MosquitoCoast

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  1. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, December 2012<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> December Fishing Outlook<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Inshore, both redfish and sea trout will remain in the skinny water as long as the water temperatures stay warm. Inshore fishing is best once the sun warms the water a bit, so sleep in and enjoy a good cup of coffee before heading to the ramp. Fish in protected areas and sunny spots, and look for fish to be holding in sand pockets until the sun gets overhead. Also, now is also the time of year to target tailing black drum in the Banana River Lagoon No Motor Zone. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> When the weather is nice and the seas are fishable offshore, solid concentrations of kingfish will be holding on the inshore reefs and wrecks in 60 to 100 feet of water. Several prime locations to target December kingfish are the north end of Pelican Flats and 8A reef out of Port Canaveral. The kingfish bite should remain steady as long as water temperatures stay above 74 degrees. When near-shore waters approach the 70-degree mark, start looking for cobia and tripletail along Port Canaveral buoy line and the shallow waters just off the bight of the Cape. These two species normally hold around floating structure, but they also have a tendency to free swim once the water temperatures warms up in the afternoon. <o:p></o:p> If the ocean conditions are a bit too rough, good concentrations of breeder redfish will be holding in the inlet passes of Ponce De Leon and Sebastian. Try drifting the passes during the falling tide bouncing live pinfish off the bottom. In the Port Canaveral shipping channel, work the edges of the channel using the same technique. Remember these are oversize redfish, so please step up the size of your tackle to lessen the stress of the fight, and release them with extreme care to be caught again on another day. <o:p></o:p> Snook fishing will also remain steady around Sebastian Inlet as long as the water temperatures stay warm. It is best to target inlet snook during periods of slack tide fishing live pigfish, pinfish, or croakers at night in the channel under the A1A Bridge. Another notable species worth mentioning when speaking of inlet fishing is flounder. Depending on surf and lagoon temperatures, the flounder migration can stretch into December, with stragglers filtering through the passes all month. If the winds are westerly, concentrate your efforts along the beach, and look for pompano to begin moving off the inshore flats to the deeper troughs along the beach. Also look for schools of bluefish and Spanish mackerel shadowing pods of glass minnows and other bait is the surf. To target both blues and Spanish, watch for birds working bait pods, and through small jigs like the D.O.A C.A.L. and spoons with a fast retrieval to avoid cutoffs.<o:p></o:p> On the upper Saint Johns River look for the American and hickory shad runs to commence near the end of the month, and intensifying in January and February. Shad fishing is one of the most overlooked fisheries in Florida, and a fun fish to catch on both fly and light tackle gear.<o:p></o:p> In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who fished and worked with me this past year for your business and friendship, and I am looking forward to spending more time on the water with you in 2013. Also, now is the time to purchase your 2013 gift certificates at and receive 50.00 dollars off of the standard rate by either replying to this news letter or by calling me, so purchase a charter in advance for yourself or that certain angler close to your heart, and go fishing with them. <o:p></o:p> As always, if you need more information or have questions please contact me.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing and happy holidays,<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters<o:p></o:p> mosquitocoast@cfl.rr.com <o:p></o:p> www.irl-fishing.com <o:p></o:p> 407-416-1187 Cell<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> For all of your outdoor needs, visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors at www.mosquitocreek.com, it's where your adventure begin.
  2. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, December 2012<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> December Fishing Outlook<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Inshore, both redfish and sea trout will remain in the skinny water as long as the water temperatures stay warm. Inshore fishing is best once the sun warms the water a bit, so sleep in and enjoy a good cup of coffee before heading to the ramp. Fish in protected areas and sunny spots, and look for fish to be holding in sand pockets until the sun gets overhead. Also, now is also the time of year to target tailing black drum in the Banana River Lagoon No Motor Zone. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> When the weather is nice and the seas are fishable offshore, solid concentrations of kingfish will be holding on the inshore reefs and wrecks in 60 to 100 feet of water. Several prime locations to target December kingfish are the north end of Pelican Flats and 8A reef out of Port Canaveral. The kingfish bite should remain steady as long as water temperatures stay above 74 degrees. When near-shore waters approach the 70-degree mark, start looking for cobia and tripletail along Port Canaveral buoy line and the shallow waters just off the bight of the Cape. These two species normally hold around floating structure, but they also have a tendency to free swim once the water temperatures warms up in the afternoon. <o:p></o:p> If the ocean conditions are a bit too rough, good concentrations of breeder redfish will be holding in the inlet passes of Ponce De Leon and Sebastian. Try drifting the passes during the falling tide bouncing live pinfish off the bottom. In the Port Canaveral shipping channel, work the edges of the channel using the same technique. Remember these are oversize redfish, so please step up the size of your tackle to lessen the stress of the fight, and release them with extreme care to be caught again on another day. <o:p></o:p> Snook fishing will also remain steady around Sebastian Inlet as long as the water temperatures stay warm. It is best to target inlet snook during periods of slack tide fishing live pigfish, pinfish, or croakers at night in the channel under the A1A Bridge. Another notable species worth mentioning when speaking of inlet fishing is flounder. Depending on surf and lagoon temperatures, the flounder migration can stretch into December, with stragglers filtering through the passes all month. If the winds are westerly, concentrate your efforts along the beach, and look for pompano to begin moving off the inshore flats to the deeper troughs along the beach. Also look for schools of bluefish and Spanish mackerel shadowing pods of glass minnows and other bait is the surf. To target both blues and Spanish, watch for birds working bait pods, and through small jigs like the D.O.A C.A.L. and spoons with a fast retrieval to avoid cutoffs.<o:p></o:p> On the upper Saint Johns River look for the American and hickory shad runs to commence near the end of the month, and intensifying in January and February. Shad fishing is one of the most overlooked fisheries in Florida, and a fun fish to catch on both fly and light tackle gear.<o:p></o:p> In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who fished and worked with me this past year for your business and friendship, and I am looking forward to spending more time on the water with you in 2013. Also, now is the time to purchase your 2013 gift certificates at and receive 50.00 dollars off of the standard rate by either replying to this news letter or by calling me, so purchase a charter in advance for yourself or that certain angler close to your heart, and go fishing with them. <o:p></o:p> As always, if you need more information or have questions please contact me.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing and happy holidays,<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters<o:p></o:p> mosquitocoast@cfl.rr.com <o:p></o:p> www.irl-fishing.com <o:p></o:p> 407-416-1187 Cell<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> For all of your outdoor needs, visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors at www.mosquitocreek.com, it's where your adventure begin.
