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Found 1004 results

  1. Ok with all the talk this year of getting a big shark and with all the new to shark fishing anglers I felt that a thread of general shark fishing tactics and responsibilities should be posted. In my opinion if you want to catch a shark but have never done it ask us here on atlantic anglers for someone to join you to "show the ropes". Better to have experience with you the first time you hook up to that big one with your adrenaline pumping and nerves shot. The other thing is to know where to set up and keep your targeted game on the hush side of things. Im not saying to hide the fact that your sharkin just dont tell everyone you run into on what your going after. We don't need any more attention to what we are fishin for than what is already being made. Case in point, a fellow shark angler has had great success sharkin up north this year and has posted pictures all over the place. Because of this, this northern state will now be putting in regulations on yaking out baits for quote unquote "big game". Shark fishing is not illegal,but it is walking a fine line. A lot of the sharks being caught are on the near threatened or threatened species list. If the wrong person catches a shark being mishandled things can get ugly real quick. Now back to location, I emphasized this because I don't think it would be a wise idea to go down to lets say ocean city and set up shop next to dozens of swimmers looking to catch a toothy critter. I know they are their anyway but to city officials you attracted them to that spot, also using bait attracts them their not because the shark just happens to be their. I am not trying to complain just want for everyone to be able to enjoy catching these beautiful species for many more years, and want to ensure everyone fishing for them uses good common sense so no one gets hurt including the shark. give some feedback and lets see what everyone else has to say.
  2. Things are slow here in the Myrtle Beach/Murrells Inlet SC area this time of year... Fishing Reports Myrtle Beach/Murrells Inlet area Fishing Report Fishing the Murrells Inlet/Myrtle Beach area is seasonal with the fishing a little slow for March til the middle of April. Mid April, the fishing starts to pick-up for some Flounder and Red Drum. Everything[Fishing] is always weather related in Murrells Inlet and Myrtle Beach the sooner the water temp. gets in the 60's the fishing will get better. Late April thru December is always a good time for fishing for Red Drum, the bait moves in and the fishing turns on. June, July and August, the water temp is getting rite for ALL fishing in the Murrells Inlet/Myrtle Beach areas! Everything is good at the beach! People are out in the sun,shopping,fishing and the Murrells Inlet/Myrtle Beach area is hopping! August and September the Spanish and King Mackerel are on the beach and can be caught live baiting along the coast. We often catch them at the jetties or 3-mile reef or trolling with planners and spoons. Fishing at Murrells Inlet/Myrtle Beach during the summer months you never know what you are going to hook-up with so expect to catch a anything while fishing,maybe even a SHARK. For all you that like catching Trout, Weakfish Trout are plentiful sometimes around Sept/ Oct. While the true Winter Trout only starts when the water temps start dropping in to the 60's and lower. I'm Capt Shannon Currie and hope you have a great fishing experience while fishing in Murrells Inlet/Myrtle Beach please call or visit the site below if you need more info.There you will find all fishing info and pictures.
  3. A bunch of friends and I are heading down to Assateague March 13th through the end of the weekend. I an experienced fisherman but I've never been to the island. I've been doing research and was wondering is someone could tell me what I could expect to catch that time of year down there. I've seen a lot of the shark pictures and have the kayaks to bring bait far out but wanted to know if they'll even be active in-shore that early. Also I know most guys are tight lipped when it comes to spots but if someone could point me in the right direction as far as location it would be much appreciated although I'm not sure that that is really possible when it comes to surf fishing. Thanks for any help.
  4. caught this peculiar looking creature at the CHSP pier about a week ago...it was 5-6 inches long...any idea what its called???
  5. tried fishing assateague island for the last time saturday night got skunked again as normal for the past 17 years . what am i missing other than fish . never see any thing other than small skates n shark smaller than 16'' . think i'll stick to fishing delaware's beaches , they are closer and more actual fish worth catching. WHAT AM I MISSING?!
  6. Hello all, I have been making my hook leaders on my fish finders as short as possible. Around 2-3". I have seen some that have been using a 8-12" hook leader on their fish finders. I always thought the shorter the better for casting distance but there has to be some reason for the longer leaders. Is it to keep the hook as far away from the sinker as possible? Of course casting distance is always an issue but how much is it effected with the longer leader? Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Also, how imprtant is it for the hook leader to be as straight as possible? When i am tying the leader to the swivel with a uni it always sems to get a little kinked. Thanks for your help!
