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Found 1243 results

  1. Hat's off to the ECO's: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Denise M. Sheehan today announced the charging of a Shirley man with multiple violations of the Environmental Conservation Law after Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) observed the individual allegedly possessing 268 blackfish over the state’s fishing limit. "This arrest once again demonstrates the work that our ECOs do each day to protect the public, and our natural resources," Commissioner Sheehan said. "ECOs are tireless in their pursuit of violators of the State’s Environmental Conservation laws." ECOs observed Arthur C. Reilly, 46, of 39 Cypress Lane, Shirley as he returned to Senix Marina, Center Moriches aboard his commercial fishing vessel "Flora-Jo." Upon docking his vessel officers observed him offloading live blackfish into three holding pens that were in the water at the boat slip. In total, Mr. Reilly had 293 live blackfish, 268 over the state limit, and also had five striped bass and fillets of three other striped bass in a cooler on the vessel. The state’s striped bass season ended on December 15. After counting the blackfish, 268 live blackfish were released. Mr. Reilly was charged with possession of striped bass out of season and possession of blackfish in excess of the limit, all violations, with additional charges pending. In addition to the work done by Long Island area ECOs to investigate marine fishing violations, the DEC also formed a Marine Enforcement Unit in June 2005 under Commissioner Sheehan’s leadership. The MEU is specifically responsible for protecting the State's marine resources by enforcing State and Federal laws and regulations concerning habitat preservation and the recreational and commercial harvesting of fish, shellfish, and crustaceans. ECOs in the unit are assigned to the lower Hudson Valley, New York City and Long Island. The MEU includes 10 officers and an investigator.
  2. I had the bug; so I decided to give SPSP a try this morning. Plus I had a new combo I wanted to try out. Arrived around 6am in the middle of a summer shower (Damn!, forgot my rainsuit) but decided to setup at the POINT. Two rods, dozens of hit by fish that mast have been 1inch long.. No Fish, and after the 8th shower I decided to call it quits. The Rain was actually refreshing, but with no fish being caughs the eggs and bacon started calling me.. http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4240-1.jpg[/img]"] http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4242-1.jpg[/img]"] http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4241-1.jpg[/img]"]
  3. Went to <acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island">RI</acronym></acronym></acronym> on our little 3 day family trip we do every year.Camped at Burlingame.Got there Thursday and set up camp.Friday morning we launched out of the Charlestown Breachway and headed to Block Island.The sky was overcast I sea was clam and like glas.I have never seen it like that.We have wanted to head out there for a few years.We have got fish off Nebraska Shoal,but,the guy in the bait shop kept telling up to go to the block.We got there and there was 50 boats or so fishing the self.I dropped a Diamond jig and Bam,I got a 6 lb Blue.We hammered fish till noon BIG blues Keeper Stripers (no monsters) some Dogfish and a Skate or two. We headed over to Fisherman's Point around 1 pm.Met the family,had lunch.Then we loaded the boat with our 2 boys and all the Scuba gear.Took them out to the Shoal.It was there first open dive in the ocean.We sat on the boat while they we down.It sucked sitting there ,but,I was on the water and .oh well.They came up after 20 mins or so ,telling us of the HUGE Stripes and Blues they saw and an abundance of other sea life.Pretty cool.Just as they came up ,the sky got dark.We headed in and half way back we got HAMMERED! We got to the boat ramp,it was low tide.I jumped off the boat bare foot,stepped on the ramp.Next thing I knew I was getting picked up off the concrete ramp.I went down hard.Cut up my hand ,and I'm hurting still. We loaded up and head to Galilee got 6 lbs of Steamers and headed back to camp/I washed the Steamers and let them sit in cornmeal till the next day. Saturday we headed out in the am again .After a night of soaking thunder storms.The sea was 2-3 ' waves.We headed to Block Island again.Rough LONG ride out there.We fished the same spots.About 70 boats out there.We didn't get any Stripers but,I got a PB Blue fish at 15 lbs!What a fight!The sea calmed down around 10 and so did the fishing.We hung till noon and went back to camp.The boys picked up 6 1 1/2 -2 lbs Lobsters.We went back to camp and had a seafood feast fit for a King.Plus Pork chops, baked potatos, best corn on the cob I have had so far this season, we got at a farm stand by Matunik exit off rt 1..Just as we finished eating.the sky started to darken.We had checked the weather for last night and Sunday.It said rain.So ,we packed up and headed home.Just as we left the sky opened up again.
