Sam

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About Sam

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  • Birthday 03/27/77
  1. Very nice!
  2. Who ordered all this snow?
  3. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is seeking input on 2017 recreational summer flounder fishery management. A public hearing is scheduled today at 6 PM at the Ocean Pines Library, the address is: 11107 Cathell Road Berlin, Maryland For additional information please contact Steve.Doctor@maryland.gov
  4. Mike Naipawer won Wednesday’s pool aboard the Elaine B II with this 13-pound tog.Arctic cold followed by snow and rain made for a lousy weekend. But it didn’t bring an end to the season. The tog boats sailed as soon as they could out at the beginning of the week and the blackfish were waiting. Actually, that fishery seems to be getting better as we move toward the end of the year with captains reporting lots of limit catches and double-digit fish. Unfortunately, the striper fishing is headed in the other direction, which is to be expected this time of year. The bass remain on the beach, although they’ve diminished in size. Keepers are scarce. Guys trolling Mojos and shad rigs were catching the bigger fish down to the south. Phil Sciortino Sr. at the Tackle Box in Hazlet said the surf had gone quiet up at Sandy Hook but the blackfish boats out of the marinas along Raritan Bay were still catching plenty of fish. Capt. Hal Hagaman on the Sea Tiger II out of Atlantic Highlands reported a good turnout on Tuesday with nice weather and a solid bite. His fares picked away at shorts and keepers with one limit catch and a number of folks with three to five keepers. As long as the weather cooperates, Capt Hagaman said he’ll be sailing a Christmas Day trip leaving the dock at 7:30 and returning by 1 p.m. Capt. George Bachert on the Angler out of Atlantic Highlands got back out on Wednesday and fished both inshore and offshore and found a big spread of fish. He reported a load of shorts and some keeper tog along with a cod taken in the shallow water. The move farther offshore produced bigger blackfish and the first ling of the year. Capt. Stan Zagleski on the Elaine B II out of Highlands called Tuesday’s tog fishing excellent. He said the fish bit all around the boat and everyone ended up with early limits. Nelson Mendoza of Kinnelon got a keeper cod to go along with his limit of tog and Todd Kitaguchi of Fort Lee, had his limit and the pool fish. Capt. Zagleski said Wednesday’s bite wasn’t as hot as Tuesday’s but they still ended up with a couple of limit catches while others landed four or five keepers each. He also reported the first mackerel of the year biting on bare hooks. Mike Naipawer of Bloomingdale took the pool with a 13-pound tog. Ernie Giglio at Giglio’s Bait and Tackle in Sea Bright said it’s gone quiet in terms of anglers in the last week, but the fish are still around. The bass in the suds are hitting paddletail swim baits, Mag Darters and SP Minnows. With the Christmas lights behind me, I fished on Wednesday evening in Ocean Grove and brought numerous short stripers to my lure, a small Cyclone swimming plug, although only a few struck. They were all about 20 inches or less. Bob Matthews at Fisherman’s Den in Belmar said the flounder fishing is still good in the Shark River and the stripers continue to bite in the surf, although all he’s hearing about is small fish. The best fishing, Matthews said, is for blackfish. There have been a lot of nice fish landed aboard the Big Mohawk and Capt. Cal II, and the Ocean Explorer landed a 14 pounder earlier this week. Matthews added that the Shark River Inlet is loaded with herring and sundials and guys are taking them home by the bucketful. He also said the shop has received good reports of medium-sized bluefin tuna hitting poppers at the Mud Hole on heavy spinning tackle. Eric Bunz at the Reel Seat in Brielle said this bluefin bite has been one of the best in memory. The fish have ranged from 40 pounds to just shy of 100 and have been found from five miles out to Monster’s Ledge. It’s a lot of casting, he said, but guys are getting bites. Bunz said the Williamson SubSurface Pro has been the lure of choice. Bunz added that the offshore sea bass bite finally picked up and the tog fishing is holding steady. Some days are just better than others. Capt. Pete Sykes of Parker Pete’s Sportfishing said the weather washed him out for the weekend but he got out on Wednesday. Overall, it was one of those tough days and didn’t find a good bite until later in the day. He was planning on fishing the rest of the week and will be booking trips as long as the weather allows. The Big Jamaica out of Bogan’s Basin in Brielle sailed offshore for sea bass on Wednesday and Capt. Howard Bogan reported that everyone got their limit of giant sea bass, along with porgies and some bluefish. Jason Szabo at Fishermen’s Supply in Point Pleasant said it’s been a bit quiet around there with most of the action centering on the blackfish bite. The boats out of the Manasquan