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Found 1022 results

  1. Ok with all the talk this year of getting a big shark and with all the new to shark fishing anglers I felt that a thread of general shark fishing tactics and responsibilities should be posted. In my opinion if you want to catch a shark but have never done it ask us here on atlantic anglers for someone to join you to "show the ropes". Better to have experience with you the first time you hook up to that big one with your adrenaline pumping and nerves shot. The other thing is to know where to set up and keep your targeted game on the hush side of things. Im not saying to hide the fact that your sharkin just dont tell everyone you run into on what your going after. We don't need any more attention to what we are fishin for than what is already being made. Case in point, a fellow shark angler has had great success sharkin up north this year and has posted pictures all over the place. Because of this, this northern state will now be putting in regulations on yaking out baits for quote unquote "big game". Shark fishing is not illegal,but it is walking a fine line. A lot of the sharks being caught are on the near threatened or threatened species list. If the wrong person catches a shark being mishandled things can get ugly real quick. Now back to location, I emphasized this because I don't think it would be a wise idea to go down to lets say ocean city and set up shop next to dozens of swimmers looking to catch a toothy critter. I know they are their anyway but to city officials you attracted them to that spot, also using bait attracts them their not because the shark just happens to be their. I am not trying to complain just want for everyone to be able to enjoy catching these beautiful species for many more years, and want to ensure everyone fishing for them uses good common sense so no one gets hurt including the shark. give some feedback and lets see what everyone else has to say.
  2. Got a question about Rocks this happened to a friend of mine and me the same night. My Buddy had 2 nice rocks that he had caught and had on ice for 2 days I had 2 nice rocks that I had caught and had on ice for less than 20 hours we both fillet them and he cooked his one way and me another (used a crab cake res. spread it out on top of the fish and broiled them). Took em out of the oven and they looked a tad bit over cooked but nothing tooo bad. Man o man took one bite of them and the fishy taste was sooo bad and over powering that I couldn't eat another bight. Felt bad about that and put them down for the dog to eat and she couldn't even finish them. Called my buddy up the next day and he said his fish had a real bad fishy taste to them as well. When I cleaned the fish they looked good and I even cut out the dark meat on the fillet. Not sure what went wrong but was wondering if anyone has had this happen to them and what I could do in the future to make sure this doesn't happen again...Tanks
  3. There are more helpful online resources for fishing and boating than ever before. Novice or seasoned angler, there is something for everyone. From new techniques and products to the latest weather information, the sites below promise to make your fishing more enjoyable.
  4. Hello all, I have been making my hook leaders on my fish finders as short as possible. Around 2-3". I have seen some that have been using a 8-12" hook leader on their fish finders. I always thought the shorter the better for casting distance but there has to be some reason for the longer leaders. Is it to keep the hook as far away from the sinker as possible? Of course casting distance is always an issue but how much is it effected with the longer leader? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Also, how imprtant is it for the hook leader to be as straight as possible? When i am tying the leader to the swivel with a uni it always sems to get a little kinked. Thanks for your help!
  5. Of all the time I've spent fishing the bay i have never really targeted flounder. Ive caught plenty on peeler fishing for greys. What is everyone's favorite jig or lure or rig for catching them? Thanks in advance for the insite.
  6. I have been working on my new ride and on this post for a while. I am excited and looking forward to finishing. Here is the link Jet Ski Brian
  7. Hey guys, thanks a lot for the info on this forum. I'm buddies with mwheatley, who posted here before our last trip two weeks ago. The info you guys have shared with us has proved to be a big help. Our first trip was a big success. Our first time out we caught two nice sharks, the largest being a 6 1/2 foot sand tiger. We went out again to <acronym title="Assateague Island"><acronym title="Assateague Island">AI</acronym></acronym> this last weekend Friday night/Saturday morning, a few miles down from our spot two weeks ago. This time we got skunked (except for a tiny 18 incher). If you don't mind, I've got a few questions. When we went two weeks ago there was no moon and the beach was full of sand fleas and crabs. They were everywhere. I can't help but think fish had come in to feed on these critters, and other fish came in to feed on those fish, etc., and sharks were more active. This time, it was nearly a full moon so there was plenty of light and no crabs/sand fleas. Plus there were no bigger sharks caught. (The moon did set about 4:00 am, and the crabs did come out then, and that's when we caught our small 18 incher.) So my first question is, have you guys seen any correlation between lunar cycles and shark catches (i.e., it's better with no moon, worse at full moon)? Or are other factors more significant, i.e. wind direction and water temp, more significant than the lunar cycle. (Last time we went (July 16/17), I didn't record the air or water temp, but there was a definite east wind, and the air seemed a bit cooler. This time, the wind was from the south-southwest, and it seemed generally warmer.) Second question is we're halving our bunker, casting out 1/2 pieces (5-6 inch head and tail). We did the same last time and caught some nice sharks with it. But if we were to cut the bunker into thirds, we could cast it further out. So there's trade offs with small bait (less blood trail, harder for sharks to find) cast out further or larger bait (more blood trail, easier to find) cast out not nearly as far. Are you guys halving your bunker or are you cutting it into smaller pieces and getting it further? What do you think yields more hits? Thanks in advance for the info. You guys have been a big help.