  7. Went to <acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island"><acronym title="Rhode Island">RI</acronym></acronym></acronym> on our little 3 day family trip we do every year.Camped at Burlingame.Got there Thursday and set up camp.Friday morning we launched out of the Charlestown Breachway and headed to Block Island.The sky was overcast I sea was clam and like glas.I have never seen it like that.We have wanted to head out there for a few years.We have got fish off Nebraska Shoal,but,the guy in the bait shop kept telling up to go to the block.We got there and there was 50 boats or so fishing the self.I dropped a Diamond jig and Bam,I got a 6 lb Blue.We hammered fish till noon BIG blues Keeper Stripers (no monsters) some Dogfish and a Skate or two. We headed over to Fisherman's Point around 1 pm.Met the family,had lunch.Then we loaded the boat with our 2 boys and all the Scuba gear.Took them out to the Shoal.It was there first open dive in the ocean.We sat on the boat while they we down.It sucked sitting there ,but,I was on the water and .oh well.They came up after 20 mins or so ,telling us of the HUGE Stripes and Blues they saw and an abundance of other sea life.Pretty cool.Just as they came up ,the sky got dark.We headed in and half way back we got HAMMERED! We got to the boat ramp,it was low tide.I jumped off the boat bare foot,stepped on the ramp.Next thing I knew I was getting picked up off the concrete ramp.I went down hard.Cut up my hand ,and I'm hurting still. We loaded up and head to Galilee got 6 lbs of Steamers and headed back to camp/I washed the Steamers and let them sit in cornmeal till the next day. Saturday we headed out in the am again .After a night of soaking thunder storms.The sea was 2-3 ' waves.We headed to Block Island again.Rough LONG ride out there.We fished the same spots.About 70 boats out there.We didn't get any Stripers but,I got a PB Blue fish at 15 lbs!What a fight!The sea calmed down around 10 and so did the fishing.We hung till noon and went back to camp.The boys picked up 6 1 1/2 -2 lbs Lobsters.We went back to camp and had a seafood feast fit for a King.Plus Pork chops, baked potatos, best corn on the cob I have had so far this season, we got at a farm stand by Matunik exit off rt 1..Just as we finished eating.the sky started to darken.We had checked the weather for last night and Sunday.It said rain.So ,we packed up and headed home.Just as we left the sky opened up again.
  8. Good to get back on the sand & salt today (Saturday 8/14), my Baby Bird & I hit it late 10am to noon window. The Refuge Beach surf was up and rough when we first got there given the low pressure system/front with NE 5K. So initially lite tackle bottom fishin was out so I put two drum rods out on frozen mullet. No grass yet. High tide was ~1145am. At the top of the tide the current/surf dropped out so we could hold bottom w/lite tackle. Caught a small spot and a 15" sea mullet on BW fishbites ~ shunk off. Then the heaver goes for a short run with a fresh cut piece of spot resulting in a 3-4' Blacktip shark AKA toothy critter hitting the beach and released. Caught one more baby blacktip a 12" job before the grass set in on the out going tide making it unfishable. So we wrapped it on up and headed back to the house. Highlight was the little toothy critter for folks but a bit out matched on my 13' CTS rod. While the low spot was when my new custom 11' Wheels Reels rod (WRI 1143 rated 4-7oz) broke on the cast. Only the second surf rod I've broke on the cast in 20 yrs of surf fishing! Fortunately, our local rod builder Ronnie Hogwood of R&S Custom Rods Norfolk, VA (757) 588-0429 will give me credit towards a different blank as I sure as heck don't want another WRI rod anytime soon. All this is just practice and a part of gearing up for the Fall big red drum run Tight lines, `bucket
  9. I didn't see any mention of this in any other thread so I though I would share this story I heard on the radio today. Apparently a extremely rare species of whale worked it way up the Assawoman bay and got stuck and was eventually euthanized. It's unfortunate to see that happen but it will provide scientists with a good opportunity to learn more about it. Looks to be at about 120th street in <acronym title="Ocean City">OC</acronym>. Ocean City Maryland News - Rare Whale Found In Coastal Bays
  10. I have some family in town this week so i offered to take my uncle and cousins fishing. We headed out of wise point around 9am and found a nice smooth ride to the highrise. With my uncle, cousin Jim and the wife on board we started by drifting for flounder. Within minutes we had our first flounder on board caught by my wife. It was her first flounder ever but it came up an inch short. I tried around the piles for spades but only had a few nibbles and didnt even see any in the water. On one drift past the piles my uncle caught a nice triggerfish and a few minuts later i had one as well. This was my first trigger. He caught his on squid and mine was caught on shrimp. We continued to drift around hoping for that keeper flounder but after 9 caught and all thrown back we diecided to go to the 4th island. It didnt take long and we started to catch fish. Still no keepers though. Tried for spades at the 4th as well with no luck. We headed back to the highrise and caught a few more throw back flounder and headed in around 4. We ended the day with 12 flounder, all within an inch of legal size, countless huge oystertoads, black sea bass, 2 triggers around 4 lbs, and of course a ray. We caught fish constantly all day and had a great time. The best flounder bait seemed to be minnow/squid combo (best oyster toad bait too!!). I did catch one on a "lead head" with a twister tail tipped with squid while jigging across the bottom. Thanks to everyone that replied to my flounder rig question. We had a great time cating them. Maybe next time we can keep a few.