Inlet are picking up double-digit fish on jigs and green crabs and white leggers on the Sea Girt and Axel Carlson reefs. The bass are on the local beaches, hitting soft plastics and plugs, but most are pretty small, he said. John Bushell at Betty and Nick’s Bait and Tackle in Seaside Park said it’s been pretty quiet there as well with hardly anyone hitting the beach. He did say D.J. Muller caught a number of bass on shads and bucktails over the last couple of days. Liza at Creekside Outfitters in Waretown said it’s been pretty quiet there, too, but the stripers are still biting on Island Beach State Park and Long Beach Island. Pearl paddletails, she said, have been the popular choice. She also said the tog anglers have been doing well on the Garden State North Reef. Creekside will be closing after next week and will reopen in March. Matt at Tony’s Bait and Tackle in Manahawkin said the cold has kept folks away but there are fish around. You just have to be there to catch them. Andy Grossman at Riptide Bait and Tackle in Brigantine reported that the stripers in the surf disappeared in late November, but the guys trolling Mojos and shad rigs are still getting some big bass. He reported stripers up to 45 pounds caught by boats trolling 2 miles out of the Absecon Inlet. Justin at Fin-atics in Ocean City said the surf fishing for bass went quiet there as well but the guys trolling for bass were catching some nice fish. The problem, he said, was they were doing it a little too far offshore. The Coast Guard came down hard on boats trolling well outside the 3-mile line last week and busted more than a few fishermen. Justin indicated there are fish to be caught within the legal line so there’s no need to incur the wrath of the authorities. The tog, he said, continue to bite well, but they’re beginning to move farther offshore. Fishing Forecast for New Jersey The beaches in the northern part of the state are still holding stripers and with the weather forecast relatively mild for the Christmas weekend, there’s bass to be caught. Even though the fish are pretty small, it’s still a lot of fun. Paddletail shads small swimming plugs and bucktails should catch you some fish. The blackfish boats are all catching nice fish. The six-fish limit ends on Dec. 31, then it’s down to four. Boats heading offshore for jumbo sea bass and porgies are also doing well, so you might want to consider that for the holiday week. Call ahead as the boats can be sold out. Source: http://www.onthewater.com/
  5. Long Island The first day of winter has arrived and with it has been a mix of cold and warm weather. This hasn’t made things easy for late year anglers but the fish are still biting. Herring are the stars of the end of the season it seems but reports of sea bass and cod are around and have been claiming great results. At Stella Maris, Stretch reports that the herring are still being pulled from the Coney Island Pier and out of the bay. At night time, these fish can be found under the lights and have been yielding just as much success as during the day. John Sr. from Terminal Tackle has had some herring around but notes that there are not as many as people had expected for this time of year in the local waters. The best fishing has been at Centerport Dam and Huntington Harbor. Stony Brook, Port Jeff and Mt. Saini are also good places to check as anglers have been running into them there as well. At Miller Place Bait & Tackle, Jim backs up the claims of the herring running through the back of Mt. Saini Harbor. He has also heard of the local, year-round schoolie stripers being found not far behind the herring. Further East, at White Water Outfitters, Jake reports that the local boats have been filling their limits on sea bass and cod lately. The boats have been making the trips out to about 30-40 phantoms for fishing and whether you’re targeting cod or sea bass, most anglers have been leaving with a full limit and stuffed freezer. Finally, at River Bay Outfitters, Paul has not seen any action on the saltwater front but the freshwater has continued to be hot. The Connetquot River is still producing plenty of trout and will remain open all year. This is a spring fed creek so it should be clear of ice and keep the water temperature warmer than other areas. This helps not only the fish but the anglers too. So, when all else is slow, look to load up the fly-fishing gear and snag some trout while the crowds are low. Fishing Forecast for Long Island For the time being, herring are running the show for Long Island anglers. There is nothing wrong with spending an afternoon or night chasing them to keep us out of trouble. For anglers looking to take a trip out offshore, Montauk is the hotspot at the moment for cod and sea bass and can make for a day to remember. On the freshwater scene, look to keep hammering away at the trout in rivers and creeks until the weather stays cold enough for ice to form on the local ponds and lakes. Just make sure to give the gear a check before its time because the ice can come and go as quick as the fish.
