coming over the rail a Bruiser comes sliding in, investigating. Couldn't tell species. Big. Calorically unimpressive, our baits were investigated and left alone. This shark wanted at least a whole bluefish and perhaps would have preferred partaking of whale carcass.. Neat stuff.... Not so neat but of our time: It defies reason that we catch very respectable fish such as 18 inch flounder and 12 inch sea bass --fish that practically have Purdue Pop-Up baking timers built-in, yet have to throw them all back. MRFSS recreational catch estimate data is destroying constituents' good will toward management. It really is very poor recreational catch estimate data, the MRFSS data, that is, in many ways, strangling the rec-fish industry. Years ahead of management; in 1992 I was the first to put a 9 inch size limit on sea bass. At times a very ugly, heated effort; Resistance was intense. But the benefits were soon plain to see. We are no longer restoring with our releases; We are, instead, squandering our restoration. Strict adherence to data sets easily satired is where we lost sight of our target, of Fisheries Restoration. Conflict created by absurd statistic.. What now of the new Registry? The new MRIP program that should give a much better gauge of participation, Tell us how many fishers there are, The program designed to replace MRFSS.. Maryland's flounder anglers were granted a 3 month extension on season this spring with a very-stern warning: We'll Be Watching. That meant management would close the season early --Again-- if MRFSS said some segment of our recreational fishery had somehow managed to do better than the trawl industry -- Again. I know full-well that managers must do what the voices in MRFSS' hard-drive tell them. As a result I have come to know the deep anguish of early closure, of fiscal catastrophe from worthless statistic, of a season lost not to real oil gushing from a real pipe but meaningless numbers transmitted without wire. . . MRIP's registry.. How many people are really, actually going fishing.. I think that MRIP will show for MRFSS estimates to be correct it would often require that every registered angler had exceeded the legal limit many times over to achieve the statistically estimated catch. MRIP will force many catch estimates down, sometimes way down. Crazy-high estimates will be unsupportable if actually catching that many fish would require a "Catch Per Unit of Effort" far greater than the party/charter fishers experienced... Here's a measure we desperately need: Truth. OK Management: How goes the watching? What if the first result of "The Registry" was to loosen-up, to lower size limits.. That'd be a switch. Wonder if that could happen with the sudden ferocity of a closure.......... I hold that were it not for a very few boulders, storm caused shipwrecks & Nazi Wolf Pack torpedoes, our region's reef ecology --including the fish living on them-- would not have survived into the 1980s. On a budget, our fishery restoration efforts require forward thinking. Yet managers are still attempting to rebuild the huge fish populations of yesteryear with our present day seafloor habitat remnants, the footprint leftover from fishing's industrial revolution..... Consequently; if MRFSS paperwork sez private boats in Maryland caught zero tautog in all of 2006 yet caught 43,505 of these non-migratory man-made reef residents in 2007 - And it does: Then that's bloody-well what happened and quit'cher complaining already. If the scientific paperwork sez there ain't no reef where all those reef-fish and reef-loving lobster get caught, where once far more were caught - And it does: Then there ain't no reef so don't worry about it.. A blood-letting on the full moon with weekly leech treatments and two months of mountain airs should cure the insanity. That'd be some good 'ol fashioned doctoring: Nevermind lead's fumes when returning to work. We squander the economic benefits of 'catch-restriction only' restoration in the disappointment of anglers tossing fish overboard that they might otherwise have taken pictures of, fed their family and friends with.. This isn't billfishing: What goes in the cooler really does matter. In our hot-blooded quota battles caused by catch-data that infuriates, we --year after year-- miss opportunity to begin habitat restoration. Feet under a desk: Papers are real. Two anchors tight, lines down: Fish & fish habitat are real. Rock-Paper-Scissors: Coral grows on rock. Paper wins. Fishers lose. Needs Fixin. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 Morning Star Fishing
  4. Fish Report 6/20/10 Flying Fish & Cod Fishing All Week Hi All, I wrote last Sunday that fishing was quite good: Went out Monday and gave 'em a super-spanking with a light crowd, caught at least 20 keepers on the chartreuse gulp swimming mullet myself. Tuesday we laid in on account of forecasted high winds that never came; I know they never came because Capt. Greg -TowBoat Ocean City & OCRF President- volunteered a boat to NOAA to run a repair package out to the weather buoy: They took him up on it, 44009 is back - google & save for nearly real-time wind 15 miles out.. Back at it, we struggled to scratch dinner up Wednesday. Thursday most picked along on keeper bass & some tog. Beautiful water, tagging short flounders, watch flying fish scatter, tag some cod, see a pair of gaffer mahi under an ancient loggerhead sea turtle.. Can't say as I've seen flying fish, mahi & cod in the same piece of water before.. The folks who caught tog were saddened that it's sea bass only in the pool. They couldn't have known I had two of my top toggers aboard, guys that tried to go everyday we went in January & February.. Their six pound tog wouldn't have cut the mustard. It's sea bass only until I see a few more flatties - a fair pool. Driving to work Friday morning I see a traffic light change far ahead. Get to it; the first gear exhaust-cloud from the truck I passed is hanging: Still.. A true calm. Breezed up later; nice fishing. High man had 18. Saturday there was a couple guys aboard that have fished with me close to 30 years. Sea bass didn't care. Fussy. Scratch up dinner and a bit. A fin whale did cap the day though - a first for many. I may have enjoyed it more.. Something is just good about a 70+ foot animal in our part of the ocean. Looked like it was feeding on sand eels. Fish have been holding super-tight most days, hiding in the reef. Then, just today, I found fish feeding well up in the water. Holding tight either means they're laying in ambush for sand eels or butterfish; Or seeking habitat's cover when predators are about. When they're 20 or more feet off the bottom and holding we'll often find various plankton in them, feeding on what drifts by. The holding tight -waiting in ambush- behavior has, in fact, lead to higher release mortality on the 100+ foot reefs this year. We've been picking up and measuring many of those regulatory dead discards. What I tried to show scientists last year is, I think, evident in these measurements; That cbass over 11 inches have a harder time with barotrauma, the air bladder expansion. Cbass and those that target them are as BP's 'little people' in fisheries. Going to get heard though. We saw much better fishing with an 11 inch size limit and no creel. We had fantastic production when bottoms were growing back; when even tube worms, an emergent filter feeder that forms tubes -habitat- of sand and mud, were colonized by huge schools of sea bass. Been looking, can't find a single worm colony now. Do know where there's some dense sea-whip -a soft coral- on natural substrate; Know of rocks bare too where until recently growth and fish flourished. A two foot pipe -broken- will alter ecological history in the Gulf of Mexico, perhaps far beyond. We watch the catastrophe unfold on the news. Decade upon decade of gear dragged across our region's bottom did damage too. Spread over time, it's harder to see. Environmental .orgs cheer closure and catch restriction; Ignore environment. A 17 mile bay mouth to our south, 11 mile mouth to our north: Centuries. A broken two foot pipe: Months. Where billfish were once caught even 5 miles out before my time, we now have boats going 25/30 miles to just catch a few bluefish because they can not catch them on traditional grounds. This isn't all as the whalers a century and more ago thought; That as they exterminated local populations of whales they were perceived to have 'moved' until virtually the only ones left were too fast or too far hidden in ice fields. Those fellows, generations of them, did a lot of herding, of 'moving' as they thought. It was mostly the flensing. So have we - of fish. Yes we need catch restrictions - some quite complex to maximize stable bioeconomic results. That fin whale we saw Saturday was likely feeding on what many marlin fishermen have told me they frequently saw - sand eels. Not marlin fishermen of today though. The guys that fished in wooden 12 knot boats saw and cleaned-up sand eels in the cockpit--admittedly regurgitated from fish they had no intention of ever releasing. Still, the prey is more abundant inshore than where the fish are targeted now.. I think because Marlin and bluefish are sight feeders they can't reliably feed inshore anymore; They really are moving off as water quality diminishes; That no amount of fishery restoration will restore them to the inshore grounds without water quality. Catch restriction alone is a farce; Habitat in its many important forms must be grappled as well. C'mon oysters. C'mon coral. Tubeworm? Most likely. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 Morning Star Fishing