  3. [h=1]Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, July, 2012<o:p></o:p>[/h] <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> As many of you know our sunshine this past week has be in the liquid form, as Tropical Storm Debby finally moves out of Florida on her way up the eastern seaboard. Debby is our forth named storm of the year, and we can only hope we get a break and the seas settle down and allow us to fish offshore. 2012 marks my 15th year of keeping a fishing log and composing these reports, and there are typically two different phenomenon in July directly affecting our fishing conditions on Florida’s Space Coast.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> First, during the early part of July a coldwater upwelling called the Labrador Current often moves in from the depths of the Atlantic chilling the water column from the bottom up. This phenomenon is naturally caused by the Coriolis Effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coriolis_effect. The intensity of the upwelling varies from year to year, and it is impossible to predict. The Labrador Current has been known to chill ocean water temperatures as low as 50 degrees on bad years, and have very little effect of good ones. The second major influence, which we are already experiencing, is the impact of tropical weather systems (summer squalls) as they brush up against the Florida coast on their way north. Again, we know how tough it is to predict hurricanes, but these tropical systems can kick up some serious seas, even from a thousand miles away. <o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> Offshore, the Gulf Stream water temperatures are fairly consistent in July and August and if the summer squalls stay away, they are excellent months to target yellow fin tuna for those willing to make the long run east (70 to 150 miles). July typically marks the beginning of the mid summer doldrums bringing calmer seas, making the long ride to the other side of the Gulf Stream smoother and accessible even for smaller boats.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> Bottom fishing will remain good in July if the cold water stays away, but when it begins to push in, many species will either move in closer to shore seeking warmer water, or hightail it south. Depending on the magnitude of the coldwater influx, some blue water species will move inshore along the reefs and wrecks like Chris Benson, 8A, and Pelican Flats, with kingfish, dolphin, and cobia serving as the primary species. Also, cooler water has the tendency to push manta rays up on to the sandy shoals off of the Space Center, thus creating a midsummer cobia run.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> Along the beaches pods of pogies (Atlantic menhaden), greenies (thread fin herring), and glass minnows (bay anchovies) move in close to the beach bringing large tarpon, smoker kings, blacktip and spinner sharks, jack crevalle, and redfish with them. Also, look for snook fishing in the surf to improve as we get closer to the commencement of the fall bait run and the sea turtle hatch. Remember, snook are out of season June, July, and August, so if you target them, please handle and release them with extreme care. <o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> <o:p> </o:p> In the lagoons sea trout and redfish are the primary targets on the flats. Concentrate your efforts in areas of mullet schools using top water plugs in early morning and late afternoon hours, and at night. Once the sun grows hot and the top water bite slows, switch to fishing jigs like the 3“DOA CAL Shad on the deeper edges of the flats. Also July and August is the time of year when large schools of ladyfish and smaller sea trout shadow the schools of glass minnows in the deeper water. Last but not least, look for the pompano schools to be moving into the shadows around the causeway bridges where a well placed jig tipped with either sand fleas or fresh shrimp will provide a tasty meal.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> As always, nature holds the upper hand in setting the stage for July and August, so we just have to play it by ear and catch some fish.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> As always, if you have any questions or need more information, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters www.irl-fishing.com 407-416-1187 on the water Book a charter, and let’s go fishing.<o:p></o:p> Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for all of your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins!<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> <o:p> </o:p>
  4. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Report, June 8, 2012<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Up Coming Events and Seminars<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Sat, June 9, 10am - 12pm Fundamentals of Flats Fishing - Soft Plastic Baits at Mosquito Creek Outdoors. Join me for session 5 of our Free Fundamentals of Flats Fishing Workshops. This Saturday I will be discussing Soft Plastic Baits, how to rig them and fish them for the best success. Mosquito Creek is at 170 South Washington Ave. in Apopka, Florida, www.mosquitocreek.com <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Thursday June 14, 6:30 P.m. - 8:30 p.m. "Free Seminars" "Kingfish with Live Bait" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers, located in the Outback at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave., Apopka Florida, www.mosquitocreek.com.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape style="WIDTH: 528pt; HEIGHT: 351.75pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_1 alt="Captain John's Respectable Sea Trout" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1025"><v:imagedata o:title="Captain John's Respectable Sea Trout" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> This Week's Fishing Report<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> As many of you who live here in the sunshine state know, our sunshine this week has mostly been in the liquid form, with squally conditions dominating our forecast. Although it's been a little wet, the fishing has still been very good on the inshore flats and on the St Johns River for those willing to venture out into the rain, and God knows he's doing us a favor as we really need some relief from our extremely dry conditions.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> My first adventure last week was a trip to the Banana River Lagoon No-Motor Zone with my good friend Captain John Kumiski. The winds were from the southwest at about 5 knots, so we selected to fish the area I refer to as the middle bar. John was throwing fly (popper bug) and I was fishing with a shallow running DOA Bait Buster, and we commenced to wear out the sea trout. Between us, we caught at least 30 trout with a good number surpassing the two foot mark. I know you have already heard me say this, but I'll say it again, this has been the best sea trout action I've experienced in years with not only good numbers coming to the boat, but also sizable fish as well. The trick is the same as always, find concentrated mullet schools and you'll find trout.