  4. I have some family in town this week so i offered to take my uncle and cousins fishing. We headed out of wise point around 9am and found a nice smooth ride to the highrise. With my uncle, cousin Jim and the wife on board we started by drifting for flounder. Within minutes we had our first flounder on board caught by my wife. It was her first flounder ever but it came up an inch short. I tried around the piles for spades but only had a few nibbles and didnt even see any in the water. On one drift past the piles my uncle caught a nice triggerfish and a few minuts later i had one as well. This was my first trigger. He caught his on squid and mine was caught on shrimp. We continued to drift around hoping for that keeper flounder but after 9 caught and all thrown back we diecided to go to the 4th island. It didnt take long and we started to catch fish. Still no keepers though. Tried for spades at the 4th as well with no luck. We headed back to the highrise and caught a few more throw back flounder and headed in around 4. We ended the day with 12 flounder, all within an inch of legal size, countless huge oystertoads, black sea bass, 2 triggers around 4 lbs, and of course a ray. We caught fish constantly all day and had a great time. The best flounder bait seemed to be minnow/squid combo (best oyster toad bait too!!). I did catch one on a "lead head" with a twister tail tipped with squid while jigging across the bottom. Thanks to everyone that replied to my flounder rig question. We had a great time cating them. Maybe next time we can keep a few.
  5. Please help our local Assateague National Park win $100,000 grant from Coca-Cola through the National Park Foundation, you can vote as many times as you like. all votes must be in by aug 31,2010. Coca-Cola in the Community - Coke Community Involvement | Coca-Cola. please help support our island we love so near and dear. thank you.
  6. A few things to consider before shark fishing By Mark Sampson OCEAN CITY -- I applaud those who pursue sharks from the beach. I'm sorry that I don't have the time during the summer months to do so myself. But the more photos I see of sharks taken from the beach, the more concerned I get about the well-being of the sharks that are caught and released. Sandbars, duskies and sand tigers are the larger sharks most likely to be landed by local surf anglers, since they are also three species of sharks that may not legally be retained at any time by recreational anglers, in most cases when a large shark is taken from a Delmarva beach it must be released. As the sport grows, too many anglers are jumping into it without the knowledge or skills needed to ethically deal with such large animals. Anglers who choose to mess with 100- to 200-pound sharks have better have their act together or the results might not fare well for fish or fisherman. Obviously there are safety issues for those handling the sharks, and one bad move could result in serious injuries. These ain't stripers, boys! For now I'll just suggest that fishermen keep their limbs out of the pointy end of their catch. I see too many photos of gut-hooked sharks and sharks that have been dragged too far from the water's edge. Anglers must keep in mind that just because they see a shark swim away after release, that it doesn't mean it's OK. Sharks can be so stressed out or damaged by improper handling. That's not a good outcome for the three species so often caught in the surf that are on the Prohibited Species List because their populations are so low. Do not pull sharks up onto the dry sand for photos or any other reason. Dragging a large shark by its tail can cause injuries to its vertebrae and other internal parts. During the day, the temperature away from the wet zone of the beach is going to be a lot warmer, and warm, dry air does a shark's skin no good. Before a shark is even hooked anglers should have a plan ready for a quick release. Cameras, tags, measuring devices and any other tools should be ready and available so there's no fumbling around at the last minute. Anglers should also forget about calling in friends or family to "come down to the beach and see what I caught!" There's no time for that. Get the shark in from the surf just far enough that it can be safely handled, snap a few photos and get it back to its home ASAP. In many of the photos I've seen of sharks on the beach, it's clear that the shark was gut-hooked. While gut-hooking does not necessary mean a death sentence for every fish, it certainly increases the chance for mortality. If a hook impaled in the gut isn't bad enough, imagine the internal damage to a shark that's done if the animal is dragged partially up the beach by the leader. The hooks would likely tear the stomach and impale other organs inside the animal. I know a lot of beach fishermen are wisely using circle hooks, but some are still doing things the old way and using big double hook rigs with J-hooks. Double J-hook rigs kill sharks. They should never be used. I know a lot of sharkers like to use large baits such as rays, and feel that two hooks are needed to keep the bait properly attached to the rig. That problem can be overcome with a little creative rigging and sometimes the use of cable ties or rigging wire. Single, non-offset circle hooks -- I suggest the Mustad 39960D -- are