  5. Fish Report 10/29/09 Tog A CBass Prediction Wheat Field Hi All, Weather.. lots of weather. Not as bad as weather gets, but plenty bad enough to keep us in port. Tog should cooperate nicely - water temp dropping, mixing. Season opens back to 4 fish on November first. Going every chance we get - even with the very smallest of crowds - even if crew outnumber crowd. Calling for 10 knots in a long-period ground swell Friday... I listened to the House Sub-Committee on Oceans testimony Tuesday. My Congressman is on that Committee. He's heard from me. Brilliant people, especially Dr. Murawski--but human--and a guy I suspect is looking for a huge Government contract for monitoring catch made up the first panel. The second panel was fishers, mostly well-spoken and to the point. One group quite proud, the other angry. I was dismayed to hear what sounded like a verbatim recitation of a Pew press event from mid-summer coming from a NOAA scientist. The RFA's council, Mr. Moore, did a fine job. I thought his the best of the lot. Still, as the panels finished and the questions subsided.. I knew what it was to feel the wake of a passing freighter - while stranded in a life raft. No rescue - not this time.. Perhaps the financial distress caused by this "Emergency Closure" will be a catalyst for improving management. Tagging studies being definitive, habitat fidelity solidly established, dividing the mid-Atlantic into 3 or 4 regions/zones and splitting the quotas/allotments is absolutely necessary. This is the most critical change needed: Create regionally controlled quotas for winter to ensure that massive over-fishing does not occur on a single regional sub-stock. Apparently, sea bass abundance to our north is where ours was 5 years ago, at least according to the data. Remember, the need for some regulation was so obvious that fishers acted. In Maryland we had a 6 year head start on management, our 9 inch size limit giving us a solid lead when federal management came. Our stock grew incredibly soon after the creel limit was introduced, and then collapsed. In 2003 sea bass were so abundant I honestly thought we were nearing the habitat's holding capacity. I suspect what happened to our fish will now continue time after time, regionally. The currently-peaking northern area will experience heavy trawl pressure in January, February and March because it is the most valuable part of the stock. Bigger sea bass are worth more per pound, that's where the money is: it will be targeted. This heavy pressure, recreational included, on a regional stock; this mature cbass stock with the males all grown into legal size, and virtually none sub-legal, will get hit heavily and start to topple. Removal of the males, furthered by continued--even increasing--recreational and nearshore artisanal fishing in spring, will create a spawning shortfall come summer. Imbalanced, that area's cbass population will no longer replenish faster than fishing is removing--regional collapse then unforestallable. Meanwhile, other areas will be in better population phase, have more numerous fish. Statistics which only deal in coastwide stock assessments will camouflage on paper the heavily pressured sub-stock's problem. Unnoticed in the whole of the coastal data set, that regional fishery then collapses to below size-limit. The cycle, the rebuilding, begins anew as more small sea bass transition to male and create a new spawning stock. In aquarium settings sea bass transition very rapidly from female to male when a single male is removed from amidst females. That is not what I observed here after our most recent collapse in early 2004. Males never completely absent, it wasn't until 2008 that they were abundant, far more so this year--most sub-legal. From Cape May to Chincoteague we are well into the upturn--and would have enjoyed it far more had the size limit remained 12 inches. In 3 years, maybe 2, we'll be where the northern region is now; where we were in 2003. In 3 or 4 years we start all over. Unless its sooner. Or it gets fixed. Shutting us down on sea bass was, and remains, rubbish. Some are willing to peel back the watery veil and have a look. Most--including the power centers--are all about paper crossing a desk. No scholarly work exists with our natural reefs on them. While I have written several papers, made video: its anecdotal.. There's virtually no scholarly knowledge of mid-Atlantic natural seafloor habitat. There's no paper to cite. Without efforts to find out what habitat is missing, protect what remains, and restore at least the natural footprint of reef in the mid-Atlantic; the cycle I've described above could worsen depending on habitat impacts. You can not restore squirrels to a wheat field, nor can you restore reef-fish to barren bottom. A pile of horse-feathers is any claim of rebuilding reef-dwelling species without knowledge of their habitat. Managing sea bass is all about controlling fishing pressure on discreet habitats; its succesful restoration measured via the regional holding capacity of its reefs. The bold assertion of grand economic gains for survivors of this regulatory tempest--fisheries quickly rebuilt--are hollow, if not disingenuous; disappearing into thin air upon realization that we now manage fish by sky-fall, not reef production. Coastwide catch-restriction creates oscillation in sea bass abundance. The peaks will remain temporary, and the valleys more economically destructive, without a solid foundation of habitat and a method of maintaining a sub-legal spawning stock.. Unless you just close the fishery. Bloody fine bit of management that. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 http://www.morningstarfishing.com/
  6. Tarpon, sailfish, dolphin (mahi-mahi), kingfish, blackfin tuna, bonito, and skip jack tuna are all off the Miami/Miami Beach coast and they have all been hungry and feeding. It has not made much of a difference which way the wind is blowing from nor how hard it blows. The key factor has been current. Even on the days when there has been little to no current, the fish have still been feeding. On the no current days they are more spread out over a greater depth. All the various methods of presenting baits have been producing their fair share of fish. On several days, the flatlines saw action before I could deploy the mid-depth or bottom rods. Even with enough wind to fly a kite, the action on the flatlines, mid-depth, and bottom rods has been so good that there was no time to get the kite up and flying. On other days, the kite has produced the most action. Inshore at the Inlets, the action for tarpon has been outstanding. The fish have been putting on a great show with their rolling antics. Persistence has paid off on more than one occasion when it took a while to get a hit in the deep water. Once we got the first hit, then the action picked up and many anglers have gotten sore backs and arms while doing battle with the mighty tarpon. Throw in hits from mangrove and mutton snapper along with some snook action and you have a fun filled evening. Bill Parr along with Sandra & Michele Wright, and Chris Ferrell saw the good and frustrating parts of dolphin fishing. Bill spotted working birds and we ran out to investigate. We quickly hooked up a dolphin, then another, and watched as numerous fish swam along with us and would not feed. We worked another flock of birds with the same results. And so it went for the remainder of the morning. Hook a fish or two and then