  8. I departed Messick Boat Ramp in Poquoson Virginia at 0600 hrs and headed 15 miles across the Bay to the Fourth Island of the CBBT. It was almost flat so I was able to easily average 45 mph. I bottom fished around the piles with big live minnow and caught and threw back two flounder that were around 17". I then tried for a little while at the spine of the rocks around the island with no luck. Around 1000 the tide died out and I could see lots of spadefish around the piles, so even though I did not plan on diving today the decent visibilty tempted me. I got geared up and dove around several piles and speared my 4 spades. After that I went back to flounder fishing, this time I was off of the Third Island. I saw several decent flounder caught but I only managed one more throw back and a couple of Oyster Toads. I had some plans this afternoon so headed back around 1330 hrs. I covered 40 miles and burned 10.5 gallons. I am glad I have a big jet ski with plenty of storage. I took a couple of pictures of just some of the gear I bring with me on a typical day. Some fishing, diving, safety and paperwork.
  9. A few things to consider before shark fishing By Mark Sampson OCEAN CITY -- I applaud those who pursue sharks from the beach. I'm sorry that I don't have the time during the summer months to do so myself. But the more photos I see of sharks taken from the beach, the more concerned I get about the well-being of the sharks that are caught and released. Sandbars, duskies and sand tigers are the larger sharks most likely to be landed by local surf anglers, since they are also three species of sharks that may not legally be retained at any time by recreational anglers, in most cases when a large shark is taken from a Delmarva beach it must be released. As the sport grows, too many anglers are jumping into it without the knowledge or skills needed to ethically deal with such large animals. Anglers who choose to mess with 100- to 200-pound sharks have better have their act together or the results might not fare well for fish or fisherman. Obviously there are safety issues for those handling the sharks, and one bad move could result in serious injuries. These ain't stripers, boys! For now I'll just suggest that fishermen keep their limbs out of the pointy end of their catch. I see too many photos of gut-hooked sharks and sharks that have been dragged too far from the water's edge. Anglers must keep in mind that just because they see a shark swim away after release, that it doesn't mean it's OK. Sharks can be so stressed out or damaged by improper handling. That's not a good outcome for the three species so often caught in the surf that are on the Prohibited Species List because their populations are so low. Do not pull sharks up onto the dry sand for photos or any other reason. Dragging a large shark by its tail can cause injuries to its vertebrae and other internal parts. During the day, the temperature away from the wet zone of the beach is going to be a lot warmer, and warm, dry air does a shark's skin no good. Before a shark is even hooked anglers should have a plan ready for a quick release. Cameras, tags, measuring devices and any other tools should be ready and available so there's no fumbling around at the last minute. Anglers should also forget about calling in friends or family to "come down to the beach and see what I caught!" There's no time for that. Get the shark in from the surf just far enough that it can be safely handled, snap a few photos and get it back to its home ASAP. In many of the photos I've seen of sharks on the beach, it's clear that the shark was gut-hooked. While gut-hooking does not necessary mean a death sentence for every fish, it certainly increases the chance for mortality. If a hook impaled in the gut isn't bad enough, imagine the internal damage to a shark that's done if the animal is dragged partially up the beach by the leader. The hooks would likely tear the stomach and impale other organs inside the animal. I know a lot of beach fishermen are wisely using circle hooks, but some are still doing things the old way and using big double hook rigs with J-hooks. Double J-hook rigs kill sharks. They should never be used. I know a lot of sharkers like to use large baits such as rays, and feel that two hooks are needed to keep the bait properly attached to the rig. That problem can be overcome with a little creative rigging and sometimes the use of cable ties or rigging wire. Single, non-offset circle hooks -- I suggest the Mustad 39960D -- are the only way to go for shark fishing from beach or boat. Still, circle hooks still have a 5-10 percent chance of gut-hooking. There's something about the way a