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> My next adventure was a trip on Sundaywith Les and Denise who were one of the winners at the Orlando Predators/Fish on Fire giveaway, and we decided to fish in the North IRL near Titusville. We started early to beat the weekend crowed, but the bite was very flat because of the full moon. For some reason, flats fishing is always tough for me during the full moon. I think the fish are very active, feeding all night, and them they are fat and lazy during the day. Although the bite was tough in the morning, it turned on around 1 p.m., and we ended the day with some very respectable fish. Most of our fish were caught on top water Skitterwalks and Chug Bugs, and Denise also did well on 3 inch DOA CAL Paddle Tails.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> My last adventure was on Wednesday, where I fished the First Annual Catfish Challenge on the St Johns River. The recent rain has the river water levels rising and the catfish moving. The challenge was between three boats to see who could catch the most largemouth bass and catfish, and I was teamed up with Mark Blyth, sports editor for the Orlando Sentinel. Well to make a long story short, we won the event catching 17 channel and blue catfish, with two over 10 pounds on fresh dead shrimp. I love catching the larger catfish on light tackle, and I look forward to the first significant rainfall of the year to get these fish moving.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Tomorrow, I'll be conducting a free seminar at Mosquito Creek Outdoor on rigging and fishing with soft plastic baits, so if you decide not to fish in the rain, come by and see us, it always informative and it's always free.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> As always, if you need more information or have any questions, please contact me.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing,<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters<o:p></o:p> 407-416-1187<o:p></o:p> Find all of you outdoor needs at www.mosquitocreek.com, it where your adventure begins!
  5. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, June 2012 <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Upcoming Seminars and Events<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Sat, June 2, 10am - 12pm Discover Fly Fishing at Mosquito Creek Outdoors. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> If you have ever had an interest in Fly Fishing this Free 2 hour seminar is the place to start. Captain Chris Myers, a certified FFF casting instructor, demonstrates all the basics you need to know to get started. Chris covers fly tackle, flies, casting, and also discusses our local waters where you can begin enjoying a new dimension in fishing. This seminar is free and the whole family is encouraged to attend. For more information please call our fishing department at 407-464-2000<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Sat, June 9, 10am - 12pm Fundamentals of Flats Fishing - Soft Plastic Baits at Mosquito Creek Outdoors<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Join Capt Tom Van Horn for session 5 of our Free Fundamentals of Flats Fishing Workshops. This Saturday they will be discussing Soft Plastic Baits, how to rig them and fish them for the best success. Mosquito Creek is at 170 South Washington Ave. in Apopka, Florida.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> June's Fishing Forecast <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Yep, the heat and humidity are rising, and so are fishing opportunities along the Indian River Lagoon Coast of Florida. Hot summer days can be brutal, so the fish will take advantage of the cooler nights, early morning and late evening hours to feed and stock their prey, and then they often snooze in the shade and deeper areas once the heat turns up. So seasoned anglers will adjust their routines in June, July, and August, by fishing at night, during the predawn hours, and in the late afternoon after work and reap the rewards of the summertime fishing bonanza.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape style="WIDTH: 517.5pt; HEIGHT: 387.75pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_1 alt="Max's Lagoon Lunker" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1028"><v:imagedata o:title="Max's Lagoon Lunker" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Along the beaches, look for the tarpon and shark numbers to increase, and let's not forget about the schools of large jack carvalle and the tripletail as both of these fisheries are cranking up. Some tarpon are already showing up, so as soon as the seas settle down from Tropical Storm Beryl, conditions should be right. Remember, snook season closes this week, so let's give them a chance to relax. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <v:shape style="WIDTH: 525.75pt; HEIGHT: 350.25pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_2 alt="Becky's Mega Jack" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1027"> <v:imagedata o:title="Becky's Mega Jack" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image003.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> When the summer doldrums set in, the waters clear, and the seas flatten out, the window of opportunity opens for smaller boats, so near-shore opportunities are typically the best you'll see all year along the beach. June is the time of year when the kingfish move in close shadowing schools of Atlantic menhaden (pogies) along the beach and in the Port Canaveral buoy line, and slow trolling live pogies can result in some outstanding catches.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <v:shape style="WIDTH: 528.75pt; HEIGHT: 396pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_3 alt="Beach Side Bonito" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1026"><v:imagedata o:title="Beach Side Bonito" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image005.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Offshore, look for the dolphin bite to slow as the schools begin to spread out. The kingfish concentration will remain good along the inshore reefs and wrecks of 8A Reef and Pelican Flats, so again slow trolling with live pogies will produce the best action. Additionally, bottom fishing will remain good for snapper and grouper until the first summer squall (hurricane) blows in and muddies up the water. For those adventurous anglers willing to venture to the Gulf Stream and beyond, flat seas will facilitate a smoother ride to the tuna grounds on the other side.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <v:shape style="WIDTH: 528.75pt; HEIGHT: 352.5pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_4 alt="John and Scotts Double" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1025"><v:imagedata o:title="John and Scotts Double" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image007.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> On the flats, focus your efforts between 2 and 9am, and in the late afternoon after the thunderstorms dissipate. Night fishing will also produce descent catches of redfish, snook, and trout. When fishing the flats at night, I prefer fishing real slow with glow in the dark shrimp imitation baits like the DOA Shrimp with a Woodie's Rattle Capsule inserted. If you can only fish during the heat of the day, target the deeper edges of the flats and docks with deepwater access with a 3 inch DOA CAL Paddle tail on a ¼ ounce jig. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> In the early morning look for trout and redfish up in the very skinny water around concentration of bait schools (mullet), and blind cast your favorite top water plug. Also look for schools of bay anchovies (glass minnows) in deeper waters. These schools can be located by watching for small terns and other sea birds working, and they usually are shadowed by concentrations of small trout and ladyfish. These fast moving schools produce fast and furious action for fly anglers casting small top-water popping bugs. This past few weeks, we've located some of these schools in the central Indian River Lagoon and Banana River Lagoon, so I can attest that they are here and chewing.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Remember as the days heat up, long battles will kill the fish, so if you plan on targeting large fish, you may want to step up your tackle to shorten the battle. Also, dissolved oxygen levels are lower, so leave them in the water as much as possible, and revive them completely before releasing them.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> As always, if you need more information or have questions, please contact me.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing,<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters<o:p></o:p> www.irl-fishing.com<o:p></o:p> 407-416-1187 on the water<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, it's Where my adventures begins!<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p>
  6. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Report, May 11, 2012<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> Upcoming Seminars and Events<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Saturday May 19th 10:00 to 12 Noon "Free Seminar" Class 4 of Fundamentals of Flats Fishing series, "Saltwater Lure (Hard Baits) Applications" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers, located in the Outback at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave., Apopka Florida, www.mosquitocreek.com.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Thursday May 24th - 6:30 P.m. to 8:30 p.m. "Free Seminars" "Summer Near-shore Opportunities" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers, located in the Outback at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave., Apopka Florida, www.mosquitocreek.com.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> This Weeks Fishing Report<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> As our summer time weather heats up on the Indian River Lagoon Coast of Florida, so goes the fishing. In the Lagoons of Mosquito, Indian River and Banana River, water levels are still low, and the water is clean and still not showing any signs of our typical summer alga blooms. These conditions have facilitated some of the best sea trout fishing I can remember, with good numbers of oversize trout being caught. On several charters over the past week, several dozen trout were caught and most were larger fish. Our best results are coming on top-water plugs like the Rapla Skitterwalk fished in very shallow water in the area of mullet schools. As for redfish, the catching has been tough in the areas I've been fishing.<o:p></o:p> <o:p> </o:p> On the freshwater side, the bass fishing has been off the hook on the St Johns River. Schooling largemouth and sunshine bass have been feeding on menhaden schools between first light and 10 a.m. To locate these schools, first look for shore birds grouping and busting fish. Once located, work the areas of busting fish with small top-water plugs and small swim baits. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> All in all, the catching has been great, so get out on the water and enjoy it while the weather holds.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> As always, if you have any questions or need more information, please contact me.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing,<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters<o:p></o:p> www.irl-fishing.com<o:p></o:p> (407) 416-1187<o:p></o:p>
  7. [TABLE=class: MsoNormalTable, width: 100%] <TBODY>[TR] [TD=bgcolor: transparent][TABLE=class: MsoNormalTable, width: 100%] <TBODY>[TR] [TD=bgcolor: transparent]Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Report, August 6, 2011<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Upcoming Seminars and Events<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Saturday, August 13th Introduction to Fly Fishing<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> 10:00 - 12 Noon, Free Introduction to Fly Fishing Class instructed by FFF Certified Instructor and veteran Mosquito lagoon Fishing Guide Captain Chris Myers. Located in the Outback section of Mosquito Creek Outdoor, 170 South Washington Ave. Apopka Florida www.mosquitocreek.com<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Saturday, August 20th Snook Fishing <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> 10: 00 - 12:00 Snook Fishing Tactics "Free Seminars" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers, "Snook Fishing Tactics ", located in the Outback at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 S.<o:p></o:p> Washington Ave., Apopka Florida, <o:p></o:p> www.mosquitocreek.com.<o:p></o:p> <v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape style="WIDTH: 510pt; HEIGHT: 382.5pt; VISIBILITY: visible; mso-wrap-style: square" id=Picture_x0020_1 alt="Carie's First Redfish" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1025"><v:imagedata o:title="Carie's First Redfish" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> Last Weeks Fishing Report<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Well, the heat of summer is upon us, and thus far we have dodged the summer squalls as Emily skirts the east Florida coast heading north offshore with little or no ill effects to our weather on Florida’s Indian River Lagoon Coast. Heat indexes have been reaching 100 degrees plus by noon, so start your day before sunrise and start looking for a cool shady place by noon.<o:p></o:p> On the lagoons this past week, waters levels are up and the clarity has improver some, but we still have a heavy concentration of alga in the water making sight fishing tougher. The mullet schools are starting to form up on the flats and the redfish have been mixed in. The key has been to locate heavy concentrations of mullet and then watch very closely for reds amongst them. Matching the hatch with a weedless lure like the DOA Baitbuster has proven successful this past week, or try fishing very slow with a Berkley Gulp or DOA Shrimp under the mullet schools.<o:p></o:p> There have also been reports of medium size tarpon (40 to 60 pounds) showing up in the Hualover Canal and lagoon channels, but there are still no real signs of the glass minnow schools in open water like we typically see this time of year.<o:p></o:p> Along the beach, the snook are starting to show up in the surf from Patrick AFB south and there are good numbers of large tarpon working bait pods from the edge of the breakers out to forty feet of water. The key for the tarpon is to locate pods of pogies, and then watch for tarpon rolling. After fish are located, either slow troll or drift live baits back into the school. There have also been bonita and some kingfish in the same areas and some kingfish on the Port Canaveral buoy line, but the better concentrations of kingfish have been o 8A Reef or Pelican Flats.<o:p></o:p> As always, if you need information or have any questions, please contact me.<o:p></o:p> Good luck and good fishing,<o:p></o:p> Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> mosquitocoast@cfl.rr.com<o:p></o:p> http://www.irl-fishing.com <o:p></o:p> (407) 416-1187<o:p></o:p> For all of your outdoor needs, visit www.mosquitocreek.com, it’s where your adventure begins.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> [/TD] [/TR] </TBODY>[/TABLE] [/TD] [/TR] </TBODY>[/TABLE] <o:p> </o:p>