try to get the rest of the fish to cooperate. The final results were several meals of dolphin fillets. Brian Jinks and several friends fished an evening tarpon trip at Government Cut. We hooked and fought a beautiful 90 pound tarpon in the deep water and it took two anglers to whip the fish. The anglers were exhausted and the fish gave us a good tail slap on the water's surface as I released the fish to fight again on another day. Throw in action with mangrove and mutton snapper while waiting for another tarpon strike. The final fish of the evening was one that Brian talked about and was hoping for. He thought he was hooked to the bottom, however, the bottom moved and with steady pressure, he got his wish. The snook posed for a few pictures and was carefully unhooked, revived, and released. Craig Dunn and Zair Fishkin had their hands full. By that I mean steady and constant action on all except for one drift during their 3/4 day trip. It started with a double kingfish bite before I could get the bottom rod unwrapped and deployed. It continued with more kingfish on flatlines, mid-depth, and bottom rods. On two drifts, we limited out on kingfish and then released them after that point. When the action slowed down in the shallower depths, I allowed our drift to continue out deeper and then the dolphin (mahi-mahi) started. It was a single, then a double, then more singles. All the fish were in the 6 - 12 pound range. The bottom rod continued to see action with kingfish that were released. Then bonito and skipjack action. The kings attacked our baits in the 100 - 190 foot depth range and the dolphin in the 150 - 350 range. Ed & Laura Ward along with Mark Rachal saw great action on their 3/4 day trip. We broke the ice on this trip with a sailfish that hit the break away lead outfit fished at a mid-depth. Mark did the honors as Laura took pictures and Ed helped clear rods and gave moral support to Mark. Then the bottom rod took over with kingfish and bonito action. The dolphin on this trip were smaller and much more picky. Ed seemed to have the magic touch with the dolphin along with Laura. Everyone got in on the kingfish action and Laura had the toughest fight on the bottom rod with the bonito. Jeff Godel's birthday present from his Dad was a fishing trip. It started out slowly and built momentum as the trip progressed. The current had dropped off almost completely from the previous several days. We missed several fish on the bottom rod and the small dolphin just molested our baits for the most part. The wind switched to the east and picked up some speed. Up went the kite and the action began to improve. First with a blackfin tuna, then a sailfish. The sail put on a good show and strong fight. Jeff countered its every move with one of his own. We pulled the sail along side and Jeff gave it a pat of thanks before we released it. After reorganizing and putting out fresh baits, the long kite bait saw almost immediate action with a nice 20 pound plus kingfish. The final drift of the trip had more small dolphin grabbing our baits and allowing us to bring them to the boat before jumping and spitting the baits back at us. That brings me up to date once again. As it is easy to see, the action is great. All it takes on your part is a phone call 305 965-9454 or email nkostyo@bellsouth.net to get in on the action. The dolphin will be getting bigger and more cooperative. The blackfin tuna will become more prominent over the next several months. Sailfish will continue to please many anglers with their acrobatic jumps and leaps. Tarpon will grow in size and 100 pound plus fish will test the angling ability and stamina of many anglers. You and your family or friends can be the ones to experience most or all of this. Just contact me and get a date on my schedule. Captain Dave Kostyo Knot Nancy Fishing Charters, Inc. 305 965-9454 Cell Charter Fishing in Miami and Miami Beach for Sailfish, Tarpon, Dolphin and Kingfish aboard the Knot Nancy nkostyo@bellsouth.net
  7. Obama moving to limit fishing access - ESPN The Obama administration has ended public input for a federal strategy that could prohibit U.S. citizens from fishing some of the nation's oceans, coastal areas, Great Lakes, and even inland waters. Anglering for access united we fish rally capitol washington fishing AP/Luis M. AlvarezOne sign at the United We Fish rally at the Capital summed up the feelings of recreational and commercial fishermen. This announcement comes at the time when the situation supposedly still is "fluid" and the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force still hasn't issued its final report on zoning uses of these waters. Fishing industry insiders, who have negotiated for months with officials at the Council on Environmental Quality and bureaucrats on the task force, had grown concerned that the public input would not be taken into account. "When the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) completed their successful campaign to convince the Ontario government to end one of the best scientifically managed big-game hunts in North America (spring bear), the results of their agenda had severe economic impacts on small family businesses and the tourism economy of communities across northern and central Ontario," said Phil Morlock, director of environmental affairs for Shimano. "Now we see NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and the administration planning the future of recreational fishing access in America based on a similar agenda of these same groups and other Big Green anti-use organizations, through an Executive Order by the President. The current U.S. direction with fishing is a direct parallel to what happened in Canada with hunting: The negative economic impacts on hard-working American families and small businesses are being ignored. "In spite of what we hear daily in the press about the President's concern for jobs and the economy and contrary to what he stated in the June order creating this process, we have seen no evidence from NOAA or the task force that recreational fishing and related jobs are receiving any priority." Unless more anglers speak up to their Congressional representatives so their input will be considered, it appears the task force will issue a final report for "marine spatial planning" by late March. President Barack Obama then could possibly issue an Executive Order to implement its recommendations. Led by NOAA's Jane Lubchenco, the task force has shown no overt dislike of recreational angling. As ESPN previously reported, WWF, Greenpeace, Defenders of Wildlife, Pew Environment Group and others produced a document entitled "Transition Green" shortly after Obama was elected in 2008. What has happened since suggests that the task force has been in lockstep with that position paper, according to Morlock. In late summer, just after the administration created the task force, these groups produced "Recommendations for the Adoption and Implementation of an Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes National Policy." This document makes repeated references to "overfishing," but doesn't reference recreational angling, its importance, and its benefits, both to participants and the resource. Additionally, some of these same organizations have revealed their anti-fishing bias with their attempts to ban tackle containing lead in the United States and Canada. Also, recreational angling and commercial fishing have been lumped together as harmful to the resource, despite protests by the angling industry. Morlock's evidence of collusion -- the green groups began clamoring for an Executive Order to implement the task force's recommendations even before the public comment period ended in February. On Feb. 12, the New York Times reported on that "President Obama and his team are preparing an array of actions using his executive power to advance energy, environmental, fiscal and other domestic policy priorities." Anglering for access Click here for archive Morlock fears that "what we're seeing coming at us is an attempted dismantling of the science-based fish and wildlife model that has served us so well. There's no basis in science for the agendas of these groups who are trying to push the public out of being able to fish and recreate. "Conflicts (user) are overstated and problems are manufactured. It's all just an excuse to put us off the water." In the wake of the task force's framework document, the Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation (CSF) and its partners in the U.S. Recreational Fishing & Boating