  6. Connecticut Fishing Report Andrew, at Fishing Factory 3 in Middletown, reported that the ice fishing enthusiasts had a nice shot at some early ice before the weekend precipitation. No matter where you were located in the state, there was a good chance that you had some decent ice before Sunday, and despite that rain there is still some fish-able ice in the northern half of the state. The extended forecast doesn’t look terribly promising for the ice crew, but the next day or two should still provide a few opportunities on the hard water at some smaller ponds. Once the warm weather settles in look for the Housatonic or lower Connecticut River to provide some good schoolie action, for those trying to wet a line. Joe, at Rivers End in Old Saybrook, reports that everyone was fired up for some early ice, but most hopes were quickly dashed by Sunday’s rain. Again, some ice can be found in the upper elevations, but most are probably better off waiting a week or two. The rain may have killed the ice but it helped the schoolie striped bass action. The rain and subsequent snow melt brought some fish back to life in the lower Connecticut and Housatonic Rivers. Ian, at Fisherman’s World in Norwalk, reports that the local herring bite has struggled to really materialize. Fish are being jigged up behind the Maritime Center and the marina docks, but if you are expecting lights out action it hasn’t been there yet. School striped bass have been the most reliable target for those trying to bend a rod. All three of the major tidal rivers in CT are producing in the usual spots, with the Housatonic having the best action, but also the most pressure. Ice came and went pretty quickly in southwest CT, but the smaller places have held a base that will likely grow well whenever the nighttime temps start to drop again. Torrey, at Upcountry Sport-fishing in Pine Meadow in Pine Meadow, reports that results on the Farmington have been highly varied. Some have reported extremely slow days, while others have had 25-30 fish days. Flow is up to 205 cfs in the permanent catch and release area; which is higher than it has been, but still relatively low. The lower-than-usual flow has resulted in more ice, so anglers should look to warmer weather windows when the shelf ice will break up, or fish closer to the dam. Winter caddis (18-24) has been the main hatch in the mornings and early afternoons. Matching that hatch has had good results, but nymphs and slowly fished streamers have also been producing. Connecticut Fishing Forecast Ice anglers may have been able to scratch the itch over the weekend, but we now must be patient or head north. In the meantime, cod and sea bass continue to bite off Block Island, and school bass can be found throughout both states. Hopefully you can find some tight lines over the weekend, but either way have a safe and happy holiday weekend.
  7. Southern Maine Fishing Report Hey, it’s not every day you get a chance to talk to Brady! Of course, the “Brady” I’m referring to is not number 12 but the Brady of Dag’s Bait in Auburn, who is pretty famous in his own right! While this Brady had little to say about the Jets game this Saturday, he did say that the Sabattus “pike-factory” was in operation. This spot has always been a go-to place for numbers of pike but in recent years the fish seem to be getting bigger! Brady’s been catching a few pike from the Andro but nothing bigger than 10 pounds yet but the feeling is that with the impending low pressure front coming in through Saturday, those bigger pike may be more in the mood to feed! For black bass give the basin a try which leads into Lake Auburn, big largemouth are known to cruise among this place. For not only largemouth, but smallies as well as brown trout and brook trout, Worthley Pond in Peru is a winner. This pond is the recipient of a recent stocking and some of the brown trout were 19″ beauties! Opt for larger shiners than you would for brook trout, set up your traps just off of points descending into deeper water and you might catch a brood stock brown trout! Renee of Sebago Bait said that regulars are expecting a solid season at Sebago Lake this year which would be a refreshing change from last season. Meanwhile anglers are keeping busy with brookies from the Otter Ponds and Parker Pond as well as browns and rainbows from Little Sebago. Maine Fishing Forecast While you may be wishing that Winnipesaukee would open tomorrow, there are several other nearby “Ws” which are winners. Waukewan is known for its rainbow trout and smallmouth bass. Drop a trout worm close to the shore of White Lake and you may best a brookie. Wicwas in Meredith is a better choice for both species of black bass with panfish another option. Sabattus remains one of Maine’s better choices for having an impressive day for pike. While Worthley is worth a shot if you’d like to tangle with brook trout and brown trout. Above all, be. safe out there and I hope you have the absolute happiest of holidays and a merry, merry Christmas! Source: http://www.onthewater.com/