  8. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, December 2010<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Upcoming Seminars and Events<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> Saturday, December 11th - 10: 00 - 12:00 PM, Shad & Crappie Derby Anglers Registration Meeting at Mosquito Creek Outdoors. "Free Seminars" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers and Charlie McCullough, "Preparing for the Shad Run & Crappie Season", anglers giveaways and more, located in the Outback at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave., Apopka Florida, http://www.mosquitocreek.com. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> January 1, 2011 Derby starts at safe light. (Both shad and crappie derbies)<o:p></o:p> Saturday, January 22nd 11:00 - 2:00 PM, Free Crappie Rally at Boat Tree Marina Sanford, "Free Seminar" Instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers and Charlie McCullough, "Catching American Shad & Crappie". Event includes sponsor displays, giveaways and a raffle with all proceeds going to Anglers for Conservation (AFC), Hook Kids on Fishing Program. <o:p></o:p> Saturday, February 12th 11:00 - 2:00 PM, Free Shad Rally at the Jolly Gator Fish Camp adjacent to CS Lee Park in Geneva, Florida - "Free Seminar" instructed by Captains Tom Van Horn, Chris Myers and Charlie McCullough, "Shad Fishing Tactics" Event includes sponsor displays, giveaways and a raffle with all proceeds going to Anglers for conservation (AFC), Hook Kids on Fishing Program.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> February 28th 2011 Derby ends at sunset. (Both shad and crappie derbies)<o:p></o:p> Saturday, March 5th at 12 Noon: Shad and Crappie Derby Awards Ceremony at Mosquito Creek Outdoors, 170 South Washington Ave., Apopka Florida.<o:p></o:p> For more details on the 2011 Central Florida Shad Derby, go to http://www.cfshadderby.com. <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> December's Fishing Outlook<o:p></o:p> When the weather is nice and the seas are fishable offshore, solid concentrations of kingfish will be holding on the inshore reefs and wrecks in 60 to 100 feet of water. Several prime locations to target December kingfish are the north end of Pelican Flats and 8A reef out of Port Canaveral. The kingfish bite should remain steady as long as water temperatures stay above 74 degrees. When near-shore waters approach the 70-degree mark, start looking for cobia and tripletail along Port Canaveral buoy line and the shallow waters just off the bight of the Cape. These two species normally hold around floating structure, but they also have a tendency to free swim once the water temperatures warms up in the afternoon.<o:p></o:p> <?xml:namespace prefix = v ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" /><v:shapetype id=_x0000_t75 stroked="f" filled="f" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" coordsize="21600,21600"><v:stroke joinstyle="miter"></v:stroke><v:formulas><v:f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></v:f><v:f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></v:f><v:f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></v:f></v:formulas><v:path o:connecttype="rect" gradientshapeok="t" o:extrusionok="f"></v:path><o:lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></o:lock></v:shapetype><v:shape id=Picture_x0020_1 style="VISIBILITY: visible; WIDTH: 509.25pt; HEIGHT: 381.75pt; mso-wrap-style: square" alt="Red on Fly Caught by Captain Chris Myers" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1027"><v:imagedata o:title="Red on Fly Caught by Captain Chris Myers" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image001.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p> Inshore, both redfish and sea trout will remain in the skinny water as long as the water temperatures stay warm. Inshore fishing is best once the sun warms the water a bit, so sleep in and enjoy a good cup of coffee before heading to the ramp. Fish in protected areas and sunny spots, and look for fish to be holding in sand pockets until the sun gets overhead. Also, now is also the time of year to target tailing black drum in the Banana River Lagoon No Motor Zone. <o:p></o:p> If the ocean conditions are a bit too rough, good concentrations of breeder redfish will be holding in the inlet passes of Ponce <ACRONYM title=Delaware>De</ACRONYM> Leon and Sebastian. Try drifting the passes during the falling tide bouncing live pinfish off the bottom. In the Port Canaveral shipping channel, work the edges of the channel using the same technique. Remember these are oversize redfish, so please step up the size of your tackle to lessen the stress of the fight, and release them with extreme care to be caught again on another day. <v:shape id=Picture_x0020_2 style="VISIBILITY: visible; WIDTH: 509.25pt; HEIGHT: 678pt; mso-wrap-style: square" alt="Kirk's Frisky Beach Kingfish" type="#_x0000_t75" o:spid="_x0000_i1026"><v:imagedata o:title="Kirk's Frisky Beach Kingfish" src="file:///C:\DOCUME~1\Jay\LOCALS~1\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\clip_image003.jpg"></v:imagedata></v:shape><o:p></o:p>Snook fishing will also remain steady around Sebastian Inlet as long as the water temperatures stay warm. It is best to target inlet snook during periods of slack tide fishing live pigfish, pinfish, or croakers at night in the channel under the A1A Bridge. Snook season ends December 15th, so if you enjoy a snook dinner once in a while, don't hesitate. Another notable species worth mentioning when speaking of inlet fishing is flounder. Depending on surf and lagoon temperatures, the flounder migration can stretch into December, with stragglers filtering through the passes all month. If the winds are westerly, concentrate your efforts along the beach, and look for pompano to begin moving off the inshore flats to the deeper troughs along the beach. Also look for schools of bluefish and Spanish mackerel shadowing pods of glass minnows and other bait is the surf. To target both blues and Spanish, watch for birds working bait pods, and through small jigs like the D.O.A C.A.L. and spoons with a fast retrieval to avoid cutoffs. On the upper Saint Johns River look for the American and hickory shad runs to commence near the end of the month, and intensifying in January and February. Shad fishing is one of the most overlooked fisheries in Florida, and a fun fish to catch on both fly and light tackle gear. <o:p></o:p> Remember, sea trout are out of season from November 1<SUP>st</SUP> through January 1<SUP>st </SUP>on Florida's east coast, so if you catch one, please handle and release it with extreme care.<o:p></o:p> In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who fished and worked with me this past year for your business and friendship, and I am looking forward to spending more time on the water with you. Also, now is the time to purchase your 2011 gift certificates at and receive 50.00 dollars off of the standard rate by either replying to this news letter or by calling me, so purchase a charter in advance for yourself or that certain angler close to your heart, and go fishing with them. As always, if you have any questions or just need information, please contact me. Happy Holidays, and good luck and good fishing, and God bless, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters www.irl-fishing.com 407-416-1187 on the water 407-366-8085 office Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins! <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p>