shark's throat closes-up that too often traps even a circle hook and allows it to embed itself inside the shark rather than in the jaw as it was designed to do. Observing this, we began experimented with different rigs and hooks that would help ensure that sharks would be hooked in the jaw every time. What we came up with is what we call a blocker rig, a length of plastic pipe mounted perpendicular to the leader a specific distance from the hook. The pipe prevents or "blocks" the fish from swallowing the bait. We've documented an almost 100 percent success rate of preventing gut hooking since we started using these rigs in 2008. This season we're trying to determine if the blocker-rig is as effective at getting bites as a standard nonblocker rig. We've been fishing both type of rigs side-by-side and recording the results of every bite. So far our records indicate almost a perfect 50-50 split, indicating that the sharks are not shying away from the awkward looking rig. I didn't really plan on promoting this rig until we'd finished tweaking it out a bit more, but the aforementioned evidence of so many sharks being gut hooked from the beach has prompted me to do so now. I'm certain it has saved the lives of a lot of sharks that would otherwise have eventually died after being gut-hooked. Blocker rigs are easy to make using PVC or any other type of plastic pipe. For small sharks we use an 8-inch length of plastic tubing, drill a hole through its mid-section and run our wire leader through the hole. Using crimps or twisted wire, the pipe is fastened to the leader 4 inches above the eye of the hook; it can rotate but not slide up or down on the leader. When we expect larger sharks such as makos, blues, tigers, or sand tigers we'll use 14-inch lengths of half-inch PVC mounted 7 inches above the eye of the hook. For really large sharks such as big tigers we increased the length of the pipe to 24 inches since they have such wide mouths. The measurement from the eye of the hook to the pipe is important because if it's too long, the hook can still reach the shark's throat. Anyone who wishes to try making blocker rigs of their own are welcome to call me in the evening for more details at 410-213-2442 or e-mail me at modernsharking@ gmail.com. Source - A few things to consider before shark fishing | delmarvanow.com | The Daily Times
  10. It was a great day yesterday, the weather was perfect and the fish were plentiful. I took Chad Baniowski of Williamsburg Virginia out to the Chesapeake Light Tower. Chad is a Chef at Berrets Seafood Resturant in Historic Williamsburg so I am looking forward to getting some new recipes for ways to cook Spades from him. I had been telling him all about Spadefish and spear fishing and he was eager to give it a try. We departed Rudee Inlet around 0930 and went straight to the tower, it was nice, there was not another boat in sight so we had the tower to ourselves. The current was ripping but the visibility was decent at about 15-20 feet. There were tons of spade fish and we saw quite a few Amberjack as well. Chad speared his first spadefish and we were able to get our limit of 8 after a good workout of fighting the strong current and swells. Chad also tried some jigging but could not get one of the Jacks to bite, I am sure a live bait would have done the trick. About the time we were leaving two other jet skis showed up to try and catch some fish (I may be starting a jet ski trend). We were back at the ramp and on the road around 1530, just in time for rush hour traffic. Ha. The Chesapeake Light Tower is about 16 miiles off shore from Virginia Beach. I carry a Spot GPS Tracker with me here is the link to one of my "Spots" showing the Lat/Long of the tower. http://fms.ws/3BiSy/36.90466/\-75.71265 It was another great day, here are some of the pictures I took while out.
  11. I have been using Power Pro at Assateague and someone there suggested using Spiderwire Ultracast braid as it casts further and is easier to tie knots with. Would appreciate comments from anyone who has experience using both braids. Josh
  12. Hey guys, new to the site, semi-new to surf fishing! I mainly fish AI and wanted some input on my current rod/reel setups, conventionally i currently have: Diawa SL30 Penn 525mag Penn 12' stick (forget the model) Diawa 10' Emcast plus How would you guys match these up, diawa with diawa or would you mix them. Also, my casting distance on these conventionals is certainly not what it should be, what would you recommend as the best casting method for these as a beginner? I've watched many videos, i've tried different methods, I have a huge fear of the birds nest, What should i do?????? Thanks in advance!