Coalition again voiced their concerns to the administration. "Some of the potential policy implications of this interim framework have the potential to be a real threat to recreational anglers who not only contribute billions of dollars to the economy and millions of dollars in tax revenues to support fisheries conservation, but who are also the backbone of the American fish and wildlife conservation ethic," said CSF President Jeff Crane. Morlock, a member of the CSF board, added, "There are over one million jobs in America supported coast to coast by recreational fishing. The task force has not included any accountability requirements in their reports for evaluating or mitigating how the new policies they are drafting will impact the fishing industry or related economies. "Given that the scope of this process appears to include a new set of policies for all coastal and inland waters of the United States, the omission of economic considerations is inexcusable." This is not the only access issue threatening the public's right to fish, but it definitely is the most serious, according to Chris Horton, national conservation director for BASS. "With what's being created, the same principles could apply inland as apply to the oceans," he said. "Under the guise of 'marine spatial planning' entire watersheds could be shut down, even 2,000 miles up a river drainage from the ocean. "Every angler needs to be aware because if it's not happening in your backyard today or tomorrow, it will be eventually. "We have one of the largest voting blocks in the country and we need to use it. We must not sit idly by."
  8. The Obama administration will accept no more public input for a federal strategy that could prohibit U.S. citizens from fishing some of the nation's oceans, coastal areas, Great Lakes, and even inland waters. AP/Luis M. Alvarez One sign at the United We Fish rally at the Capital summed up the feelings of recreational and commercial fishermen. This announcement comes at the time when the situation supposedly still is "fluid" and the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force still hasn't issued its final report on zoning uses of these waters. That's a disappointment, but not really a surprise for fishing industry insiders who have negotiated for months with officials at the Council on Environmental Quality and bureaucrats on the task force. These angling advocates have come to suspect that public input into the process was a charade from the beginning. "When the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) completed their successful campaign to convince the Ontario government to end one of the best scientifically managed big game hunts in North America (spring bear), the results of their agenda had severe economic impacts on small family businesses and the tourism economy of communities across northern and central Ontario," said Phil Morlock, director of environmental affairs for Shimano. "Now we see NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and the administration planning the future of recreational fishing access in America based on a similar agenda of these same groups and other Big Green anti-use organizations, through an Executive Order by the President. The current U.S. direction with fishing is a direct parallel to what happened in Canada with hunting: The negative economic impacts on hard working American families and small businesses are being ignored. "In spite of what we hear daily in the press about the President's concern for jobs and the economy and contrary to what he stated in the June order creating this process, we have seen no evidence from NOAA or the task force that recreational fishing and related jobs are receiving any priority." Consequently, unless anglers speak up and convince their Congressional representatives to stop this bureaucratic freight train, it appears that the task force will issue a final report for "marine spatial planning" by late March, with President Barack Obama then issuing an Executive Order to implement its recommendations — whatever they may be. Led by NOAA's Jane Lubchenco, the task force has shown no overt dislike of recreational angling, but its indifference to the economic, social and biological value of the sport has been deafening. Additionally, Lubchenco and others in the administration have close ties to environmental groups who would like nothing better than to ban recreational angling. And evidence suggests that these organizations have been the engine behind the task force since before Obama issued a memo creating it last June. As ESPN previously reported, WWF, Greenpeace, Defenders of Wildlife, Pew Environment Group and others produced a document entitled "Transition Green" shortly after Obama was elected in 2008. What has happened since suggests that the task force has been in lockstep with that position paper. Then in late summer, just after he created the task force, these groups produced "Recommendations for the Adoption and Implementation of an Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes National Policy." This document makes repeated references to "overfishing," but doesn't once reference recreational angling, its importance, and its benefits, both to participants and the resource. Additionally, some of these same organizations have revealed their anti-fishing bias by playing fast and loose with "facts," in attempts to ban tackle containing lead in the United States and Canada. That same tunnel vision, in which recreational angling and commercial fishing are indiscriminately lumped together as harmful to the resource, has persisted with the task force, despite protests by the angling industry. As more evidence of collusion, the green groups began clamoring for an Executive Order to implement the task force's recommendations even before the public comment period ended in February. Fishing advocates had no idea that this was coming. Perhaps not so coincidentally, the New York Times reported on Feb. 12 that "President Obama and his team are preparing an array of actions using his executive power to advance energy, environmental, fiscal and other domestic policy priorities." Click here for archiveMorlock fears that "what we're seeing coming at us is an attempted dismantling of the science-based fish and wildlife model that has served us so well. There's no basis in science for the agendas of these groups who are trying to push the public out of being able to fish and recreate. "Conflicts (user) are overstated and problems are manufactured. It's all just an excuse to put us off the water." In the wake of the task force's framework document, the Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation (CSF) and its partners in the U.S. Recreational Fishing & Boating Coalition against voiced their concerns to the administration. "Some of the potential policy implications of this interim framework have the potential to be a real threat to recreational anglers who not only contribute billions of dollars to the economy and millions of dollars in tax revenues to support fisheries conservation, but who are also the backbone of the American fish and wildlife conservation ethic," said CSF President Jeff Crane. Morlock, a member of the CSF board, added, "There are over one million jobs in America supported coast to coast by recreational fishing. The task force has not included any accountability requirements in their reports for evaluating or mitigating how the new policies they are drafting will impact the fishing industry or related economies. "Given that the scope of this process appears to include a new set of policies for all coastal and inland waters of the United States, the omission of economic considerations is inexcusable." This is not the only access issue threatening the public's right to fish, but it definitely is the most serious, according to Chris Horton, national conservation director for BASS. "With what's being created, the same principles could apply inland as apply to the oceans," he said. "Under the guise of 'marine spatial planning' entire watersheds could be shut down, even 2,000 miles up a river drainage from the ocean. "Every angler needs to be aware because if it's not happening in your backyard today or tomorrow, it will be eventually. "We have one of the largest voting blocks in the country and we need to use it. We must not sit idly by." This is an opinion column from Robert Montgomery. As a Senior Writer for BASS Publications, Montgomery has written about conservation, environment, and access issues for more than two decades.