  8. Rhode Island Fishing Report The Frances Fleet in Narragansett was able to leave the docks a couple times last week, and each time the cod action seemed to be in peak winter form. Last Sunday saw big numbers, some of the biggest of the year, with most anglers getting a limit. Those who missed out on a full limit were only a fish or two away. Last Wednesdays’ trip saw similar results numbers wise, and there were some big fish in the mix. Multiple fish were pushing 20-pounds on the scale! There are still plenty of keeper black sea bass to go around, along with some big mackerel. The cod grounds are loaded with bait, and fresh-shucked clams are producing very well. Jigs seem to be producing just as well, so be prepared to fish both. Cod trips will continue to sail daily at 6 AM, but the schedule often changes this time of year. Be sure to check with their website or call ahead before you make the ride. Dave, at Ocean State Tackle in Providence, reports that things have been quiet around the shop this week, but those who have got out have found some success for multiple species. Cod and sea bass reports have quieted, but that is due in large part to the weather and the holiday season. Those that have made a trip under decent conditions are still finding good numbers of both species. Dave has a large supply of fresh-shucked clams, which is a rarity this time of year. Dave also mentioned that the carp guys are still finding plenty of fish to bite in most of the usual hotspots. If you don’t mind the cold there are plenty of school bass in the Providence and Seekonk Rivers. They have been relatively easy to locate, especially after dark, with white and chartreuse jigs and grubs. Ice anglers had a small window of opportunity before the weekend rain, and reports have been good from most of the smaller ponds. Largemouth bass have been biting well under the ice, and some of the smaller bodies of water may be safe for another day or two. The Saltwater Edge in Middletown reports that things have been quiet around the shop as the cold weather has kept some indoors. The diehards are still finding decent numbers of school bass in the salt ponds and tidal rivers. The bulk of the saltwater attention is on winter cod and sea bassing. Reports have been excellent whenever the weather has allowed. The upcoming forecast looks fairly promising so cod and sea bass results should remain strong through the holidays. Connecticut Fishing Report Andrew, at Fishin Factory 3 in Middletown, reported that the ice fishing enthusiasts had a nice shot at some early ice before the weekend precipitation. No matter where you were located in the state, there was a good chance that you had some decent ice before Sunday, and despite that rain there is still some fish-able ice in the northern half of the state. The extended forecast doesn’t look terribly promising for the ice crew, but the next day or two should still provide a few opportunities on the hard water at some smaller ponds. Once the warm weather settles in look for the Housatonic or lower Connecticut River to provide some good schoolie action, for those trying to wet a line. Joe, at Rivers End in Old Saybrook, reports that everyone was fired up for some early ice, but most hopes were quickly dashed by Sunday’s rain. Again, some ice can be found in the upper elevations, but most are probably better off waiting a week or two. The rain may have killed the ice but it helped the schoolie striped bass action. The rain and subsequent snow melt brought some fish back to life in the lower Connecticut and Housatonic Rivers. Ian, at Fisherman’s World in Norwalk, reports that the local herring bite has struggled to really materialize. Fish are being jigged up behind the Maritime Center and the marina docks, but if you are expecting lights out action it hasn’t been there yet. School striped bass have been the most reliable target for those trying to bend a rod. All three of the major tidal rivers in CT are producing in the usual spots, with the Housatonic having the best action, but also the most pressure. Ice came and went pretty quickly in southwest CT, but the smaller places have held a base that will likely grow well whenever the nighttime temps start to drop again. Torrey, at Upcountry Sportfishing in Pine Meadow in Pine Meadow, reports that results on the Farmington have been highly varied. Some have reported extremely slow days, while others have had 25-30 fish days. Flow is up to 205 cfs in the permanent catch and release area; which is higher than it has been, but still relatively low. The lower-than-usual flow has resulted in more ice, so anglers should look to warmer weather windows when the shelf ice will break up, or fish closer to the dam. Winter caddis (18-24) has been the main hatch in the mornings and early afternoons. Matching that hatch has had good results, but nymphs and slowly fished streamers have also been producing. Rhode Island Fishing Forecast Ice anglers may have been able to scratch the itch over the weekend, but we now must be patient or head north. In the meantime, cod and sea bass continue to bite off Block Island, and school bass can be found throughout both states. Hopefully you can find some tight lines over the weekend, but either way have a safe and happy holiday weekend. Source: http://www.onthewater.com/
  9. When more naughty than nice, kids in these parts used to be scolded with the threat of nothing more than ice water left by old Saint Nick. If that’s the case, then hardwater addicts must have been misbehaving in force since up to a foot of ice awaits if you travel out west. Central Massachusetts Fishing Report Many looked at the early season snow of last Saturday with all the enthusiasm of being jostled by a mall full of frenzied shoppers – but not Mike Dumais of Northborough. Dropping flakes coincide with dropping barometric pressure, and attentive fishermen know that’s a reason to expect fish to binge, even when their environment is locked under a 5-inch ceiling of ice! All went as planned as Mike and a pal found a popular place light on anglers and heavy on pike to just under 15 pounds and largemouth bass up to 6! Obviously, selecting big bait is rule number one when it comes to pike, but for over-sized largemouth bass (and even smallies), go large there as well. And, of course, if you can put in a few pre-shoveling hours of fishing as the snow flies, your chances of besting biggies goes up too. For a shot at a hard-water hog, Eddie of B&A in West Boylston suggests