  9. Mosquito Creek Outdoor's Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, May 2010 by Captain Tom Van Horn The longer days of summer allow enthusiastic anglers along Florida's Space Coast to take pleasure in spending their afternoons after work relaxing on the water. Warming coastal waters draw streams of baitfish north followed by warm water predators, as our prevailing easterly winds give way to summers genially shifting sea breezes. On the Lagoon flats, redfish and spotted sea trout will provide the majority of action for light tackle and fly anglers. The water has warmed up to the point where jack crevalle, ladyfish, snook, and tarpon are showing up in good numbers. Although they will bite all day, I like to target redfish and sea trout at first light or at dusk with top water plugs like the Rapala Skitterwalk, or Storm Chug Bug. As the day heats up, change your focus to the deeper edges of the flats (2 to 3 feet deep) jigging with a DOA CAL Shad or 4" & 5.5" jerk baits. Offshore, dolphin fishing will be the focus of blue water anglers this month. April and May are the time of year when the larger bulls are taken off the Florida Space Coast. The early season dolphin bite has already yielded so big fish. As a bonus, the potential of taking a blue marlin or sailfish are good. Near-shore, the kingfish bite has heated up on the near-shore reefs and wrecks and some cobia are still around. As the seas settle down and the bait schools move in close to the beach, look for the kingfish action to move in also. Inshore, the bait pods, Atlantic menhaden (pogies), have shown up along the beach, and now is the best time to target the ocean predator shadowing these schools. It's not uncommon to catch large redfish, large jack crevalle, blacktip sharks, cobia, and tarpon from within these pods of bait. To locate bait pods, simply look for feeding birds, flipping and jumping bait, muddy water along the beach, and busting fish. Spanish mackerel, snook, redfish, jack crevalle, bluefish, flounder, sheepshead and black drum are just some of the species available in the Lagoon inlets and beaches this month. As the baitfish migration moves north, this type of fishing will only get better. As always, if you have any questions or need help, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide-Redfish Guides-Indian River Fishing Charter-Flats Fishing Central Florida-Captain Tom Van Horn (407) 416-1187 on the water (407) 366-8085 landline
  10. Mosquito Creek Outdoor's Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, April 2010 by Captain Tom Van Horn I can't help but get excited about the many different angling prospects spring delivers to the Indian River Coast of Florida. I'm always thankful for the chance to live, breath, and fish on these waters, and with the windy rainy March behind us, I'm ready to set the hook. Some of highlights of fishing on Florida's east central coast during the spring are the weather is still cool and enjoyable, and as the waters warm up, the fish begin to shift into their prespawning feeding mood. Some examples of this behavior are the cobia moving north ups the coast, and the spotted sea trout moving into their traditional spawning areas on the inshore flats. Like many saltwater species, the cobia and sea trout spawn in aggregations or groups, not on beds. In the case of the cobia, traditional spawning areas are off of the central east coast of the US, and in the northern Gulf of Mexico. As the fish migrate north, they burn energy and feed heavily along the way, hence the cobia run we are currently experiencing. On the flats, the smaller male sea trout move up into the shallow flats first, and then call the females in to spawn by drumming loudly just after dusk when the conditions are right, usually around the beginning on the first new moon or full moon in April, and then again on the new and full moons throughout the summer. On the lagoon flats, fish the early morning and late evening with your favorite top water plugs for extreme trout and redfish action, and soft plastics and jigs in deeper water, 2 to 3 feet after the midday sun settles in. April is the month when trout become egg laden for the spawn, so it's very important to handle and release the larger females with great care. Also, with the hard freeze killing so many fish, it is wise to simply release them all. If you are looking for snook and tarpon action inside, the Sebastian River will be the place to go, and remember both these species are catch and release only. Offshore, April marks the beginning of the fishing season for most blue water anglers. It represents the start of the April/May northern migration of dolphin in deeper water, 120 feet and beyond and usually brings in some of the largest bulls taken all year. April also marks the beginning of the Easter kingfish run on the near-shore reef outside Port Canaveral. It's the time of year when most of the larger kings, 30 to 50 pounds, are taken off 8A Reef, and Pelican Flats. As we move in near-shore, tripletail should become more dependable, and look for late season cobia as well. The cobia run thus far has been so; with bait pods (Atlantic menhaden or pogies) arriving late this year. As the bait pod move in, look for Spanish mackerel, bluefish, redfish, giant jack crevalle, sharks, and smoker kings. Concentrate your efforts in areas of bait pods. When you see areas of bait balled up and pushed to the surface, there is a high probability that feeding gamefish are pressuring the bait from underneath. In the inlets, look for good numbers of flounder, sheepshead and black drum around structure such as jetties and docks, and Spanish mackerel, blues, and large jacks in open water. Also look for the nighttime snook and tarpon action to heat up in the Sebastian Inlet. In the freshwater lakes and rivers, largemouth and striped bass action has will heat up on the St Johns River. Look for schooling bass at first light feeding on pilchards from the Osteen Bridge to Lake Harney. My favorite locations are in the river bends near the power lines at Lemon Bluff and at the south end of Lake Harney were the River dumps in. A good way to locate these schooling fish is to look for white pelicans and other wading birds congregating along the shore. When in the feeding mode, these fish will take most swim plugs, and small live shiners. Also, several years back we caught southern flounder in Lake Harney fishing pilchards on the bottom under the schooling bass. The bass bite was weak last year after the high water delivered by tropical storm Fay and we have high water again this year, so we can only hope the schooling bass are more cooperative this year. Also, spring is the time of year the larger catfish move up the river and into the creeks following the rising water. I know to most, their not a glamour species, by try telling my good friend Mike Murray that. Lastly, the bluegill and brim will be spawning soon on the lakes, so look for some popping bug fly fishing to heat up in our local Central Florida lakes. As always, if you have any questions or need help, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide-Redfish Guides-Indian River Fishing Charter-Flats Fishing Central Florida-Captain Tom Van Horn (407) 416-1187 on the water (407) 366-8085 landline For all of your outdoor supplies and fishing tackle needs, visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors at Mosquito Creek Outdoors.