  11. Hey guys, thanks a lot for the info on this forum. I'm buddies with mwheatley, who posted here before our last trip two weeks ago. The info you guys have shared with us has proved to be a big help. Our first trip was a big success. Our first time out we caught two nice sharks, the largest being a 6 1/2 foot sand tiger. We went out again to <acronym title="Assateague Island"><acronym title="Assateague Island">AI</acronym></acronym> this last weekend Friday night/Saturday morning, a few miles down from our spot two weeks ago. This time we got skunked (except for a tiny 18 incher). If you don't mind, I've got a few questions. When we went two weeks ago there was no moon and the beach was full of sand fleas and crabs. They were everywhere. I can't help but think fish had come in to feed on these critters, and other fish came in to feed on those fish, etc., and sharks were more active. This time, it was nearly a full moon so there was plenty of light and no crabs/sand fleas. Plus there were no bigger sharks caught. (The moon did set about 4:00 am, and the crabs did come out then, and that's when we caught our small 18 incher.) So my first question is, have you guys seen any correlation between lunar cycles and shark catches (i.e., it's better with no moon, worse at full moon)? Or are other factors more significant, i.e. wind direction and water temp, more significant than the lunar cycle. (Last time we went (July 16/17), I didn't record the air or water temp, but there was a definite east wind, and the air seemed a bit cooler. This time, the wind was from the south-southwest, and it seemed generally warmer.) Second question is we're halving our bunker, casting out 1/2 pieces (5-6 inch head and tail). We did the same last time and caught some nice sharks with it. But if we were to cut the bunker into thirds, we could cast it further out. So there's trade offs with small bait (less blood trail, harder for sharks to find) cast out further or larger bait (more blood trail, easier to find) cast out not nearly as far. Are you guys halving your bunker or are you cutting it into smaller pieces and getting it further? What do you think yields more hits? Thanks in advance for the info. You guys have been a big help.
  12. I'll be staying the upcoming weekend in North Beach. My buddies and I will be fishing the bay from yaks. I read a book that says the floor of the bay around north beach is featureless and therefore not that great of a fishing spot. I can't seem to find anything more online. Anyone have any good stories fishing from the North Beach/Cheasapeake Beach area? Blues, Rock, Croaker, anything? Thanks, Joel
  13. A few things to consider before shark fishing By Mark Sampson OCEAN CITY -- I applaud those who pursue sharks from the beach. I'm sorry that I don't have the time during the summer months to do so myself. But the more photos I see of sharks taken from the beach, the more concerned I get about the well-being of the sharks that are caught and released. Sandbars, duskies and sand tigers are the larger sharks most likely to be landed by local surf anglers, since they are also three species of sharks that may not legally be retained at any time by recreational anglers, in most cases when a large shark is taken from a Delmarva beach it must be released. As the sport grows, too many anglers are jumping into it without the knowledge or skills needed to ethically deal with such large animals. Anglers who choose to mess with 100- to 200-pound sharks have better have their act together or the results might not fare well for fish or fisherman. Obviously there are safety issues for those handling the sharks, and one bad move could result in serious injuries. These ain't stripers, boys! For now I'll just suggest that fishermen keep their limbs out of the pointy end of their catch. I see too many photos of gut-hooked sharks and sharks that have been dragged too far from the water's edge. Anglers must keep in mind that just because they see a shark swim away after release, that it doesn't mean it's OK. Sharks can be so stressed out or damaged by improper handling. That's not a good outcome for the three species so often caught in the surf that are on the Prohibited Species List because their populations are so low. Do not pull sharks up onto the dry sand for photos or any other reason. Dragging a large shark by its tail can cause injuries to its vertebrae and other internal parts. During the day, the temperature away from the wet zone of the beach is going to be a lot warmer, and warm, dry air does a shark's skin no good. Before a shark is even hooked anglers should have a plan ready for a quick release. Cameras, tags, measuring