Peter Carr Pond or possibly South Meadow or Mossy Pond in the Clinton/Sterling stretch. Peter Carr is also stocked with trout and you can increase your chances of catching a holdover there if you focus near the railroad bridge. Comet has skimmed over but wait until you see other “scouts” out and about before you venture out there. Mike Dumais of Northborough iced this big bass as the snow flew last Saturday. Connecticut Valley Region My timing was good to call my friend Rodney from Flagg’s in Orange as anglers made their maiden trip to Mattawa just yesterday! With all the trout recently stocked in that place I bet the angler was hopping. While trout are the primary quarry here, this place has some unheralded big perch and bass! If you wanted to be first to fish Clubhouse Pond and Lake Ellis you were off by about a week as patrons of the shop have already been out in both places since last Thursday. These spots have a nice mixture of early ice, trout and bass. For smallies, the nod goes to Clubhouse. You’ll find fresh ice also at Lake Rohunta as well as North and South Spectacle Ponds. Of course your first priority during your first outing on a pond should be safety: fish with a buddy, exercise caution and test sample the ice as you go until you gain familiarity with the conditions. Strapping some ice picks around your shoulders wouldn’t hurt and bringing a rope isn’t a bad idea either. Massachusetts Western Region The conditions are especially favorable once you head out toward the western side of Massachusetts. Jim from JCB Bait in Cheshire said that some water bodies in the Hill-towns already were sporting 12″ of ice! As encouraging as that is, what might be even better is the quantity and quality of trout in many of these spots. Anglers are boasting about no-problem limits for rainbows and browns from North Pond, Plainfield Pond and Windsor Pond. Two other colors which are figuring prominently in the enjoyment factor among these high-altitude gems are black and white, as in plenty of black ice and little snow! All that luck is of little wonder with the volume of recent stockings here. Mix up the sizes of your shiners and opt for smalls for the rainbows and mediums for the more voracious brown trout. Big water locations are also locking up such as Lake Buel, Onota, Pontoosuc and Cheshire. Not surprisingly people have already caught pike but there has been no news on big northerns yet. Massachusetts Northeast Fishing Report While nearer the coast from the South Shore through Greater Boston has sketchy ice conditions, that all changes once you head up north according to Don from Merrimack Sports. Lake Attitash has about 6″ of ice and they’ve been catching bass. Tewksbury Pond is solid as well, and if you’re more interested in trout, try Round Pond where rainbow trout are the quarry. For a warm water species mixture, check out Lake Cochichewick. The wait is on for the big bait brigade who are dying to tackle the toothies which swim in the quieter stretches of the Shawsheen, Concord and Merrimack Rivers. Pike propagate here because of the vast ribbon of interconnected rivers, which also include the Assabett and Sudbury Rivers. Those nomadic northerns have everything they need here: diversity of habitat, spawning areas and plenty of forage. Now all we need is a sustained chill to lock it all up. Massachusetts Fishing Forecast Here’s to the happiest of holidays and the merriest Christmas possible for all the readers of this forecast! Odds are you’ll have a bustling weekend, but I’m hoping you’ll be able to spare a little hardwater “me-time”! Consider the Central Region “Coach Lakes” – South Meadow and Mossy – for a warm-water species grab bag. For possibly even more variety head westward for pike and trout in Pontoosuc or pike and bass from Cheshire. For an aesthetic and angling delight ogle the pleasing view at one of the Hill-town ponds such as Plainfield Pond or North Pond. But don’t get stuck in a daydream for too long, lest you want a rainbow to make off with your bait! Source: http://www.onthewater.com/
  10. Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife Fishing Report Updated: Dec. 22, 2016 DELAWARE BAY The recent up and down weather has made fishing, let alone catching, very difficult. When we have a temperature that swings from 70 to 20 and gale force winds not even mad dogs and Englishmen go out. The forecast is looking better, but I have no idea if there will be any rockfish left in the bay or the Rips when the boats finally get away from the dock. I have no doubt that anglers will be out there and that is the only way we can tell if the fish are available. Further up the bay I would expect to find white perch in the tidal rivers and creeks. Some may also be caught from the piers at Woodland Beach and Port Mahon. Bloodworms or earthworms will be the best baits. INSHORE OCEAN If the weather settles down before the end of the year, there should be some good sea bass action beyond the 20-Fathom Line. The problem will be finding a captain willing to run during Christmas week. The same situation will occur if you want to catch tog. SURF FISHING Even the most radical surf caster is unlikely to go out in 20-degree temperatures and 40-knot winds. I did see a surf report from Sunday when the high was 70 degrees, unfortunately, no fish were caught. FRESHWATER Red Mill Pond did have skim ice late last week, but it was gone on Saturday. Still, these 50 degree temperature changes are bound to confuse the bass, crappie and pickerel. If you decide to do some pond fishing I believe live bait will be your best bet. HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Source: http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/fisheries/pages/fishingreport.aspx