  9. Had a great time today at the Bull Island Anglers Club lead pouring party at Craig’s House here in Poquoson, Virginia. Had a good turnout with people coming and going through out the day. Everyone either brought scrap lead or molds. There was more than enough to go around, I arrived with about 30 lbs of big pieces of lead and left a good variety of inline, egg, and pyramid sinkers. A couple of guys made up a bunch of lead heads as well. We even had some excitment when someone accidenty threw some old lead in the pot that must of been damp and we had a nice lead explosion that covered half us. Luckily no one was hurt. Of course most of the conversation was about fishing and we are all eagerly waiting for spring. When it does come we will all be ready with our fresh buckets of sinkers! Here are a couple of pictures from today.
  10. Winter time is in full force in Miami right now and if you brave the seemingly constant 20 MPH winds, there is plenty of action to be had. The last few weeks I’ve been concentrating my efforts on fishing for mackerel on fly and having a blast. Here is a pic from a few days ago. They key for this type of fishing in deeper than 20’ of water is using an intermediate sinking line and clousers. Often the macks will hit right on the surface but other times throughout the day they will go deep and that’s when the sinking fly line helps keep the action going. If you head out for some macks on fly make sure you do several things, 1) bring plenty of flies as those teeth make short work after just a few fish, 2) add about two inches of light wire trace as a bit tippet, 3) strip the fly fast and 4) be patient, if the bite stops keep looking for them by going back to the general area you were finding them and letting the fly sink to a count of 20 to 30 or more. Moving away from mackerel, some of the biggest bonefish of the year are out prowling the flats, these are very smart fish so make long accurate casts and give them a long lead so as not to spook them. The finger channels will hold an assortment of snappers, mackerels, and some groupers (remember there is a grouper clouser), the west side of the bay will hold snook in the creeks and trout in the deeper grass flats. The patch reefs in 10-30’ of water can be red hot and the murkier the water the better. Enjoy the super bowl tomorrow and get out there and make that drag scream! Capt. Mo Estevez New Dawn Charters 305-495-7397
  11. While I have the time between trips, lets get caught up again with the activity out of the Haulover Inlet area aboard Knot Nancy. Over the last week, there has been no current in the area. That area ranged from south of the Twins to the north end of Haulover Beach. Despite this less than ideal condition, the fishing has been quite productive. Wind conditions have range from 5 to 19 knots and have come from all directions. I've had some stout hardy anglers who have been rewarded with many eating style fish. In on the beach, the tarpon continue to please anglers by giving them a great fight and show with their powerful runs and acrobatic leaps and jumps. Bill Parr, Sandy & Michelle Wright, and Chris Ferrell combined to catch a variety of fish that included kingfish, bonito, red grouper, and spanish mackerel. Jeff Godel, Dave Bonebreak, Dave Thome, and Steve Severance got into some heavy dolphin action. Throw in kingfish and spanish mackerel to round out the day. The dolphin were under birds in 155' and on weedlines in the 750' - 850' range. Thanks Jeff for the help with filleting all the dolphin your group caught. Dan & Don Samuelsen, Robert Henderson, and David Good experienced the roughest sea conditions with wind from the ENE/ESE @ 13 - 17 knots. Almost as soon as we put baits in the water, the action started and remained steady through most of the trip. The kingfish and bonito were snapping and with no current, we even managed to catch a couple of the pesky triggerfish that kept stealing our bait. The bottom rod had the most action on this trip with just a few hits on the break away lead and flatline outfits. All the action came in the 120 - 160 foot range. Joe Ballarini and Samantha Cunningham got into some good action as well. We fished a 6 hour afternoon/evening combo. During the afternoon portion of the trip it was kingfish and rainbow runner. Just before sundown we moved in to Haulover Beach and topped off the trip with an 80# tarpon. These two anglers also qualify as Vikings since the winds on their trip were E/ESE @ 13 - 19 knots. Rob Fitzpatrick, Dave Fitzpatrick, and Caitlin Fitzpatrick had a goal in mind. The goal was to catch 8 year old Caitlin her first fish. The SE winds @ 11 - 13 knots had the seas a bit on the sloppy side. It took one drift and some slow trolling to get the goal accomplished, however, Caitlin caught her first fish. The bonito put up a hard pulling battle and Caitlin was wondering if she would ever get the fish in. Her persistence paid off and she won the battle and was all smiles. At that point, the motion of the ocean started to get to her and she laid down for a rest while her Dad (Dave) and uncle (Rob) took over. We added another bonito and a few kingfish before the half day trip was over. The kings came on the bottom rod and the bonito on the flatlines. The breakaway lead rod finally produced in the form of a remora or as I call them "sneaker heads". Caitlin got quite a thrill when she put her hand on top of the remora's suction cup. It brought another big smile to her face. Just another great example of Family Fishing Is Fun. John Vassallo and Tanya Liebal got in on the good weather before the most recent cold front came through. Tanya wanted to try for some dolphin. We found a weedline in 350' in green water and worked it for a while with no results. We ran out to 800' and slow trolled baits back toward shore before deciding to run back in. We found another weedline on a blue/green edge in 350' and worked it. The birds put us on the fish and we picked off one dolphin at a time as we followed the school as they moved south along the weedline. Tanya had the hot rod and caught 4 dolphin before John got his first. The school disappeared and we continued on in to check out the kingfish action. The SSW/SW wind was pushing us offshore so we started in 110'. When we reached 130' the breakaway rod came to life and John got a kingfish. While trying to put the weight back on the line, it got jerked out of my hand as another kingfish ate our offering of a live pilchard. Then a flatline hooked up and so it went until we reached 140'. At that point, the action stopped and we moved back in. Once again the breakaway lead rod started the action. Tanya caught another king and while we were fighting that fish, a flatline took off and John was back in the action. John's fished weighed in at 26 pounds back at TNT Marine Center. The limit of kingfish we caught took just two drifts. Despite the lack of current, the kingfish, dolphin, and bonito have given us plenty of action, lots of smiles, and some good eating fillets. Throw in the good tarpon action and you have the makings of a great day of fishing. If you want to get in on this action just call me at 305 965-9454 or email me nkostyo@bellsouth.net to schedule your trip. Captain Dave ---------------------------------------------------------