devices and any other tools should be ready and available so there's no fumbling around at the last minute. Anglers should also forget about calling in friends or family to "come down to the beach and see what I caught!" There's no time for that. Get the shark in from the surf just far enough that it can be safely handled, snap a few photos and get it back to its home ASAP. In many of the photos I've seen of sharks on the beach, it's clear that the shark was gut-hooked. While gut-hooking does not necessary mean a death sentence for every fish, it certainly increases the chance for mortality. If a hook impaled in the gut isn't bad enough, imagine the internal damage to a shark that's done if the animal is dragged partially up the beach by the leader. The hooks would likely tear the stomach and impale other organs inside the animal. I know a lot of beach fishermen are wisely using circle hooks, but some are still doing things the old way and using big double hook rigs with J-hooks. Double J-hook rigs kill sharks. They should never be used. I know a lot of sharkers like to use large baits such as rays, and feel that two hooks are needed to keep the bait properly attached to the rig. That problem can be overcome with a little creative rigging and sometimes the use of cable ties or rigging wire. Single, non-offset circle hooks -- I suggest the Mustad 39960D -- are the only way to go for shark fishing from beach or boat. Still, circle hooks still have a 5-10 percent chance of gut-hooking. There's something about the way a shark's throat closes-up that too often traps even a circle hook and allows it to embed itself inside the shark rather than in the jaw as it was designed to do. Observing this, we began experimented with different rigs and hooks that would help ensure that sharks would be hooked in the jaw every time. What we came up with is what we call a blocker rig, a length of plastic pipe mounted perpendicular to the leader a specific distance from the hook. The pipe prevents or "blocks" the fish from swallowing the bait. We've documented an almost 100 percent success rate of preventing gut hooking since we started using these rigs in 2008. This season we're trying to determine if the blocker-rig is as effective at getting bites as a standard nonblocker rig. We've been fishing both type of rigs side-by-side and recording the results of every bite. So far our records indicate almost a perfect 50-50 split, indicating that the sharks are not shying away from the awkward looking rig. I didn't really plan on promoting this rig until we'd finished tweaking it out a bit more, but the aforementioned evidence of so many sharks being gut hooked from the beach has prompted me to do so now. I'm certain it has saved the lives of a lot of sharks that would otherwise have eventually died after being gut-hooked. Blocker rigs are easy to make using PVC or any other type of plastic pipe. For small sharks we use an 8-inch length of plastic tubing, drill a hole through its mid-section and run our wire leader through the hole. Using crimps or twisted wire, the pipe is fastened to the leader 4 inches above the eye of the hook; it can rotate but not slide up or down on the leader. When we expect larger sharks such as makos, blues, tigers, or sand tigers we'll use 14-inch lengths of half-inch PVC mounted 7 inches above the eye of the hook. For really large sharks such as big tigers we increased the length of the pipe to 24 inches since they have such wide mouths. The measurement from the eye of the hook to the pipe is important because if it's too long, the hook can still reach the shark's throat. Anyone who wishes to try making blocker rigs of their own are welcome to call me in the evening for more details at 410-213-2442 or e-mail me at modernsharking@ gmail.com. Source - A few things to consider before shark fishing | delmarvanow.com | The Daily Times
  14. I remember someone on here talking about the haywire twist for tying steel leader to hooks/swivels. just wondering how strong it is, i couldn't find any crimps anywhere around my house so i just used that knot for tying the leader to my hook and swivel(going down for a night tomorrow with some friends). It took some practice but it seems really strong when i try pulling on it, any help would be appreciated, thanks