  11. Winter of 2016-17 Ocean: Anglers can catch plenty of yellowfin tuna, as well as wahoo, in the winter when conditions permit. Offshore bottom fishing can be excellent in the winter, as well. In midrange waters, anglers target striped bass (if they migrate to North Carolina waters), and red drum fishing can be very good during warmer periods. Anglers should find a regional fishing website that reports daily catches or contact a local tackle shop for up-to-date fishing reports. Anglers may want to improve their chances of a great day of fishing by using the services of a charter boat or guide. Inlets/Sounds/Bays: When weather permits, fishing will be heavy with anglers targeting striped bass. Striped bass fishing was good this fall at Mann’s Harbor and surrounding areas and in the Roanoke, Croatan and northern Pamlico sounds. Fishing was especially good near bridges or any other structure. Striped bass anglers should check out the Wanchese Harbor, as well. Striped bass fishing is managed through a quota, so anglers should also check with the Division of Marine Fisheries before heading out. Other good winter catches are spotted seatrout and red drum. Good places to fish include around the bridge at Pirates Cove, barrier islands, Roanoke Sound and Oregon Inlet's Green Island Slough and rock jetty. Fishing is generally best from pre-dawn to mid-morning hours, then again just before dark. Piers/Shore: Piers are currently closed. Most will re-open around Easter. Beach anglers may have a tough time fishing this time of year due to rough surf and adverse weather. But when conditions permit, some of the largest red drum and striped bass are taken from the surf in the winter. Bluefish blitzes can happen this time of year, but it’s been a long time since North Carolina observed this kind of activity. There is also the possibility of some excellent speckled trout surf fishing on the beaches from Rodanthe southward. For the fishing year, all owners/operators of vessels recreational fishing for and/or retaining regulated Atlantic Highly Migratory Species (Atlantic tunas, sharks, swordfish and billfish) in the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea, must obtain an Atlantic Highly Migratory Species Angling permit. This permit has replaced the Atlantic tunas Angling category permit. In North Carolina, additional Highly Migratory Species harvest reporting requirements are also in place. To obtain a permit go to: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/compliance/permits_reporting/index.html Source: http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/northern-district
  12. Inshore water temperatures in the Charleston area range between about 59 and 64 degrees. Fall is always a great time for inshore fishing around Charleston, but Captain Rob Bennett of Lowcountry Inshore Charters (843-367-3777) reports that conditions have combined to make fishing this fall even better than usual. The fishing is still excellent. While fish can certainly be caught inshore, a lot of redfish are starting to move from the surf to the nearshore reefs right now. Rob advises that reds, spotted seatrout and black sea bass can all be found together at the reefs, and it’s not unusual to pull up a fat black sea bass and then immediately tangle with a 30-pound red drum. This makes for some really exciting fishing. When anglers are offshore they should also put out a live bait rig under a balloon, as water temperatures are about perfect for king mackerel right now. Inshore there are still plenty of redfish around traditional areas such as docks and other structure, but as temperatures drop fish are on the verge of grouping up into big schools. This should happen any day now and groups of 10-50 fish averaging 6-12 pounds will be a common occurrence on the flats. Captain Rob Bennett with a healthy redfish caught recently outside Charleston Trout can still be caught in the rivers, and they are biting well on artificialssuch as Zman Silver Streakz or most any grub (curly tail or flattail) behind a jighead. There are areas that will produce on each stage of the tide, but if you can pick your tide then fishing the high, outgoing tide is probably best. Extreme cold later in the winter should slow the bite down but for now the fishing is strong.
  13. Saltwater: Inshore: Capt. David Newlin reports, “Redfish madness is a good description of the fishing the last few weeks. The redfish bite has been as good as I have ever seen it. Last week I had several trips where we caught around 100 redfish from 14 to 30 inches. Catching a limit of fish in 30 minutes has been almost an everyday affair. A live shrimp under a cork has been fool proof. I have caught a lot of redfish on jigs fished under a rattling cork. A jig with a lot of gold glitter in the tail has been hot. Gulp Swimming Mullet in green with a 1/8-oz. white jig head has caught a lot of redfish and trout for me lately. Almost all of the smaller redfish are longer than 14 inches. They seemed to get to 14 inches a few weeks earlier this year when compared to some years. The next two months should be some of the best redfish catching that we have had in years. Next month more big fish longer than 30 inches should be showing up. Try fishing on the bottom with dead mullet on the beaches for some real big redfish. The trout bite has been good with a lot of small fish and big trout mixed together. The main key to catching trout has been finding clear water in the right places. Trout have been thick when you find them. Topwater action has been good early and late in the day. A Z-man shrimp in new penny fished under a cork has worked good when the small trashfish are stealing shrimp real bad. The trout bite should get better in September. The black drum bite is still going strong. A lot of days we have had 10 to 