the only way to go for shark fishing from beach or boat. Still, circle hooks still have a 5-10 percent chance of gut-hooking. There's something about the way a shark's throat closes-up that too often traps even a circle hook and allows it to embed itself inside the shark rather than in the jaw as it was designed to do. Observing this, we began experimented with different rigs and hooks that would help ensure that sharks would be hooked in the jaw every time. What we came up with is what we call a blocker rig, a length of plastic pipe mounted perpendicular to the leader a specific distance from the hook. The pipe prevents or "blocks" the fish from swallowing the bait. We've documented an almost 100 percent success rate of preventing gut hooking since we started using these rigs in 2008. This season we're trying to determine if the blocker-rig is as effective at getting bites as a standard nonblocker rig. We've been fishing both type of rigs side-by-side and recording the results of every bite. So far our records indicate almost a perfect 50-50 split, indicating that the sharks are not shying away from the awkward looking rig. I didn't really plan on promoting this rig until we'd finished tweaking it out a bit more, but the aforementioned evidence of so many sharks being gut hooked from the beach has prompted me to do so now. I'm certain it has saved the lives of a lot of sharks that would otherwise have eventually died after being gut-hooked. Blocker rigs are easy to make using PVC or any other type of plastic pipe. For small sharks we use an 8-inch length of plastic tubing, drill a hole through its mid-section and run our wire leader through the hole. Using crimps or twisted wire, the pipe is fastened to the leader 4 inches above the eye of the hook; it can rotate but not slide up or down on the leader. When we expect larger sharks such as makos, blues, tigers, or sand tigers we'll use 14-inch lengths of half-inch PVC mounted 7 inches above the eye of the hook. For really large sharks such as big tigers we increased the length of the pipe to 24 inches since they have such wide mouths. The measurement from the eye of the hook to the pipe is important because if it's too long, the hook can still reach the shark's throat. Anyone who wishes to try making blocker rigs of their own are welcome to call me in the evening for more details at 410-213-2442 or e-mail me at modernsharking@ gmail.com. Source - A few things to consider before shark fishing | delmarvanow.com | The Daily Times
  7. I'll be working the under armour booth this week. Stop by if you can. Ben
  8. Hey guys...I am about to go on a another trip, but I took a couple people out last night and we caught something amazing. By far my most memorable fish catch of all time. Here is a teaser, a full report will come tomorrow when I have gotten some rest!: Anyone want to guess what this is? Ben
  9. Yesterday I had the pleasure of taking my sister Allison, Rachael, my 13 year old niece and Christopher, my 27 year old nephew spear fishing. This was Allison and Rachael’s first time spearing. We all met at my house in Poquoson and towed the skis to Virginia Beach. We departed Rudee Inlet around 0930 hours and went 16 miles offshore to the Chesapeake Light Tower. The sea conditions were great all day and we averaged about 25 mph going and 35-40 mph coming back. The water visibility was fair at about 20 feet and the spadefish were plentiful. Rachael is a quick learner and after I showed her how to get it done by spearing a couple, she had no problem shooting a couple her self. There was plenty of life out at the tower and we saw some amberjack, barracuda, triggerfish and a lot of bait fish. My sister did not want her daughter to show her up so she also got in on the action and shot her first ever as well. Christopher and I finished up getting our limits and we had our coolers full of 4 fish per person, 16 fish in all, before heading back at 1530. I had a great time with my family and was proud at how well my niece handled herself on the ski and in the water. We covered about thirty four miles and each ski burned about nine gallons. Another great day! Here are some of the pictures from our trip.
  10. Fish Report 8/1/10 Sea Bass Continue A Taste of Fluke How Goes the Watching? Hi All, Some outstanding fishing this week. Odd for heart of summer really. Take your luck where you find it I suppose. It certainly wasn't all gravy. As most clients were reeling in sea bass Wednesday, Flounder George & I twitched strips for fluke. Caught the heck out of 'em too. Tagged or just thrown back; He & I had no keepers in close to 40 fish. Not a back-bay trip, this was ocean fishing not quite 30 miles from the inlet. My mates both fished -on my direct order- for a short while. They of course both quickly caught a keeper and --being clear-thinking young men-- wisely and generously decided to allow George & Captain their fish-fry. Young Matt too: He hung a strip of cut-bait on his bottom hook and pushed aside all comers at the fish pool weigh-in, his six pound flattie easily trumping some very nice bass. Saturday we had a pleasant, sustained bite on sea bass with no flounder at all. Several mahi however were invited to dinner, one of which ran a solid 50 yards off Ralph's spinner before being worked back to the