  11. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian Lagoon Coast Fishing Outlook, March 2010 Up Coming Events March 7th, Paddle Fishing the Banana River Lagoon No-Motor Zone, Central Florida Boat Show, 2 pm at the Orange County Convention Center. March 27th, Free Cobia and Tripletail seminar from 10 am to noon at Mosquito Creek Outdoors in Apopka Florida, 170 South Washington Avenue. For more details visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors April 24th, Free Hook Kids on Fishing seminar from 10 am to noon at the Apopka Foliage Festival. After completing the five learning stations, each child will receive a free fishing rod, reel and tackle box. To register your children, visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors in Apopka Florida at 170 South Washington Avenue or contact them at (407) 464-2000. April 25th, Free Certified Conservation Angler seminar from 10 am to noon at the Apopka Foliage Festival. Learn from the Coastal Angler Magazine Pro Tour and Anglers for Conservation how to lighten your footprint while enjoying the sport of fishing. Take the pledge to but the resource first. To register visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors in Apopka Florida at 170 South Washington Avenue or contact them at (407) 464-2000. March Fishing Outlook Reflecting back on my past years here on the Space Coast, I can't remember a colder winter and as I sit here composing the forecast another cold front is passing through Central Florida. Although it's been a challenging winter for anglers, March is around the corner and with warmer weather comes improved fishing on all fronts along the Lagoon Coast. As the days grow longer and the ocean begins its continuing warming phase, 68 to 72 degree range, the spring fishing bonanza on the Indian Lagoon Coast kicks in. As usual, weather will serve as the determining factor in establishing the magnitude and progression of the bite and the predator species we love to catch. Water temperature increases will facilitate the progression of bait pods (menhaden or pogies) from the deeper water into the near-shore waters bringing the predators with them. Sea conditions will determine the number of fishable days we'll experience in March. This is especially true for those of us who target deep-water species in shallow water boats. Good reports of cobia are starting to come in from offshore of Stuart. These fish should be moving into our area shortly, and both the bait pods and cobia will be showing up soon on the near-shore wrecks and reefs outside Port Canaveral and Sebastian Inlet. Other near-shore options in March consist of tripletail hanging on floating structure and weeds and large redfish and sharks shadowing bait pods along the beaches and inlets around mid month. When site fishing for cobia and tripletail, consider fishing in the latter part of the day when the sun is high as the water is warmer and visibility is better. Also, always keep a chartreuse colored buck tail in the ready position to cast at any brown clowns that wonder into range. As the water warms up and the silver mullet returns to the inshore lagoon flats, look for redfish schools to continue to form up in the skinny water. For the slot redfish, 18 to 27 inches, focus on areas of flipping and jumping baitfish (mullet) in water depths of 12 to 18 inches. For the larger redfish, concentrate your efforts along deeper edges of the flats and sandbars in 2 to 3 feet of water. Also, sea trout will continue to hold in the skinny water potholes, and the top-water sea trout bite will improve as the warmer water draws finger mullet back onto the central IRL flats. Additionally, schools of black drum will continue to inhabit the shallow water flats of the Mosquito Lagoon, North IRL, and particularly the sandbars in the Banana River No-Motor-Zone. Last but not least, the American shad run is developing on the upper St John's River between the areas of Lake Harney and the SR 50 Bridge, but this years run has been slow thus far. Also, March is the month to start targeting schooling large mouth bass in the deeper bends of the river at first light feeding on schools of baitfish (menhaden). The indicator I use to locate these schooling bass is to look for large numbers of white pelicans, herons, and egrets working the banks. Once you've located the schooling fish, try throwing a rattle-trap or other small subsurface swim bait. Water levels are higher this spring on the St. Johns River, so please be careful when navigating the river and creeks as the water is above the banks in some areas. Spring is one of the best times to fish the Indian River Lagoon coast of Florida. So if you are planning to visit the area, make sure you book your hotel and fishing guide early. Also, when the bite is on, the ramps fill up quickly, so arrive early, and are polite and considerate with other anglers, because we are all on the water for the same reasons, to have fun. As always, if you need information or have any questions, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide-Redfish Guides-Indian River Fishing Charter-Flats Fishing Central Florida-Captain Tom Van Horn 407-366-8085 office 407-416-1187 on the water