  12. December 25, 2009 Sarasota Florida Fishing Report By Capt. Bob Smith Pompano are getting thicker on the Stephen’s Point grass-flats just a little south and off of the Ringling home. Although the fishing has been improving throughout December, we had a slow start Wednesday afternoon. Due to the wind, I opted to fish the east side of the bay for a slower drift and less chop. We fished with live shrimp on and around the Stephen’s Point grass-flats for two hours and hardly lost any bait. Then the wind slowed just a little and the fish started to chew. Pompano, large Spanish mackerel, 3 to 4 pound bluefish and some nice seatrout made our afternoon. We also caught some large ladyfish in the mix. I am sure that my D.O.A. and Silly Willy jigs would have worked just as well as the live shrimp but I didn’t want to take the time to re-rig or change our luck. Earlier in the week I found a large school of Spanish mackerel just outside of New Pass by the small red and green markers. The birds were diving and the fish were boiling as they fed on the schools of baitfish. The macks were mostly small but keeper size. We did well with Silly Willy jigs, especially when we tipped them with a small belly strip from the mackerel we kept. Of course live bait was also working. Over the past few weeks, some the biggest mackerel we caught were in Big Pass, some almost 30” long. There have been reports of some keeper size gag grouper being caught on the bay. I have not targeted them myself lately but I plan to do so soon. My favorite bait for them is fresh caught pinfish, not over night baits from the bait shop. Pinfish will almost always dive to the bottom, so no lead is needed. Most of the water depths you may fish on the bay are only 10 to 20 feet deep. When a pinfish dances on top of the water it is a good sign of predators below. If it is grouper below, you will see your bait simply disappear under the surface, not a surface blast like a bass would do. If your bait disappears, don’t wait more then a few seconds and start cranking like mad until you feel the weight of the fish. Then set the hook hard and keep the fish moving away from the structure. I never like to fish over the structure on the bay. I cast to it so that I don’t run off the larger fish. I may mark a structure by dropping a marker to the side or behind it, out of my way but still giving me a reference point for casting. To have any consistency at bringing keeper size grouper to the boat, you need to use at least 20lb test line, 60lb test mono leader, stout 4/0 to 6/0 hook and lock down your drag. With grouper, you don’t have the option to let them run. Remember, this is for large bay grouper and not deep water offshore grouper. This is a good starter method but not the only method for grouper on the bay. Enjoy & Protect My Website: http//www.sarasota-fla-fishing.com
  13. Here's a quick update before heading into the last week of 2009. We gone from calm weather to windy weather. With each condition, there has been a general lack of north current. A few sailfish are being caught, however, the best catches aboard Knot Nancy have been with dolphin, kingfish, bonito, and some mutton snapper. Cory Reeves enjoyed the variety I mentioned above. The kingfish and bonito came on both the bottom and break away lead rods, while all the dolphin were on the flatline outfits. The good news about the dolphin was that all the action came in the 90 - 190 foot range. This meant that we didn't have to make long runs offshore in search of the acrobatic, colorful, tasty fish. Cory brought along one of his favorite outfits and the kingfish was kind enough to eat the bait we had on it. The bonito put a severe bend in the bottom rod and did plenty of pulling. Fabio Nick took home enough dolphin fillets for several hearty meals. The action took place straight out from Government Cut in 320 - 360 feet of water. The birds put us on the location and the action was fast and furious for a while using both slow troll and drift methods. Then the wind began to blow with the approach of a cold front. John Perkins, his 9 year old son, Jonas, father-in-law, Gordon Ring, and long time friend, Brad Coren can only be described as Vikings. The NE/ENE winds @ 21 - 24 knots created sloppy seas on top of rough conditions. We drifted with no action, then we chased birds only to come upon a large school of porpoise feeding under the diving birds. Back to drifting and the break away lead produced a kingfish for Gordon. More chasing birds and Jonas caught his first dolphin. It was a schoolie size fish that put a gigantic smile on his face. Two baits got chopped in half behind the hook and toward the end of the morning Jonas said he was happy and ready to get back to some calmer water. With one week left in 2009, the weather forecast makes it sound like we should have some great conditions for sailfish as well as numerous other species. I have one day open through next week. Why not spend the last day of the year enjoying a fishing trip? Our weather sure beats what our friends up north have had to put up with. All it takes is a phone call or email. Captain Dave -----------------------------------------------------
  14. The Lady Pamela II crew headed out for an all day Swordfish trip that lead into the night. Around lunch time, we reached our first destination of 1,800 ft of water. The first drop of the day didn’t produce much. The second drop was an instant bite but right before we got tight the Swordfish managed to pull the hook and free itself. Fifteen minutes into our third set and we were hooked. It was a battle between us and a huge Sword for 30 minutes. As soon as we got the leader, things went south and our fish disappeared. It was a bummer, but things could’ve been worse = no bites. Time flies when you’re having fun; the sun started to set and it was time to get our nighttime gear ready. Within an hour of nighttime Sword fishing, Kevin had a nice fish on the line. We all called it a 100 lb’er until the 212 lb’er was in the boat. Gear went back out immediately; we were ready to get our hands on another Broadbill. Our last fish of the night was a 45 incher that swam away a free man for a future fight. Tight Lines!