15 mixed in with the catch. Try fishing a dead shrimp on the bottom if you are targeting drum. Flounder have been showing up in good numbers on a lot of days. Tarpon will be here a few more weeks before they head south. Tarpon fishing can be hot in late September and early October. A lot of big blacktip sharks have been just off the beaches. I caught three big ones well over 100 pounds yesterday, and we kept one that was 130 pounds. Every year coastal Georgia anglers wait on the fall fishing with much anticipation, and this is going to be a good one. September 2016 should be a month of fishing we remember for a long time. Stay out of the woods for a few days, and enjoy some good fishing.” Capt. Judy Helmey reports, “The temperatures are still hot, but there is a subtle change that takes place in the month of September. All fish are basically put on notice that fall patterns are pending. This is the month for feeding on everything that is available. Spotted seatrout, redfish, sheepshead, black drum and flounder might feed at different times of the tides, but all of them like live shrimp. You can serve it up anyway you like, from naked with or without any sort of leader or weight, or under popping or adjustable floats. Once you get the bite going, you can change over to any leftover parts from previous hits or start using DOA shrimp patterns. When using pre-rigged DOAs, meaning when they are purchased with hook and balance weight, I suggest removing weight and hook. Then I suggest taking a 2/0 to 3/0 kahle hook and hooking the shrimp up like you do the real deal. Since you want the DOA to look as natural as possible, you would need to place the hook in the mid ship of the shrimp. Once it’s balanced on the hook’s bend, it become the perfect waving bait in the current under a popping cork or a adjustable float. The best early fall colors are root beer, clear gold glitter, clear chartreuse tail and golden cherry red. I suggest using 1/4-oz. DOA shrimp patterns: www.doalures.com. Another secret is to drop a few DOAs into the livewell. I call this ‘adding juice appeal.’ Also try fishing the Berkley Gulp Alive! I like the 3-inch Shrimp Assortment recharging baits, which have new penny/natural, shrimp/pearl and white/molting shrimp patterns all packed together: www.berkley-fishing.com/berkley-gulp-alive. Use popping corks or traditional adjustable floats, and thread onto a jig head tied directly to your fluorocarbon leader. There are quite a few alterative live baits that you can catch yourself. The creeks and backs of creeks are full of schooling finger mullet. They do come in all sizes from petite to larger finger mullet. I suggest keeping all sizes, because when using live bait, you want to match the hatch. The other live baits, which you could catch while casting for shrimp or finger mullet, are mud minnows, peanut menhaden, croaker and yellow tail.” Artificial Reefs: Capt. Judy reports, “The artificial reefs during September can at times seemly completely baron, and then as if someone turns on a switch, the bite starts. Therefore, when you arrive at a selected artificial reef, I suggest staying and waiting it out, because bites will happen eventually. When the bite is on, you could find yourself catching Spanish mackerel, king mackerel and barracuda. Trolling Clark and Drone spoons will get a topwater bite going. For those fishermen who prefer trolling, I suggest using medium-sized ballyhoo rigged with Sea Witches. The best colors have been red/black, blue/white and chartreuse. I prefer to rig the Sea Witch with my three hooks in a row, while using 100-lb. test single strand wire as my leader. It is old school, but it works. I take three 7/0 Mustad trailer hooks (j hook style with open eyes) and rig them in line: www.tackledirect.com/mustad-oshaughnessy-duratin-open-eye-hooks-34091dt.html. When a fish hits this rig, the hook configuration makes it almost impossible for them to avoid getting hooked up. As far as the bottom bite, I suggest doing a little drifting, keeping your baits at mid to lower water column depth. The best bait is going to be exactly what you catch with your gold-hook sabiki rig. And of course, always take along a little squid. This bait works offshore as well as shrimp does for inshore fish.” Offshore: Capt. Judy reports, “September for us offshore fishermen is ‘snag a gag month!’ This just means the grouper bite is better, because things are cooling down, causing more movement. During this month, all grouper, such as gags, scamps and red grouper, are more likely to be up and about. Best places to look for one of these fish are the live-bottom ledges at the Savannah Snapper Banks. The best baits are going to be live cigar minnows and Spanish sardines, which can be caught with sabiki gold-hook rigs, schooling over the structure at the artificial reefs. These baits are known for triggering a serious grouper bite. However, a bigger fish sometimes wants bigger bait. Baits caught at the banks are normally those fish that have air bladders, such as sand perch, rock bass, vermilion snapper, pin fish and ruby red lips. Before putting them in the livewell, I suggest deflating the air bladder with a sharp pointed knife. These baits will also bring on a big time grouper bite. For those who prefer jigging for their gags, I suggest using any sort of butterfly jig. When vertical jigging, I suggest using 80-lb. braided main line, 4 to 15 feet of fluorocarbon leader and a jig that has one or two hooks located at the top of the lure. You want your main line and your hooks at the same end. Jigging during this month is great because the large bottom fish start to move a little farther from the protection of the ledge. The secret to perfecting this style of fishing is to keep the jig moving as erratically