gaff. ..some clients had to go out to dinner this week too: bitter with the sweet. I really think fluke will bust loose soon, but I've been maintaining that position for some while.. I'm certain that we'll go fishing, not sure what we'll bring home. A new picture committed to personal memory: Chum overboard, two kites up, 4 baits out. With sea bass coming over the rail a Bruiser comes sliding in, investigating. Couldn't tell species. Big. Calorically unimpressive, our baits were investigated and left alone. This shark wanted at least a whole bluefish and perhaps would have preferred partaking of whale carcass.. Neat stuff.... Not so neat but of our time: It defies reason that we catch very respectable fish such as 18 inch flounder and 12 inch sea bass --fish that practically have Purdue Pop-Up baking timers built-in, yet have to throw them all back. MRFSS recreational catch estimate data is destroying constituents' good will toward management. It really is very poor recreational catch estimate data, the MRFSS data, that is, in many ways, strangling the rec-fish industry. Years ahead of management; in 1992 I was the first to put a 9 inch size limit on sea bass. At times a very ugly, heated effort; Resistance was intense. But the benefits were soon plain to see. We are no longer restoring with our releases; We are, instead, squandering our restoration. Strict adherence to data sets easily satired is where we lost sight of our target, of Fisheries Restoration. Conflict created by absurd statistic.. What now of the new Registry? The new MRIP program that should give a much better gauge of participation, Tell us how many fishers there are, The program designed to replace MRFSS.. Maryland's flounder anglers were granted a 3 month extension on season this spring with a very-stern warning: We'll Be Watching. That meant management would close the season early --Again-- if MRFSS said some segment of our recreational fishery had somehow managed to do better than the trawl industry -- Again. I know full-well that managers must do what the voices in MRFSS' hard-drive tell them. As a result I have come to know the deep anguish of early closure, of fiscal catastrophe from worthless statistic, of a season lost not to real oil gushing from a real pipe but meaningless numbers transmitted without wire. . . MRIP's registry.. How many people are really, actually going fishing.. I think that MRIP will show for MRFSS estimates to be correct it would often require that every registered angler had exceeded the legal limit many times over to achieve the statistically estimated catch. MRIP will force many catch estimates down, sometimes way down. Crazy-high estimates will be unsupportable if actually catching that many fish would require a "Catch Per Unit of Effort" far greater than the party/charter fishers experienced... Here's a measure we desperately need: Truth. OK Management: How goes the watching? What if the first result of "The Registry" was to loosen-up, to lower size limits.. That'd be a switch. Wonder if that could happen with the sudden ferocity of a closure.......... I hold that were it not for a very few boulders, storm caused shipwrecks & Nazi Wolf Pack torpedoes, our region's reef ecology --including the fish living on them-- would not have survived into the 1980s. On a budget, our fishery restoration efforts require forward thinking. Yet managers are still attempting to rebuild the huge fish populations of yesteryear with our present day seafloor habitat remnants, the footprint leftover from fishing's industrial revolution..... Consequently; if MRFSS paperwork sez private boats in Maryland caught zero tautog in all of 2006 yet caught 43,505 of these non-migratory man-made reef residents in 2007 - And it does: Then that's bloody-well what happened and quit'cher complaining already. If the scientific paperwork sez there ain't no reef where all those reef-fish and reef-loving lobster get caught, where once far more were caught - And it does: Then there ain't no reef so don't worry about it.. A blood-letting on the full moon with weekly leech treatments and two months of mountain airs should cure the insanity. That'd be some good 'ol fashioned doctoring: Nevermind lead's fumes when returning to work. We squander the economic benefits of 'catch-restriction only' restoration in the disappointment of anglers tossing fish overboard that they might otherwise have taken pictures of, fed their family and friends with.. This isn't billfishing: What goes in the cooler really does matter. In our hot-blooded quota battles caused by catch-data that infuriates, we --year after year-- miss opportunity to begin habitat restoration. Feet under a desk: Papers are real. Two anchors tight, lines down: Fish & fish habitat are real. Rock-Paper-Scissors: Coral grows on rock. Paper wins. Fishers lose. Needs Fixin. Regards, Monty Capt. Monty Hawkins mhawkins@siteone.net Party Boat "Morning Star" Reservation Line 410 520 2076 Morning Star Fishing
  11. I friend of mine sent me these pictures today. They were supposedly taken off shore of Rodanthe North Carolina by a helicopter tour operator. That is all I know. The other picture was sent to me by Bud Corbett of Poquoson. It was taken a couple months ago by a spotter plane over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel.