  13. Yesterday my wife Cindy and I along with my brother John and his wife Renee’ met with my Congressional Representative, Congressman Rob Wittman of Americas first Congressional District for lunch and a tour of the Capital. This came about by way of a Duck’s Unlimited fundraiser a few months ago. Congressman Wittman was kind enough to donate this personalized tour and I was lucky enough to win the bid! We met at his office in the Longworth building around noon and I gave him a framed photo I had taken of New Point Comfort Light recently. From there we went to the Capital Hill Club for a great lunch. We had a good discussion about the Chesapeake Bay regarding the menhaden fishery and oyster aquaculture. Rob Wittman is also an avid angler and an advocate for the Bay so of course I had a good time talking with him. Next he took us to the Capital where we were fortunate to see a vote in progress. There were many other Congressmen present and it was impressive to see it all in action. Afterward we walked to the Rotunda where Congressman Wittman gave us a great lesson in history, art and architecture. All told we spent over two hours together. It was an experience we will not soon forget. Gordon Neal, the Congressman’s Staff Assistant, gave us an extended tour of the rest of the Capital building. Later in the day the four of us walked the Mall area. My wife’s father is a World War Two Veteran and my father was in Korea and Vietnam so we all wanted to see those memorial sites. Here are some of the pictures I took.
  14. My wife said she wanted to find Flipper, so on a Dolpin Quest we went. We left our house in Poquoson on the jet ski and ran around the mouth of the Poquoson River and York River. Did not see any so we went over to New Point Comfort Light for a bit. Saw a lot of Pelicans and an Oyster Catcher. On the way back, around the Mouth of Mobjack Bay we found a big group of dolphin, they were very playful and hanging around the ski. Our Quest was complete! Here are a couple of pictures from today
  15. well summer fishin has started early this year with the shark arriving a few weeks early. spot and kings in the surf and a few striper in the inlet. feel free to post if you go out catch or no catch and have a safe and happy 4th of july.
  16. Hey guys! Me and my fiance will be down for the week of the 17th - 24th! Just wanted to see if anyone will be on the beach? Hopefully we will finally get down and meet everyone!!!!! We got all the rods packed and picking two more Ticas up when I get down! Only bad thing is no 4x4 permit for this year....as of yet!!!!! But anyway just wanted to see who all will be on the beach for the week. I am not sure if we will have internet connection but please feel free to call me or e-mail me! I am looking forward to hearing from you guys!!! hopefully we can wet a line together! Seya on the beach!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Cell - 717.991.3882 E-mail - Riseagainstus818@verizon.net
  17. The next meeting of the Bull Island Anglers Club will be Monday July 26th at 7pm. The meeting will be held at Trinity United Methodist Church in Poquoson, Va. The address is 1294 Poquoson, Ave. The meeting is free and open to the public. Our topic this month will be sheepshead and triggerfish. These fish can often be caught together on offshore wrecks or banging pilings at the bridge tunnel and are available most of the summer months. Everything one needs to know from rod and reel selection to how to hook the bait for optimum hook set will be discussed. So come on down and pick up a few tips on sheepshead and triggerfish. We will also be discussing the upcoming Flat and Furious Flounder tournament that we are helping promote and run. This tournament has been great the last few years and the prize money is guaranteed, so tell a friend or two to enter the tournament. $1000 for 1st place. Hope to see ya'll there.
  18. I had a friend i grew up with, Kevin, in town this weekend so i took him and the brother in law out for some spades at the CBBT. Once again the morning started off with some rough water but it laid out pretty nicely by the middle of the day. We tried my favorite spot with no luck which was a first. Then we moved around to the other side of the 4th. Within 10 minutes we had our first spade of the day. We ended up with 7 spades all a ranging from 4-5lbs. Which were larger than the previous week. We headed back to the ramp at wise piont around 1 and had another great day on the bay.