  15. This will be my last update until October. I’m having a surgical procedure that will keep me off the water until then. We are in the long hot days of summer. That means that fishing tactics have to be changed to put together a good catch. The dolphin season has been for the most part disappointing in our area. It started out good and once again when it should have kicked into high gear, the bottom fell out. We’ve had a lack of weedlines and floating debris. Even the birds have not ventured offshore in large numbers. Those that have found fish have found small ones that either wouldn’t eat or were below the legal size limit. Yes, there have been some good catches, however, dolphin fishing has been very hit or miss. In on the reef, it’s been bonito and kingfish, AJ’s on the wrecks, and some blackfin tuna along with a few sailfish. The change in tactic for the hot days has been to fish the baits deeper on break away leads, downrigger, and bottom rods. The best action we’ve seen has been in the 130 – 250 foot range. Tarpon fishing has been excellent in the Bay. It just requires adjusting the hours you fish so that you can take advantage of the best tide conditions. The fish have been in the 15 – 40 pound range and are putting on a great aerial show as well as pulling extremely have. It’s gorilla tarpon fishing at its best to keep them away from the structure they are trying to cut you off with. Robert Oldin and Mike got into some outstanding tarpon action in the Bay. Normally the land to hook up ratio with Bay fish is about 50%. The circle hooks and anglers did an outstanding job and we finished the evening with a 4 for 4 record. Way to go guys. Ash Suresh and Jeff Moyle came all the way from Australia on a business/pleasure trip. Tarpon action was on the pleasure part of the trip. We had to fish much later hours to catch the tide. We had a shot at 3 fish. Two of the fish hooked up and we landed and released one of them. The third fish bent the rod, however, the hook didn’t find the mark. Brian Spann and his son Jordan saw plenty of arm pulling action with bonito. At one point, we had four fish hooked up at once and neither angler had a chance to catch their breath between fighting fish. Fred and Michael Gates along with Benjamin Siboni got in some kids fishing trip action as well as offshore action. Benjamin was visiting from France. He spoke very little English, however, fishing is a universal language that all anglers understand. We anchored up in 25 feet of water and put out the chum bag. It didn’t take long before we had lots of fish behind the boat. Michael and Benjamin fished the bottom catching yellowtail snapper, triggerfish, and grunts just as fast as they could put baits in the water. Fred freelined his baits and caught yellowtail snapper, mangrove snapper, and a giant bluerunner. It didn’t take long before everyone’s arms were tired and we ran out to finish the trip. We caught a bonito fairly quickly and then had to wait a bit before we were rewarded with a nice blackfin tuna. Debbie Currier and Wade Robinson saw plenty of action on their half day trip. The flatlines and downrigger shined on this day. Bonito and kingfish kept Wade busy pulling in fish and Debbie busy with the camera. The bonito were of the bionic size and would not give up. The kingfish gave Wade plenty of steaks and fillets to take home as they weighed in at 13 ½ and 18 pounds on the scale back at TNT Marine Center. Lewis and David Carroll along with Lloyd Wruble saw lots of tarpon on their trip. David and Lewis used fly tackle and Lloyd used jigs on a spinning outfit. The fish were moving through in singles, doubles, and triples. Everyone got fish to bump their offerings, but no strong takers. As the movement slowed down we set up to use live bait. Before I could pin the bait on the second outfit, David hooked up with a beautiful 30 pound tarpon that jumped numerous times and buzzed plenty of line off the reel. Lloyd got video of the fight as David brought the fish alongside for release. I took my bath as the fish exploded while I was releasing it and got soaked. Michael Richmond, Andrew Arnold, and Mike Bess had dolphin fillets on their mind as we headed offshore. We had a flat calm day and found several slicks with weed in them. The third line that we worked in 850 feet gave us our reward. Both slow trolled baits got hit and the action started. Almost as quickly as it started, it ended. Then a rain storm pushed offshore and it took about a half hour for it to move through. Another weedline produced nothing. The next line had us hooked up again, but one fish threw the hook on its first jump and the hooked pulled on the other fish while we waited to see if there were any buddies following them. The final action of the morning came in the form of a very large tripletail that was hanging out around a large plastic livewell floating in the weedline. That brings me up to date. Check back in October when I get back out on the water. In the meantime, give me a call or send me an email to get that date booked to get in on the Fall action. Captain Dave Kostyo Knot Nancy Fishing Charters, Inc 305-965-9454 Charter Fishing in Miami and Miami Beach for Sailfish, Tarpon, Dolphin and Kingfish aboard the Knot Nancy nkostyo@bellsouth.net