  12. Well summer is most definitely here. Where was this 7 months ago. Right! This weather by far is much more acceptable than the cold snap here of 2010 that occurred. I welcome this weather year round. I am sure most of us would agree with this too. With that said the fishing the past several weeks has been outstanding. Epic days for sure. With the days being extremely hot out your best bet by far is to start early to beat the heat and finish before it is too hot out to enjoy the day. Start way before sunrise as the bite will drop off as mid day approaches and then will pick back up towards the end of day light hours. Redfish have been the major staple of the Mosquito Lagoon and the Indian River here near the New Smyrna Beach area to the Titusville flats. The redfish bite has been great at first light among the flats all throughout the backcountry waters in shallow waters with baitfish present. Clean water will help too. Sight fishing is at a premium for slot sized red fish and the bigger bull redfish. As always please just give your fellow anglers a very wide gap between you and them if you arrive to an area later than the boats already present. Good distance - 600 feet at least. It is just a common basic courtesy to apply any where you fish in the world. The early bird gets the worm. Many anglers work hard with stealth like tactics to get into position early to be in the right place at the right time. Redfish are hitting a wide variety of bait but the go to bait this time of year is a live finger mullet, mud minnow and soft plastics. Placing a mullet or mud minnow on a 3/0 circle hook and then a targeted precise cast to taillers will work most of the time. Just do not land on the fish you are throwing to and get it in front of them as the tail does not eat. They will spook and they will ALL run. However I have been getting some of the bigger redfish on some hand picked small blue crabs put on a circle hook then with a well placed soft presentation will bring on major big action. DOA plastics with a small weight on them will also produce great action while sight fishing. Please as always with every fish you are handling and landing make the first priority their quick release for a higher survival rate. Trout are being caught in good numbers while working the deeper ledges of the grass flats and the sand bars where mullet and bait fish are moving around. Stay in three to five feet of water. Pig fish will work but are hard to come by this year. As long as you can find clean waters top water baits will produce as well and always as well fly fishing is great on the lagoon. Moving throughout the lagoon and river look for bait pods being hammered by birds and most likely you will find jacks, ladyfish and blues mixed in. Captain Drew Cavanaugh Florida Inshore Fishing Charters Cell/352-223-7897 Email us at: drcfishmaster@cfl.rr.com Light tackle fishing guide on the Mosquito Lagoon. Specializing in fly fishing or spin fishing for redfish, trout, snook and tarpon. Visit us at: Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide - Indian River Redfish Charter - Fishing Orlando Fish the world famous Mosquito Lagoon. The redfish capital of the world!
  13. Yesterday my wife Cindy and I along with my brother John and his wife Renee’ met with my Congressional Representative, Congressman Rob Wittman of Americas first Congressional District for lunch and a tour of the Capital. This came about by way of a Duck’s Unlimited fundraiser a few months ago. Congressman Wittman was kind enough to donate this personalized tour and I was lucky enough to win the bid! We met at his office in the Longworth building around noon and I gave him a framed photo I had taken of New Point Comfort Light recently. From there we went to the Capital Hill Club for a great lunch. We had a good discussion about the Chesapeake Bay regarding the menhaden fishery and oyster aquaculture. Rob Wittman is also an avid angler and an advocate for the Bay so of course I had a good time talking with him. Next he took us to the Capital where we were fortunate to see a vote in progress. There were many other Congressmen present and it was impressive to see it all in action. Afterward we walked to the Rotunda where Congressman Wittman gave us a great lesson in history, art and architecture. All told we spent over two hours together. It was an experience we will not soon forget. Gordon Neal, the Congressman’s Staff Assistant, gave us an extended tour of the rest of the Capital building. Later in the day the four of us walked the Mall area. My wife’s father is a World War Two Veteran and my father was in Korea and Vietnam so we all wanted to see those memorial sites. Here are some of the pictures I took.
  14. Sent to me by Capt. Max King 37' 2010 Contender Check out this Contender that "ran aground". Boat was only 6 hours old. Operator claimed he was doing 28 knots. Both people on board were 100% sober. Cost him $10,000 to have Tow Boat US pull him back to the water. 4 tow lines parted in the process. MSRP on the boat ranges from $300,000 to $400,000 depending on options."
  15. In the past year i have witnessed some very rude and some dangerous moves made by my fellow anglers. Growing up on the Eastern Shore i had a boat at a young age. The very first thing that i was taught by my father was safety and ethics on the water. Most of these ideals that he taught were mainly common sense and courtesy toward other boaters. This past year was my first year fishing the mouth of the bay for strippers. I had a very good first season, but saw things that really bothered me. This past Saturday was just as disappointing as last winter. I had three boats drift so close to my boat that I had to push them away from me with my hands. All while the captain stared in disbelief that I was upset with him. I had my line cut, while anchored, by a boat that passed wide open by my stern within 40ft, and not to mention the wake that he threw over me. One thing that I really don't understand is how people can take the entire bay and feel the need to run at high speeds in between 20 anchored boats on their trip north or south. One of my friends I had on my boat with me is in the USCG. He told me that there is a law in place that will require boaters to have a drivers license within the next few years. I think that this is a great idea. The things I mentioned above aren't just gripes, but concerns of the safety of myself and other anglers. Some things that people can do to better the experience for everyone on the water would be to go around a group of boats that are anchored up instead of through them on your way to your destination. Be conscious of the fishing lines of others, (your hook isn't the only one on bottom). Be aware of your wake and where it is going to head once you've left the area. If it can be proven that it was your wake that caused damage, you are responsible for it. Don't drift or anchor to close to another boat. Be particularly careful when passing or motoring around a boat that contains children. I saw 2 almost get thrown off the other day when a 25ft Parker passed at 1/2 throttle no more than 50ft from their boat. I could go on all day. The bottom line is that most of the anglers out there do know these things and are respectful of others on the water, but its that ever growing percentage that can make a great day on the water aggravating or even dangerous. I'm sure that many will read this and agree. Maybe even have had similar things happen to you. To others, this may piss you off. If so, you are the problem. Keep your boat on the trailer and next to the SUV / station wagon thing.