  15. Surface water temperatures in the ocean have been between 88 - 91 degrees. In Biscayne Bay it's been even higher. With the temperatures this high, it calls for a change in technique to have a reasonable chance at a successful trip. In the ocean, fishing your baits deeper will improve your chances. In the Bay, fishing early and at night will help combat the high temperatures. Dolphin fishing has improve slightly. By this I mean that you will have to search long and hard to catch between 5 to 8 fish on a 3/4 to full day of fishing. The best bet for good steady action still remains fishing the reef for kingfish, bonito, barracuda, amberjack, and small sharks. When there is current, anchoring on wrecks will also get you your fair shots at mutton snapper. For those who find the heat of the day unbearable, then fishing after dark should be your choice. Anchoring up on the second or third reef will give you a shot at yellowtail snapper, mangrove snapper, mutton snapper, and a host of other bottom fish. Inshore, tarpon will be readily active after dark on a falling tide. For those who like to tangle will these silver beauties, it means that you'll have to adjust your fishing hours according to the tides. On most nights, losing a bit of sleep will be well worth it. Jay & Dana Perez, Steve Stock, and Greg Jacoski beat the heat and saw action with tarpon both along the beach at Government Cut and in the Bay (falling tide) during an evening tarpon trip. The Silver King in both locations ate live crabs and put on a great show for the anglers before they were released. The next morning, Frank, Sam, and Ashley Wallberg along with Joe Acquaviva got into lots of kingfish and bonito action during their 3/4 day trip. The action took place off the Twin Towers area in 130 - 180 feet. Live herring by far produced the most strikes with action coming on flatlines, mid-depth baits, and the bottom rod. By the end of the trip we had 5 kingfish and 3 bonito in the fish box and missed the hook up on several other fish. Alex Aru and three other friends did a late afternoon/evening trip. We fished off of the 87th Street area making four drifts before heading to Government Cut to tarpon fish. We had north current, blue water, and loads of grass to the point of being a nuisance. On two of the drifts as soon as we got to 190 feet, the bottom rod produced kingfish. At Government, we made one drift for tarpon before the group decided they wanted to call it an evening and take a tour up the east side of the Bay. Sue Cocking and Steve Waters fished a 3/4 day trip. We started by buying some pilchards and then catching herring along the beach south of Haulover Inlet. The herring were playing very hard to get and it took a while to catch about 18 baits. We put our first baits out in 198 feet just north of the Twin Towers. It took less than 5 minutes for the bottom rod to hook up and Sue caught a very nice 30# amberjack. Then the break away lead rod saw action with a bonito followed by a kingfish. Each drift produced action mainly on the bottom and break away lead outfit (70' down). We worked the same area and every time we got inside of 190 feet, we saw action on in to 150 feet. Final count was a 30# AJ, 3 kingfish in the 12 - 14 pound range, and 4 bonito, along with numerous chopped baits, pulled hooks, and cut offs. Mauricio Ruiz, Caroline Almoracid, Mark Perez, and Andre Ocampo fished a half day with plenty of action on a variety of fish. We worked the area between the Twin Towers and the Cuban Hole and saw all the action in the 130 - 180 foot range. Once again, the vast majority of the action came on the bottom rod and break away lead outfit. The variety of fish included kingfish, bonito, barracuda, amberjack, and shark. All the fish ate live herring that were caught at the crooked range marker outside of Government Cut. As you can see, the place for action and plenty of it is in the 130 - 190 foot range. The rest is up to you. Simply give me a call 305 965-9454 or email me nkostyo@bellsouth.net to set up your trip. Captain Dave 305 965-9454 Cell nkostyo@bellsouth.net
  16. So after he came to terms that I'm his real son he asked me what the hell I did with such a long rod(insert joke here). I took him to Damneck beach and casted a few Heavers. He was amazed to see lead fly like that. While casting I explained the different blanks and ratings, head wind, reading the beach, low and high tide, circle and J hooks, shock leader, and knots and stuff. After we packed it up he asked where I bought my rod and I told him I have them custom built. He then proceeded to point a gun at my head and made me drive over to Uncle Ronnie's so that he could drop some cash and have a 8-12 tangerine CTS built for me. I just want you all to know that I did try to resist. BTW I don't usually wear a hat.
  17. We planned on heading down to OI but when the forecast changed to 10 to 15 increasing to 15 to 20 kts and 2 to 4 at 5 seconds we decided to stay up here and look for Sea Bass and we found them on some near shore wrecks. I was literally amazed at the size of fish we connected with. We ended the day with 50 keepers and at least 15 were approaching the 4.5 pound mark and many others greater than 3 pounds threw back everything under 14”. Tommy picked up a nice fat 22” Flounder at the Triangles. Water was 67.4 degrees bait of choice was False Albacore and Squid, 8 oz. of lead and circle hooks. We hit several wrecks on the east side of the Triangles, we also hit the Powell and the Ricks. The Ricks is really holding some big fish now!!! Excellent back up plan. Thanks to Ashton, Tommy and JC!!!
  18. Went out with a buddy of mine (Capt John Walpole) to see if we could get a cobia out on the channel markers that lead in to the Charleston harbor. We didnt see them on the way out,,,,,but saw about 20 of them on the way back in. We hooked up on the fish at 12:15 and put him in the boat at 12:50. My buddy had to be back early, so one fish is all we had time for. Copyrighted.
  19. I'll be near the south end of Pawley's Island April 18-25. This will be my third year back and I'd like to make an effort to land some fish this time. First year up we did a little shore fishing with no luck, but this last year we managed to land a few dogfish from the surf behind our rental house. Caught them on cut mullet. We do a lot of crab trapping in the creek and I think I'd like to do some fishing creek side this year. Is that a decent plan? What should I use on the creek side for bait/tackle? It'd be nice if we could land something other than dogfish this year, but I'll take what I can get. I know it's still early for good fishing down there, but I figure it should be a little better since it's a month later than we used to go. Basically all I've done in the past as go down close to low tide and cast out as far as I can with some cut mullet and lead weight. It's difficult to tell when you have a hit though with the way the wind pulls at the line constantly. Any advice regarding bait/technique would be appreciated.
  20. ok, with the nps talking about switching to non lead fishing tackle and ammo are there any non lead sinkers on the market? do you think this will happen?