  16. “No oil—No spoil Our Beaches are Clean—Our Waters Pristine” Tim Reid fished near-shore with me, about ten miles off the beach Saturday morning, 7/17. Winds and seas, which were calm most of the week, had picked up quite a bit and seas were a little sloppy, so we decided to stay near-shore and do some shark fishing. We site-casted on the surface, using pinfish strips on a mackerel-rig, and we caught and released fourteen sharp-nose sharks to 40 inches. Tuesday, Daniel Wallace and friends fished with me. Seas were predicted to be two-to-three feet, but they were much rougher than that. We headed to the reefs and decided not to go any further offshore, due to conditions. We fished with live shrimp and caught a 16-inch flounder, a keeper triggerfish and mangrove snapper and grunts. Having seen what the gulf was like on Tuesday, I advised Jim Shubert, his son Terry, and grandson, T.J. to fish inshore on Wednesday. We did well with trout and caught fifteen of those, four of which were keepers, ranging 15 ½ to 16 ½ inches. We caught a keeper sheepshead at 15 ½ inches and a keeper redfish at 21 inches. We released a mess of mangrove snapper, all but four, which were keeper size. We used live shrimp and a popping cork for the trout and live shrimp tossed under the mangroves for the redfish and the snapper. Kevin Coyle and son, Paul, fished Estero Bay with me on Thursday morning. The trout bite was again active and we caught fifteen of those on shrimp, but most were undersized and released. We also caught keeper Spanish mackerel and mangrove snapper. Kevin also caught a 16 ½ inch black drum. We released undersized sheepshead, small snook, and a crevalle jack. On a drizzly Friday morning, ahead of tropical Storm Bonnie’s arrival, I fished Estero Bay with Dwayne McCoy and his sister, Heather Romines. There was trout a-plenty again—sixteen of them, including four keepers to 17 inches, along with a 20-inch Spanish mackerel, small sheepshead, ladyfish and crevalle jack, all biting shrimp. We released all but the keeper trout. Saturday morning, the sun was shining and the only remnants Bonnie were some slightly higher than usual winds. I fished inshore with Terry and Lori Dobbs and friends, Tom & Jane, all from Arkansas. We went after trout with shrimp and popping corks and caught a bunch of those, including two nice keepers at just over 20 inches and 16 inches—Lori caught both of those, along with a 15-inch sheepshead. Tom caught and released a twenty-pound stingray, as the group tried to capture its immensity on film. We also released ladyfish, smaller trout and smaller sheepshead. The group got to see some dolphins and a manatee, on our way back to shore. The photo shown is of eleven-year-old angler, T.J. Shubert with a 16-inch trout, caught on shrimp and a popping cork, on a recent inshore trip. And here's a video link, shot by one of my customers, for some goliath grouper action: [video=youtube;osdNhG3vACs]
  17. It has been a real oven here the last couple of days with temps at 100-105. It is either sit inside or be out on and in the water. I chose the water. Saturday I towed my jet ski to Rudee Inlet in Virginia Beach and ran 16 miles offshore to the Chesapeake Light Tower for some Spadefish. There were only a couple of boats there and the water visibility was decent at about 20 feet. The fish were very skitish and I only saw one caught on rod and reel. In the water they were also constantly on the run but I still managed to spear my four fish. I did not see anything other than spades. I was out from 1030-1530 hrs. Today My wife and I dropped at Messick Boat Ramp in Poquoson Virginia and ran all along Grandview, Buckroe, Fort Monroe and around The Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel. We fished off of Hampton Bar and caught some spot, croaker and a small speckled trout using bottom rigs and fishbites--blood worms for bait. Covered almost 60 miles this weekend and burned 15 gallons. Here are some pictures I took, the one of the water is a bunch of spadefish on the surface at the CLT.
  18. I am looking to spend around $50-$70 for a new rod for my daiwa AG9000B reel. I do most of my fishing off the delaware beaches. Any suggestions? Also I can't find the specs for my reel anywhere, I bought it used when I decided to try out surf fishing, and it has been a great reel, I just would like to know how big of line I can put on. It came with 30lb on it, and that is what I replaced it with. Thanks for any help.