  16. I had a friend i grew up with, Kevin, in town this weekend so i took him and the brother in law out for some spades at the CBBT. Once again the morning started off with some rough water but it laid out pretty nicely by the middle of the day. We tried my favorite spot with no luck which was a first. Then we moved around to the other side of the 4th. Within 10 minutes we had our first spade of the day. We ended up with 7 spades all a ranging from 4-5lbs. Which were larger than the previous week. We headed back to the ramp at wise piont around 1 and had another great day on the bay.
  17. Ok, so I have my molds for 3,4,5 & 6 oz bucktails and parachutes ordered. They should be here in a couple days. I already have powder coat, which I know will be better, however I'm guessing that it'll be the more expensive option. The other option is vinyl paint. I'm thinking that will be cheaper but less durable. How about some input everyone! By the way, if I can get good at making them (umbrellas, tandem bucktails and parachutes, and singles) I'm hoping to market some of them....
  18. :glasses1:Pat Fitzgerald and his sons have fished with me for years. This year, the boys brought some friends along for a boat-load of six, including Pat, sons Jimmy and Tommy and friends, Matthew, Jacob, and Brandon. We headed out of New Pass Thursday morning, 7/1, to fish in 44 feet. The boys caught a mess of yellowtail snapper and kept two of those that were 14 inches. They also caught a few nice whitebone porgies to 15 inches, along with a 44-inch king mackerel. We caught a big blue runner, about 4 ½ pounds, and used him as bait to hook and release a huge goliath grouper—I estimated him at about 375 pounds and about as big around as an oil-drum! We also released small mangrove snapper, triggerfish, Spanish mackerel and porgies. Friday, 7/2, Scott and Jeanette Thron and friends, Mike Radkin and Jerry Vojtush, had hoped to spend a full-day fishing offshore. But, after checking the weather forecast, I had to tell them that we’d likely be lucky to get a half-day in before the rains. So, we headed out of New Pass with intentions to fish as long as we could. We did well with hogfish, catching four of them, three of which were keepers to 16 ½ inches. We also caught eight keeper mangrove snapper to 14 inches, keeper porkfish to 12 inches and some keeper whitebone porgies, all on live shrimp. We released smaller porgies and yellowtail snapper, along with a 90-pound goliath grouper that bit a 25-inch mackerel. We made it in just before the heavy rains began so we got wet while cleaning fish but, at least, we were off the water. After a rainy weekend over the 4th of July holiday, long-time customers, Dennis and Jamie Riddell brought their friends, Doyce & Kay Paine along to fish offshore with me on Monday morning, 7/5. We fished with live shrimp in 34 feet, off of Naples. Dennis caught a keeper gag grouper at 23 inches and Jamie caught two keeper hogfish, 13 ½ and 15 inches. The group also caught a half dozen keeper mangrove snapper to 15 inches. We had tried to catch a grouper on a pinfish at one point, reeled in the bait and had it hanging just at the water’s surface to lure a cobia, when a 4-foot bull shark bit the pinfish—we released him, along with some smaller mangrove snapper and undersized triggerfish. Tuesday morning, the rains held off but seas were pretty sloppy early in the day, having been churned up by storms the evening before. I headed offshore with Tanner Rust and family to 45 feet, and we decided not to venture further than that in the sloppy conditions. The boys had a great time with goliath grouper, hooking and releasing seven of those, to 150 pounds. They also released mangrove and yellowtail snapper shorts, short red grouper and short gag grouper to 21 inches. They caught a mess of good-sized whitebone porgies and grunts so they could have something to cook after their day of goliath adventures. Tim Otterlee and his three young sons fished Wednesday morning with me, over live-bottom in about 35 feet, near-shore, where we caught keeper mangrove and lane snapper, porgies and Spanish mackerel. We released red grouper shorts. Robert Duhlberg was in town on business, along with his boss, Lair, so the two snuck away for a morning of fishing in Estero Bay on Thursday. We used live shrimp to catch eleven trout, though only one was keeper size at 16 inches. We also caught fifteen mangrove snapper, two of which were keepers. Monday morning, 7/12, Frank Krumm and his twelve-year-old son, Jordan, fished in 75 feet with me, using live shrimp. They caught six keeper yellowtail snapper and released smaller ones, along with porgies and triggerfish. They had planned to fish all day, but decided they'd had enough heat by 1PM, so we returned then. The photo shown is of young angler Alex Bayer, with a 28-inch kingfish, caught on shrimp on a recent offshore trip.