  19. So I have a 12' cabelas salt striker rod, rated 3-8oz (total bull, more like, 2-5, maybe 6) that has lost the rings out of the 3rd and 5th eyes from the top. I stuck the 5th back in, but I know I'm on borrowed time. I bought it in the bargin cave at a cabelas retail store for $50. My question is this: I've had several quotes of replacing the eyes for $9-11 an eye + cost of parts. I'm thinking of just replacing all the eyes with something higher quality. Total cost would then therefore be around $90 give or take. Making the rod more expensive than it cost new ($140 new rod vs. $120 retail). What do you think? Should I just save the $90 and save up for another rod? I really like the action and weight of the rod...but I just got a tsunami air wave 8' lure rod for the surf and I can see where one might say just scrap the thing and get something better. Thanks! Jerry
  20. Just wanted to say Happy 4th of July everyone. Have a great time and be safe.
  21. Well got back from oc and had a great time met alot of people turned 15 and im down there i decided well i dont love my rod and reel. So thought i might as you guys. I would like a rod that can cast alot of weight like 8+oz. and im lookin for a reel that will hold like 300 yards of 20lb test. It can be casting or spinning and i would like the rod and reel to be under $250. Oh and a 2 peice rod is neccesary because i obviously travel so thanks. This is question number 1 after the 2010 oc trip.
  22. I departed my house in Poquoson Virginia on my Grady around 1300 hrs yesterday and went straight to York Spit Light. I anchored up and chummed for 4 hours in about 19 foot of water. No Cobia for me today but I did get a little action from the blue fish and little dog fish that kept nibbling away at my eels. I did hear a couple of other boats caught some.
  23. Chinese mitten crabs, first reported in the Chesapeake Bay, are more widespread than initially thought. Four crabs have now been caught in Delaware Bay during the last week of May 2007, and may occur in other waters of the U.S. east coast. The "furry-looking" claws distinguish the Chinese mitten crab from native crabs. This Chinese mitten crab was caught by a waterman fishing for Blue crabs in the Upper Chesapeake Bay on May 18. (Credit: Greg Ruiz, Smithsonian) In total, seven adult male mitten crabs have been documented from the two bays since 2005. Prior to this, the potentially invasive species had never been recorded from coastal waters of the eastern United States. The mitten crab is native to eastern Asia and has already invaded Europe and the western United States, where it has established reproductive populations. The crab occurs in both freshwater and saltwater. Young crabs spend their lives in freshwater and migrate to saltwater estuaries for reproduction. Named for the unusual thick fur-like coating on its claws, the mitten crab looks very different than native crabs and is easily recognized. It is listed as injurious wildlife under the Federal Lacey Act, due to its potential to cause ecological and economic damage. "We don't know the present status of this crab along the eastern U.S. coast" said Gregory Ruiz, senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. "At the moment, it is not clear whether these crabs are reproducing or established in the Mid-Atlantic region, or whether the captured crabs are just a few individuals that originated elsewhere." These crabs may have arrived in the ballast water of ships or through live trade. A Mitten Crab Network has been established to examine the abundance, distribution, and reproductive status of crabs in Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay and other estuaries along the eastern United States. The initial partnership between the Smithsonian lab, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, is now being expanded to include resource managers, commercial fishermen, research organizations and citizens along the east coast. Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by Smithsonian.
  24. I know bluefishing this year is hit or miss but are there any blues hangin out in the Inlet?? Maybe on incoming tide.??? 7 Days today so im so exited. We will start packing on monday after father's day and hope to see some of you guys down there!! Happpy Fishing!!
  25. The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament Board of Directors has unanimously determined that they have no choice but to disqualify the 883-pound blue marlin caught on June 14, 2010. It cost the crew of the boat Citation a cash prize of $912,000. After interviewing members of the crew of the fishingvessel “Citation," review of the Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament rules, consulting the division of Marine Fisheries as well as the North Carolina Attorney General’s office, the Board agreed there had been a violation of tournament rules but the violation did not involve “dishonesty” or “cheating” on the part of the owners or angler of the “Citation." The rule violation involves the “mate” not having a Coastal Recreational Fishing License, which is required by North Carolina law and by the Tournament. Participants and crew were reminded of the license requirement at the Captains meeting prior to the Tournament. The mate engaged in fishing activities without a valid license and later obtained a license at 5:51 pm while heading to the weigh station. The fish was boated at 3:16 pm. "It is an unfortunate situation for the crew of 'Citation' as well as the Tournament itself but for the integrity of the Tournament, Big Rock had no choice but to enforce the rules and disqualify the fish," the Board said in a press release Tuesday. Because of this disqualification, The Big Rock Board of Directors declare Carnivore the winner with their 528.3-pound blue marlin and in second place, Wet-N-Wild with a 460-pound blue marlin. Carnivore's win earns the crew a payout of $999,453. Wet-N-Wild pockets $275,322 Big Rock's record-breaking marlin catch disqualified - WRALSportsFan.com