as possible while still imitating a baitfish that’s trying to make a solid getaway move. If you really want a big, big pull, I suggest giving shark fishing a try in this area. So far this year while bottom fishing the Savannah Snapper Banks, we have been catching some of the largest bulls, sandbar tigers and sandbar sharks that I have seen in a while. If you are going to take one of these large sharks, please check regulations before heading out: http://coastalgadnr.org/fb/rf/regs. As far as getting hooked up, any fish that you have just caught, pan size or larger, cut the tail off, and set out on a beefed-up rig. Most of our sharks are caught on a Carolina-style rig with an 8-oz. sinker on the main line. Then tie on a 100-lb. swivel, and then tie on a leader. As far as a leader, I do not use any sort of wire leader. Instead, I use 10 to 20 feet of 80- to 100-lb. test monofilament line. To this setup, I tie my 14/0 circle hook directly on to my leader. This style hook pretty much ensures a behind-the-jaws, in-line hook-up, which means the shark normally cannot use its teeth to cut the line. Once hooked up, it is suggested to keep the line tight and not in-line with the shark. The roughness of the shark’s skin will fray your leader. Always situate the boat so that the main line is pulling straight off the shark’s head. As far as the topwater bite, we have catching king mackerel nearshore at the Savannah River Channel, artificial reefs and at the Savannah Snapper Banks. Best bait when targeting this fish is the liveliest possible—blue runners, ocean menhaden, Spanish sardines, Spanish mackerel and cigar minnows are just some of the good live bait choices. During this time, it’s not unusual to catch mahi mahi while bottom fishing. They are curious fish, and they will swim right to the boat. Just remove your weight off the bottom rig, loosen your drag and float your bait (squid or cut fish) right to the circling mahi mahi. While doing this, throw freely over the side a few pieces of bait. If they are hungry, this will really get them going. If there is more than on one mahi mahi, leave the last fish caught in the water until the next fish is hooked up.”
  14. We have already entered the month of December and Santa will be here in just a few short weeks. The weather conditions this year have been very abnormal so far with very few cold fronts and high winds coming from every direction. The fish seem to be undecided on the pattern that they should be in from schooling in the the pot holes one day after a small front to finding them spread out across the grass a couple days later. The cold fronts are what supply the winds we need to lower the water level and water temp's in the lagoon system. So with the higher water and higher than usual water temps the red fish and trout are still holding on the shallow grass flats mixed in with the pods of bait fish. In the northern part of the lagoon around New Smyrna and Edgewater look around the oyster bars that are holding bait and you will find a mixed bag of fish from sheep head, redfish, trout, flounder and snook. The southern lagoons water clarity has been hit or miss with some locations being very clean and others very dirty depending on the high winds we have had lately. When you do find the perfect flat with clear water and bait you will find happy fish. I like to throw plugs in the early morning then switching to ADL spoons and soft plastics as the sun gets higher, The flounder have been moving in thick around New Smyrna and Edgewater and can be caught bouncing the bottom with a soft plastic or shrimp on a jig head. The trout bite has been good through out both the north and south lagoon system. A free lined finger mullet or live shrimp is a great choice if you are trying to target that trout of a life time. Good luck and be safe! Capt Patrick Rood www.spotntailcharters.com (386)566-139
  15. The grip of winter is tightening upon the Maryland landscape this week and many types of fish and fishermen are hunkering down for the winter months. The striped bass season in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay is now closed and the lower Potomac will close on December 31st. Anglers in the coastal areas can still enjoy sea bass fishing until December 31st and tautog season opens on January 1st. It is always exciting when various fishing and outdoor shows begin to occur in January and mark a good time to restock on lures and equipment. It is also a good time to reflect on equipment and swap out that line that served you so well through the past season and be ready for 2017. In short the winter months provide down time to get everything ready for the upcoming fishing seasons and a great time to reflect on what worked and what didn't. As in most outdoor adventures, preparation and planning leads to anticipation which adds greatly to the total experience. . Freshwater opportunities include fishing for chain pickerel, yellow perch in the tidal rivers along with largemouth bass that are holding close to deep structure. Walleye, yellow perch, smallmouth bass and trout are active in the western areas of the state and often provide fun fishing opportunities for those who are prepared for it. The Fishing and Boating Services staff wish you a peaceful and happy holiday season with family and friends. The next fishing report will occur sometime in middle of January depending on fishing news and weather. Cold weather is in the forecast and although it can be troublesome to our day to day lives it holds the promise of ice fishing conditions at Deep Creek Lake and other western region impoundments. The Fishing and Boating Services staff have put together a fun parody on the song the "Twelve Days of Christmas" below for you to enjoy. Source: http://dnr.maryland.gov/