  19. Well summer is most definitely here. Where was this 7 months ago. Right! This weather by far is much more acceptable than the cold snap here of 2010 that occurred. I welcome this weather year round. I am sure most of us would agree with this too. With that said the fishing the past several weeks has been outstanding. Epic days for sure. With the days being extremely hot out your best bet by far is to start early to beat the heat and finish before it is too hot out to enjoy the day. Start way before sunrise as the bite will drop off as mid day approaches and then will pick back up towards the end of day light hours. Redfish have been the major staple of the Mosquito Lagoon and the Indian River here near the New Smyrna Beach area to the Titusville flats. The redfish bite has been great at first light among the flats all throughout the backcountry waters in shallow waters with baitfish present. Clean water will help too. Sight fishing is at a premium for slot sized red fish and the bigger bull redfish. As always please just give your fellow anglers a very wide gap between you and them if you arrive to an area later than the boats already present. Good distance - 600 feet at least. It is just a common basic courtesy to apply any where you fish in the world. The early bird gets the worm. Many anglers work hard with stealth like tactics to get into position early to be in the right place at the right time. Redfish are hitting a wide variety of bait but the go to bait this time of year is a live finger mullet, mud minnow and soft plastics. Placing a mullet or mud minnow on a 3/0 circle hook and then a targeted precise cast to taillers will work most of the time. Just do not land on the fish you are throwing to and get it in front of them as the tail does not eat. They will spook and they will ALL run. However I have been getting some of the bigger redfish on some hand picked small blue crabs put on a circle hook then with a well placed soft presentation will bring on major big action. DOA plastics with a small weight on them will also produce great action while sight fishing. Please as always with every fish you are handling and landing make the first priority their quick release for a higher survival rate. Trout are being caught in good numbers while working the deeper ledges of the grass flats and the sand bars where mullet and bait fish are moving around. Stay in three to five feet of water. Pig fish will work but are hard to come by this year. As long as you can find clean waters top water baits will produce as well and always as well fly fishing is great on the lagoon. Moving throughout the lagoon and river look for bait pods being hammered by birds and most likely you will find jacks, ladyfish and blues mixed in. Captain Drew Cavanaugh Florida Inshore Fishing Charters Cell/352-223-7897 Email us at: drcfishmaster@cfl.rr.com Light tackle fishing guide on the Mosquito Lagoon. Specializing in fly fishing or spin fishing for redfish, trout, snook and tarpon. Visit us at: Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide - Indian River Redfish Charter - Fishing Orlando Fish the world famous Mosquito Lagoon. The redfish capital of the world!
  20. My wife said she wanted to find Flipper, so on a Dolpin Quest we went. We left our house in Poquoson on the jet ski and ran around the mouth of the Poquoson River and York River. Did not see any so we went over to New Point Comfort Light for a bit. Saw a lot of Pelicans and an Oyster Catcher. On the way back, around the Mouth of Mobjack Bay we found a big group of dolphin, they were very playful and hanging around the ski. Our Quest was complete! Here are a couple of pictures from today
  21. I recently moved down to GA and like to surf fish when I can. I'd like to try and surf fish down here on weekends, but don't really know of any surf fishing spots, towns, or the regulations. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
  22. So early Sunday morning I was slowly lifting my 12ft rod and dragging my bait (shrimp) and 4oz weight across the bottom. when the tip would get all the way up, I would reel it back down and then slowly repeat the process...essentially out of bordom, and because I was a little cold so it was nice to have something to do. So i'm bringing it in, and all of a sudden- it's stuck. Not really like in the lake where if you catch something it slowly brings up tension as you pull harder on it. This was just...stuck. Figured the surf had pushed it under something... But, I'm in the ocean? So what the hell am I stuck on? I've been casting in this spot all weekend, and never had any issue. So, I pull, and pull, and pull. I'm putting A LOT of force into my rod. Getting nervous I'm going to break it the thing is bent over double, I could easly pull a fairly large hunk of wood through the water...I've got 20lb test w/ 80lb shock leader, so I know I can put a fair bit of force on it. So after pulling for 5 min. with no success, I start to let the line go slack, like you do when bass fishing, to let the sinker or hook de-lodge itself. No good. After 15 more min of me walking up and down the beach trying various angles, I let it go completely slack walk back to the sand spikes and other rods, reel up the slack, and really pull. Then, it kinda moves and instantly comes free. Not broken, no damage to the sinker or hook (2/0 circle), no damage to shock leader. So, I tell my friend about this (a long time Maryland surf fisherman) and he thinks I wasn't stuck at all- he thinks it was a big ray or skate, possibly buried itself in the sand. And now I'm kicking myself, because at least that would have been something for the photo album. What do you guys think? A bunch of BS? Or could I actually have had something? Ever heard of this happening? Or of people getting stuck on the camping beaches at AI????? It's been bugging me since I got back...something just doesn't make sense...
  23. First off, great site here guys. Andrew K recommended that I check this place out. There is a wealth of information here that I am just trying to soak up. I will be heading our is several buddies to AI this weekend to try and hook some sharks, or anything else that bites. Is anyone heading up there this weekend, we would appreciate any tips on how to handle these guys. Also any tips you may have regarding rigs and baits would be appreciated. Thanks in advance for the help, hopefully come monday we will be posting some pics.