  12. Mosquito Creek Outdoor's Indian River Lagoon Fishing Forecast, February 2010 By Captain Tom Van Horn As winters go here in Central Florida, the 10 day freeze we experienced last month was the coldest weather we’ve seen since 1977. The prolonged period of cold dropped lagoon water temperatures into the 40’s. These extreme cold conditions killed a large number of fish both in saltwater and freshwater, but all is not lost. As the water temperatures warmed up surviving species began to return to the flats, and it appears redfish and black drum were not lost to the arctic chill. Additionally, despite notable loses, a good number of sea trout and some snook managed to find warm enough water to survive. On the freshwater side, only exotic species like tilapia and armored catfish subsided to the freeze, which doesn’t hurt my feelings too much. Inshore on the saltwater flats of the Mosquito Lagoon, good numbers of redfish and black drum have been easy to locate when conditions are calm and sunny, but getting them to eat has been challenging. On the sunny mornings, it is not uncommon to find redfish and trout holding in the sandy potholes within the shallow flats where water temperatures raise faster. Additionally, warming water temperatures combined with sunny spring days and crystal clear water make February one of the best months to site fish for redfish, sea trout, and black drum on the lagoon flats. Also, now is the time to target tailing black drum in the Banana River Lagoon "No Motor Zone". As we move further away from the extreme cold event, the redfish and drum should begin to feed more readily. Offshore, kingfish are still available along the inshore reefs and wrecks, and they will remain there as long as the water temperatures are favorable. When targeting kingfish this month focus your efforts on the areas of 8A Reef, Pelican Flats and Bethel Shoals to the south for best results. Also, look for cobia and amberjack to be present on the inshore wrecks like the Carol Lee, Dutch, and Sub Wreck out of Port Canaveral. Additionally, live bait is tough to find this time of year, so always carry a box of frozen Spanish sardines with you as backup. Near-shore, tripletail concentrations should improve along the Port Canaveral buoy line and under floating weeds and structures, and cobia will move in shadowing manta rays if the surface water temperatures reach the upper sixties. Now is also the time for beach anglers to target pompano, bluefish, weakfish, small black drum, sheepshead, Spanish mackerel and whiting in the surf. On those windy days in February it is a great time to check out those freshwater fishing holes on the St Johns River. Currently, the American shad run has yet to materialize with only sporadic catches being reported. The shad run has yet to kick off this year, but my best fishing last year was on the 15th of February, so it’s too soon to judge the magnitude of the run this year. This past week, the best reports of shad came from the Marina Isles to Mullet Lake section of the St. Johns River, as well as a good number shad being taken north of Lake Harney. As the run progresses the shad should be moving into the shallows flats south of Hwy 46, so if you haven’t signed up for the Shad Derby yet, there is still plenty of time left. Also, be sure to check out the new Coastal Angler Magazine Orlando in print and online for free at Coastal Angler Magazine The Largest Florida Fishing Magazine for Anglers. As always, if you have questions or need information, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Guide-Redfish Guides-Indian River Fishing Charter-Flats Fishing Central Florida-Captain Tom Van Horn mosquitocoast@cfl.rr.com 407-366-8085 office 407-416-1187 on the water For all you outdoor shopping needs, visit Mosquito Creek Outdoors at Mosquito Creek Outdoors.
  13. Mosquito Creek Outdoors Indian River Lagoon Coast Fishing Forecast, May 2009 <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p> By Captain Tom Van Horn <o:p></o:p> As the breezes of April give way to the summer doldrums, warmer and calmer ocean waters set the stage for some of the best near-shore fishing experienced all year, especially for the folks running smaller boats. The baitfish have already arrived in good numbers and the strong easterly fetch which set up during the end of April will push in clean water, flotsam and fish inshore. The bait pods, Atlantic menhaden (pogies), have shown up along the beach, and now is the best time to target the ocean predator shadowing these schools. Drag screaming kingfish and large jack crevalle are my favorite targets, but it’s not uncommon to catch large redfish, blacktip sharks, cobia, and tarpon from within these pods of bait as well. To locate bait pods, simply look for feeding birds, flipping and jumping bait, muddy water along the beach, and busting fish. Offshore, dolphin fishing will be the focus of blue water anglers this month. April and May are the time of year when the larger bulls are taken off the Florida Space Coast. The early season dolphin bite has already yielded fish in excess of 60 pounds. Also, as a bonus, the potential of taking a blue marlin or sailfish are good. Near-shore, the kingfish bite has heated up on the near-shore reefs and wrecks and some cobia are still around. As the seas settle down and the bait schools move in close to the beach, look for the kingfish action to move in also. Additionally, Spanish mackerel, snook, large redfish, bluefish, flounder, sheepshead and black drum are just some of the species available in the Lagoon inlets and beaches this month. As the baitfish migration moves north, this type of fishing will only improve. On the Lagoon flats, redfish and spotted sea trout will provide the majority of action for light tackle and fly anglers. The water has warmed up to the point where jack crevalle, ladyfish, snook, and tarpon are showing up in good numbers. I like to target redfish and sea trout at first light or at dusk, with top water plugs like the Rapala Skitterwalk or Storm Chug Bug. As the day heats up, change your focus to the deeper edges of the flats (2 to 3 feet deep) jigging with a DOA CAL tail or the DOA Deadly Combo. <o:p></o:p> Last but not least, if you are interested in learning more about fishing the saltwater flats, mark your calendar for the free flats fishing class 2 of 8 class series, “Lines Leaders and Practical Knots, Saturday May 16<SUP>th</SUP>, at Mosquito Creek Outdoors in Apopka Florida. As always, if you have any questions or need more information, please contact me. Good luck and good fishing, Captain Tom Van Horn Mosquito Coast Fishing Charters http://www.irl-fishing.com 407-366-8085 landline 407-416-1187 on the water Book a charter, and let’s go fishing. Visit www.mosquitocreekoutdoors.com for your outdoor adventure needs, its Where the Adventure Begins!