  19. I traded a friend my Daiwa Grandwave 5500BR for his Team Ala rod. The reel was cool, but im a Shimano Groupie! LOL Anyway I had this rod for a couple weeks but didn't have a reel to put on it. So like any Tackle Whore would do I used that as an excuse to get me a reel.. So after some research I decided on the Shimano Power Aero Prosurf. The reel arrived, and was promptly filled with 250yrds of 15lb Suffix braid (with mono backing). So anyway I decided to go fishing today, and today I would test out the rod.. Well today the fishing sucked, but it gave me time to put the rod thru a couple test cast. Let me first start off by saying the rod is not built for the uni-tech, overhead thump or any other cast that requires a stiffish tip. However with a fishing OTG cast it excels. Once I figured out the correct drop, it seemed to launch my baited rig (homemade single drop rig w\ 4oz) pretty far i would say 130-150yards (maybe more).. I can't be positive but I'll take it to the field tomorrow afternoon, and hopefully get video\pics. Anyway first impression are positive, but it's way to early to say for sure. My intended purpose for the rod is for the Bay\DE Surf spring run. It seems to be perfect for 4-5oz and a worm, but Im not postive about larger baits.. Time will tell.. http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4245-1.jpg[/img]"] http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4243-1.jpg[/img]"] http://www.atlanticanglers.com/images/imported/2010/07/IMG_4244-1.jpg[/img]"]
  20. By Captain Alan Sherman Seagrasses can be found all over the world in shallow bays, lagoons, estuaries and along coastal waters. Where there is water there are boaters navigating these waters successfully and often times not so successfully. In most areas the water is deep enough for their propellers to cut through the water without causing any damage to the bottom below them but the unsuccessful boaters that stray away from their appropriate depth of water can cause significant damage to the beds of seagrasses often unaware of how much damage they have created. As the propellers of these vessels make contact with the fragile seagrasses the propellers cut into the soft sand or mud bottoms creating a trench that is deeper than the waters adjacent to the freshly cut trench. Besides the propeller cutting the trench the propeller also cuts the fragile seagrasses leaving this deeper trench void of all seagrasses. The damage created is called a propeller scar or prop trail. A propeller scar may be just a few feet in length but can also be hundreds of yards or more in length. Almost immediately erosion of these propeller scars starts to take place making the trails wider and deeper and creating cloudy water from tidal flow and wave action. Seagrass meadows made up of one or many seagrasses such as turtle grass, shoal grass, manatee grass, star grass, widgeon grass, paddle grass and Johnson’s sea grass are very important to the shallow bays, lagoons and coastal waters all over the world because these seagrasses help provide protective nurseries and food sources for many marine species. These seagrasses also increase water qualities in the areas of the seagrass meadows and reduce wave energy along the coastlines. Columbia Sportswear, Bass Pro Shops and The Ocean Foundation have joined hands in an effort to restore seagrass meadows through education and habitat restoration. Recently I was invited take part in a two day event sponsored by Columbia Sportswear, The Ocean Foundation, Seagrass Recovery, Andy Newman, Bass Pro Shops and George Poveromo. The event was put together to bring awareness to how serious these propeller scars can be to our fragile bays, lagoons, shallow coastal waters and estuaries. During the event I had the opportunity to see firsthand propeller scars that had been accidently cut into fragile seagrass flats in Florida Bay off of Islamorada and then I got to take part in the actual repair of one of these propeller scars. With the guidance of the Seagrass Recovery project representatives, Kenny Wright and Beau Williams I was able to take part in repairing a propeller scar. Once at the sight of a propeller scar located just a few minutes from Wide World Sportsman in Islamorada it was quite obvious how bad a propeller scar actually is. I looked out on the beautiful green grass meadow only to see this horrific looking white stripe that had been cut into the meadow by a boater who thought there was more water under the propeller than there actually was. We anchored our boat and I donned a mask and snorkel and jumped into the crystal clear water that was just two feet deep. As I snorkeled the barren propeller scar it was obvious that the scar was deeper then the water surrounding it and that the seagrasses on the edge of that scar couldn’t grow into the trench. This scar was fairly new and had not grown much since the propeller scar had been created. Others joined me and then we started the repair of the propeller scar. First four foot biodegradable sediment tubes were place one at a time into the propeller scar. Once the propeller scar had been filled with these biodegradable sediment tubes long pieces of PVC tubing with wooden stands attached to the tops of the tube were driven into the ground and spaced out along the biodegradable sediment tubes. These biodegradable sediment tubes over the course of time will break down and completely fill the propeller scar bringing the depth of that scar back to its original level. The PVC tubes and stands are there to attract birds that will come and sit on the stands and eventually fertilize the area around the propeller scar with their guano. Three months after the biodegradable sediment tubes have been placed in the propeller scar, a crew from Seagrass Recovery will visit the site and plant seagrass plugs that were retrieved off the sea surface into the restored propeller scar. Twelve to eighteen months later the propeller scar will have been totally restored. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Seagrass Grow Project or would like more information on the Seagrass Grow Project than please visit these internet sites. Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) Sponsors of this Event were: Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) BassPro Shops/World Wide Sportsman (Bass Pro Shops Outdoors Online: Offering the best in Fishing, Hunting and Outdoor Products) Andy Newman, NewmanPR, the Florida Keys (NewmanPR) George Poveromo, Columbia Athlete, (George Poveromo's World Of Saltwater Fishing)