  21. Hello, everyone. I am new to this forum. I live in Charles County, MD (Waldorf), and will be traveling with family to Assateague Island in Sept 09. We intend to RV dry camp on the island. I have not surf fished for years, since I was a kid living on the west coast. I am more familiar with charter boat fishing. Any advice on how to catch well on AI. I will catch and keep Drum, Strippers, anything...really. My wife thinks that I am crazy planning this far out, but due to other hobbies, family, and work, I don't go fishing out much. For this surf fishing trip to AI, this is what I have for fishing gear right now, and other items: - 6-8 feet rods (3 each); - Spinner Reels (3 each); - 17 lb line on two of the reels; 7 lbs on one (mostly for freshwater); 25+ on one; - Assortment of lead weights and swivels; - 1/0 up to 3/0 hooks; No octopus hooks; - Artificial lures for saltwater is limited (mostly have freshwater stuff); - Cat litter plastic bucket (5 gallon); - ATV red wagon (bought for my son to carry around, but very good for rough terrain to carry); - Portable folding chairs with a little umbrella to attach - MD fishing license (saltwater); - Waders (mostly used for freshwater); - Net with handle about 3 feet long or so; I think that I need, but please validate, the following: - Spikes to hold the rods; - Steel leader or rig for Strippers; - Mullet for bait (don't have aerator); - Propane lantern for night fishing (that is legal right for surf fishing??) I have read about setting up a fish finder rig, and noticed that you can buy those also. What else?? Thanks. Lito
  22. For Immediate Release March 9, 2009 Contact: Jim Hutchinson, Jr. 888 564-6732 Recreational Fishing Alliance Challenges Summer Flounder Conservation Problem The 2008 summer flounder fishing season marked a bleak new era in the history of coastal fisheries management, going down in the books as the first year that the mortality associated with recreational discards of summer flounder equaled the overall harvest mortality. Based on the statistical numbers from the Marine Recreational Fishing Statistical Survey (MRFSS), nearly 50% of the total recreational mortality is attributed to regulatory discard, the highest level of discard mortality for this sector in the 27-year history of MRFSS. "Current management in the recreational summer flounder fishery has created an unnecessary conservation problem," said Jim Donofrio, Executive Director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA). "Recreational anglers caught an estimated 25 million summer flounder in 2008, with 2.38 million of those fish harvested and the remaining 23 million discarded due to burdensome regulations." Since the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) assumes that 10% of all recreational summer flounder discards die, Donofrio explains that managers must then assume that 2.3 million summer flounder were killed by recreational anglers in 2008 in order to comply with fishing regulations. Deemed by federal regulators as the best available science for tallying the recreational catch, MRFSS has also been called "fatally flawed" by fisheries managers due to its random collection methodology. However, the data is still used to set annual fishing quotas which results in increasing size limits and shrinking seasons. "Fishery managers are forced to work within mandated rebuilding deadlines that are arbitrary and not based on science," Donofrio explained in a recent letter to the Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council. "The result in many fisheries is wasteful, inefficient management and a less vibrant recreational fishing industry. Current and anticipated management of the recreational summer flounder fishery is clearly inconsistent with the spirit and intent of the Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act where conservation and access is the goal." Unlike other recreational fisheries including striped bass and bluefish, as well as highly migratory species like marlin and sailfish which boast a high level of voluntary discard by dedicated catch and release sportfishermen, there is no value to summer flounder discards. "An excessive level of discarding as we currently see in this fishery is a deterrent to participation and impedes conservation objectives contained within the fishery management plan," Donofrio explained. Donofrio points out that the RFA has long lobbied on behalf of this issue, saying that NMFS dismisses recreational summer flounder discards by claiming that the poundage is minimal due the small size of most discards. "Regardless of the pounds, a fish removed from a stock prior to spawning ultimately reduces the spawning potential of the stock and its ability to replenish itself," he said. "The current regime makes no sense and has been discussed within the recreational community for many years." The RFA charges that the best available science proves recreational anglers are landing fewer fish while at the same time discarding more of the smaller fish due to mandated size limits. In 1993, 6.49 million fish were landed, estimated to be 8.84 million pounds of fish. In 2007, only 3.39 million fish were landed, almost half of the amount landed in 1993. However, the estimated weight on those fish was 9.86 million pounds. "In terms of number of fish landed, recreational harvest is a fraction of the historical mean yet overfishing is linked to pounds landed," Donofrio said. "This cycle must be broken; it's ridiculous and simply defies common sense." Donofrio explained that lobbying efforts by members of the environmental business community during the last Magnuson reauthorization cycle left regional councils with a broken management tool which has ultimately lead to this serious conservation problem. "We lobbied to get this flexibility language included in the Magnuson Act to help protect our coastal fisheries, but too many conservation groups erroneously claimed we were more interested in protecting the fishermen as opposed to the fish," he said. "RFA will continue to take the lead to protect the whole fishery, fish and the fishermen alike."
  23. Hey guys and gals, I know I have not written in a while but been very busy lately, anyway if there is anyone out there that needs help with a vehicle issue drop me a line, I will be glad to help, I can do most jobs or repairs and if I cannot I would gladly let you know right away. I am a lead aircraft mechanic by trade and a automobile tech by hobby, I enjoy working on vehicles and have been doing so for over, 15 years now. Before I became an aircraft mechanic I was a ford ASE certified mechanic. I have obd2 scanning equipment to tell you what the problem is and to clear codes, or if you have any questions you might need help answering drop me a line, I might not have a solid answer but will help you find it if I dont. Thanks again, and keep them vehicles runnin strong for the up coming fishin season.
  24. I have been doing a mixed bag of fishing out in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:place>Biscayne Bay</st1:place> lately and was able to focus on one of my favorite fish today, bonefish. The outlook looked so good with nice stable weather patterns, nice tides and clear skies the expectation was to put several bonefish in the boat for sure. The bonefish had other ideas though. The bone fishing was tough today inspite of the chamber of commerce weather. The morning fish were not to be found but the afternoon got into gear which allowed us to have numerous shots at nice schools of spooky bones. We went 1 for 2 and had numerous shots at may more fish including schools of solid double digit fish, yes the kind you get weak at the knees over. Inspite of the clear skies, the sun angle in the winter is lower than usual which means your visibility is not as good as say in the summer and today was one example where you have to work through it as best you can. Also, when running into spooky bones try doing things differently (I.E. longer casts, lead the fish more, remove split shots, Etc…) until you get one to commit. Well, the weather is here and so are the bones so get out there and make that drag sing. If you’re in town or need some pointers give me a call and let set up a trip. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p> <st1:place><st1:City>Capt.</st1:City> <st1:State>Mo</st1:State></st1:place> Estevez New Dawn Charters 305-495-7397