  24. I hit the pier looking for some spanish macks and blues ....I didn't hit any macks heck neither did anyone else...small blues did show up...the action was so slooow I took some randon shot of others
  25. By Captain Alan Sherman Seagrasses can be found all over the world in shallow bays, lagoons, estuaries and along coastal waters. Where there is water there are boaters navigating these waters successfully and often times not so successfully. In most areas the water is deep enough for their propellers to cut through the water without causing any damage to the bottom below them but the unsuccessful boaters that stray away from their appropriate depth of water can cause significant damage to the beds of seagrasses often unaware of how much damage they have created. As the propellers of these vessels make contact with the fragile seagrasses the propellers cut into the soft sand or mud bottoms creating a trench that is deeper than the waters adjacent to the freshly cut trench. Besides the propeller cutting the trench the propeller also cuts the fragile seagrasses leaving this deeper trench void of all seagrasses. The damage created is called a propeller scar or prop trail. A propeller scar may be just a few feet in length but can also be hundreds of yards or more in length. Almost immediately erosion of these propeller scars starts to take place making the trails wider and deeper and creating cloudy water from tidal flow and wave action. Seagrass meadows made up of one or many seagrasses such as turtle grass, shoal grass, manatee grass, star grass, widgeon grass, paddle grass and Johnson’s sea grass are very important to the shallow bays, lagoons and coastal waters all over the world because these seagrasses help provide protective nurseries and food sources for many marine species. These seagrasses also increase water qualities in the areas of the seagrass meadows and reduce wave energy along the coastlines. Columbia Sportswear, Bass Pro Shops and The Ocean Foundation have joined hands in an effort to restore seagrass meadows through education and habitat restoration. Recently I was invited take part in a two day event sponsored by Columbia Sportswear, The Ocean Foundation, Seagrass Recovery, Andy Newman, Bass Pro Shops and George Poveromo. The event was put together to bring awareness to how serious these propeller scars can be to our fragile bays, lagoons, shallow coastal waters and estuaries. During the event I had the opportunity to see firsthand propeller scars that had been accidently cut into fragile seagrass flats in Florida Bay off of Islamorada and then I got to take part in the actual repair of one of these propeller scars. With the guidance of the Seagrass Recovery project representatives, Kenny Wright and Beau Williams I was able to take part in repairing a propeller scar. Once at the sight of a propeller scar located just a few minutes from Wide World Sportsman in Islamorada it was quite obvious how bad a propeller scar actually is. I looked out on the beautiful green grass meadow only to see this horrific looking white stripe that had been cut into the meadow by a boater who thought there was more water under the propeller than there actually was. We anchored our boat and I donned a mask and snorkel and jumped into the crystal clear water that was just two feet deep. As I snorkeled the barren propeller scar it was obvious that the scar was deeper then the water surrounding it and that the seagrasses on the edge of that scar couldn’t grow into the trench. This scar was fairly new and had not grown much since the propeller scar had been created. Others joined me and then we started the repair of the propeller scar. First four foot biodegradable sediment tubes were place one at a time into the propeller scar. Once the propeller scar had been filled with these biodegradable sediment tubes long pieces of PVC tubing with wooden stands attached to the tops of the tube were driven into the ground and spaced out along the biodegradable sediment tubes. These biodegradable sediment tubes over the course of time will break down and completely fill the propeller scar bringing the depth of that scar back to its original level. The PVC tubes and stands are there to attract birds that will come and sit on the stands and eventually fertilize the area around the propeller scar with their guano. Three months after the biodegradable sediment tubes have been placed in the propeller scar, a crew from Seagrass Recovery will visit the site and plant seagrass plugs that were retrieved off the sea surface into the restored propeller scar. Twelve to eighteen months later the propeller scar will have been totally restored. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Seagrass Grow Project or would like more information on the Seagrass Grow Project than please visit these internet sites. Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) Sponsors of this Event were: Columbia Sportswear (Columbia Sportswear | Seagrass Recovery Seagrass Recovery (Seagrass Recovery) The Ocean Foundation (The Ocean Foundation) BassPro Shops/World Wide Sportsman (Bass Pro Shops Outdoors Online: Offering the best in Fishing, Hunting and Outdoor Products) Andy Newman, NewmanPR, the Florida Keys (NewmanPR) George Poveromo, Columbia Athlete, (George Poveromo's World Of Saltwater Fishing)