  21. Chinese mitten crabs, first reported in the Chesapeake Bay, are more widespread than initially thought. Four crabs have now been caught in Delaware Bay during the last week of May 2007, and may occur in other waters of the U.S. east coast. The "furry-looking" claws distinguish the Chinese mitten crab from native crabs. This Chinese mitten crab was caught by a waterman fishing for Blue crabs in the Upper Chesapeake Bay on May 18. (Credit: Greg Ruiz, Smithsonian) In total, seven adult male mitten crabs have been documented from the two bays since 2005. Prior to this, the potentially invasive species had never been recorded from coastal waters of the eastern United States. The mitten crab is native to eastern Asia and has already invaded Europe and the western United States, where it has established reproductive populations. The crab occurs in both freshwater and saltwater. Young crabs spend their lives in freshwater and migrate to saltwater estuaries for reproduction. Named for the unusual thick fur-like coating on its claws, the mitten crab looks very different than native crabs and is easily recognized. It is listed as injurious wildlife under the Federal Lacey Act, due to its potential to cause ecological and economic damage. "We don't know the present status of this crab along the eastern U.S. coast" said Gregory Ruiz, senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. "At the moment, it is not clear whether these crabs are reproducing or established in the Mid-Atlantic region, or whether the captured crabs are just a few individuals that originated elsewhere." These crabs may have arrived in the ballast water of ships or through live trade. A Mitten Crab Network has been established to examine the abundance, distribution, and reproductive status of crabs in Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay and other estuaries along the eastern United States. The initial partnership between the Smithsonian lab, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, is now being expanded to include resource managers, commercial fishermen, research organizations and citizens along the east coast. Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by Smithsonian.
  22. Here are some pictures from the last week of Sharkin! Enjoy! They are definitely here! Sandbar: First shark of the night guiding some of my high school buddies! 7ft 5inches tagged and released Shark Number two of the night reeled in by my buddy Kyle: 7ft 3 inches, tagged and released "That was one hell of a bi's and tri's workout" Tonight my friend Ryan wanted to take a trip out, and he got to reel in this 7ft 4 incher. It was also tagged and released despite the terror of the family watching! The dad thought it was awesome though.....not the wife.... Lovin this weather! Ben Dziwulski
  23. Here is an excerpt from our FREE weekly e-newsletter. For the rest of the story, you may subscribe by contacting Kevin HERE Simply type newsletter in your email. You may opt out at anytime. Friday I had some brand new clients fresh from California. Joe M. and his two sons Dan and Michael had just a super day with stripers in the morning and bluefish and big croaker after lunch. The blues were especially abundant, and fun, as they averaged two to four pounds with several becoming airborne like miniature tarpon. What a blast this was for three fellows that haven't done much light tackle fishing. The guys did real well and I think they're hooked. This bluefish action is just starting to heat up and should last for the remainder of the summer. This is great fun on light spinning and fly tackle for anyone wanting to test their endurance. Capt. Kevin Josenhans Josenhans Fly Fishing 443-783-3271
  24. BERLIN, Md. -- Two areas of Assateague Island National Seashore will be temporarily closed to public use in order to protect breeding piping plovers. The closed areas include the southern portion of the public Over-Sand Vehicle route south of kilometer marker 23.5, and a section of ocean beach and island interior north of Assateague State Park. The closures will begin on or around June 24th and remain in effect for up to four weeks.The area closures are necessary to protect Piping Plovers, small migratory shorebirds that nest on open, sandy beaches and raise their chicks along the ocean, bay and interior sand flats where they feed on insects and other invertebrates. On Assateague, the Piping Plover breeding season generally runs from April through mid-August. Plovers are easily disturbed by humans and will leave their nests or feeding areas if approached. Source: PLOVER: Two areas of Assateague Island National Seashore closed for nesting | delmarvanow.com | The Daily Times
  25. I've asked around and I'm not quite sure what kind of skate this is. People have ideas but nobodys sure. Anyone know? I've heard so far it was two different types by two different people I was hoping to find someone who sees them on a regular basis and would know for sure